Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
The Mentoring Journey
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Mentoring Journey

365

Published on

This presentation comes to you from International Project Management Day 2013 - the annual global virtual summit from IIL that brings together business and technology leaders from around the world to …

This presentation comes to you from International Project Management Day 2013 - the annual global virtual summit from IIL that brings together business and technology leaders from around the world to discuss the latest trends and methods in business, leadership and communications. To view the accompanying video keynotes and presentations connect to the event here bit.ly/1blJSkE or purchase the DVD collection http://bit.ly/1fZ9Yc0

Published in: Business, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
365
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • [Introduce yourself] I'll be presenting on the topic of Mentoring The key aspects of which are “what is mentoring” and “why is beneficial to both the mentee and the mentor; as well as, to an organization”
  • - Professional Background- Current Role at Citigroup with respect to Project Management
  • - What is mentoring?- What does a mentor do?- Roles and responsibilities of mentor vs. mentee- Difference between mentoring and coaching (formal vs. informal)
  • Mentoring is the personal and professional development of an individual (Mentee) enabled by a more senior, skilled or experienced person (Mentor) Mentoring is a journey to developing oneselfIt is based upon encouragement, constructive feedback, openness, mutual trust, respect and a willingness to learnMentoring is about the desire for further development, being committed to the process, setting goals and accepting challenges- Mentoring is about sharing knowledge, understanding and experience
  • We need to be clear on what mentor is and is not.Mentoring Is:- A Development tool - A Knowledge Sharing Opportunity- An opportunity to improve understanding of the organization's cultureMentoring Is Not:- A Replacement for Formal Development- A Management Replacement- An Employee Assistance Program- A Guarantee of Promotion
  • - Communicate- Coach- Advise- Broker- AdvocatePlease notice the image of the compass on this slide. Having a mentor is similar to having a compass. They guide in a direction but the journey is yours to make
  • Each side of this relationship has a role to play.For the mentee, it is important to take the lead in driving the relationship because in the end the mentee must own their own development. The mentee also needs to be able to accept feedback and reflect on how to implement that feedback in their careersFor the mentor, they need to be candid in the feedback, ask open ended questions as not to solve the mentee problems but to point them in a direction of self discovery. Sharing of personal experiences is helpful in allowing the mentee to discover the right direction
  • While we have discussed what mentoring is and the associated roles & responsibilities, I think it is important to discuss the value of mentoring to both the mentee and mentor.Value to the Mentee- It Helps define realistic career goals- It provide a different perspective on current issues and problems- It can result in increased confidence and self-awareness which helps build performance and contribution - It can build organizational awareness/political savvyValue to the Mentor- It establishes networks/contacts in other parts of the business- It helps to develop and practice a more personal style of leadership- It provides personal satisfaction from assisting in the development of other
  • Mentoring can be used as and effective tool for project management. Knowledge mobility is critical to the future success of an organization. As such, mentoring is an excellent tool create knowledge mobilityThis can focus on the fundamentals of Project Management through:- Focus on learn by doing, the importance of communications and relationship building- Accept that project approach can vary greatly and different experiences shape this)Continue leveraging the mentor/mentee relationship as a PM Tool by:- Looking at the impact on interpersonal skills (learning the nuances of project relationships from others and how to maneuver delicate situations)- Enhanced project results (avoiding common mistakes before they happen, etc)
  • There are many types of mentoring models that have been used. On this slide, I am showing a number of these models that I have been involved with:- One-on One Mentoring - this is the classic model where the mentor is typically more seasoned than the mentee- Peer Mentoring - this is an effective tool in larger teams by leveraging the diverse experience of team members to share the learnings from one peer to another- Resource-Based Mentoring - Resource-based mentoring offers some of the same features as one-on-one mentoring. The main difference is that mentors and mentees are not matched by a program. Instead, mentors agree to add their names to a list of available mentors from which a mentee can choose. It is up to the mentee to initiate the process by asking one of the volunteer mentors for assistance. This model typically has limited support within the organization and may result in mismatched mentor-mentee pairing. - Group Mentoring - Group mentoring requires a mentor to work with 4-6 mentees at one time. The group meets periodically to discuss various topics. Combining senior and peer mentoring, the mentor and the peers help one another learn and develop appropriate skills and knowledge- Training Based Mentoring - This model is tied directly to a training program. A mentor is assigned to a mentee to help that person develop the specific skills being taught in the program. Training-based mentoring is limited, because it focuses on the subject at hand and doesn’t help the mentee develop a broader skill set. - Executive Mentoring - This top-down model may be the most effective way to create a mentoring culture and cultivate skills and knowledge throughout an organization. It is also an effective succession-planning tool, because it prevents the knowledge "brain drain" that would otherwise take place when senior management retires
  • Just like in any relationship, we have to consider some ground rules to ensure success:Understand the value of a Mentoring relationship and what you hope to gain from the experience (Mentor/Mentee)Agree on a “contract” and be clear about expectations and boundaries (Mentor/Mentee)Set goals and objectives – review these regularly (Mentor/Mentee)Set an agenda for each meeting (Mentee)Agree action points at the end of each meeting and commit to following through (Mentee)
  • Just like in project management, we need to incorporate lessons learned into any mentoring relationship. Let me share some of the lessons that I have seen in these types of relationships that have been a blocker to success:Excessive time and energy commitmentsMeetings that are frequently cancelledUnrealistic expectationsOverdependence- Ineffective Communication
  • In conclusion, let me just reflect on the main points that I have just discussed:Benefits of Mentoring - there can be enormous benefits of mentoring to both those involved as well as to an organization in helping develop the key talent and by mobilizing knowledgeRules for a Successful Mentoring Relationship - Mentoring can be successful and effective if respect the rules of the relationship along the journeyAs a mentor I have discovered, the best thing you can do is share your stories, empathize with the frustration, and try to lead by example[Thank the audience for their interest and the opportunity to share these ideas with them]
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Mentoring Journey Joanna Durand, Managing Director – Citigroup ©2013 International Institute for Learning, Inc., All rights reserved.
    • 2. Bio – Joanna Durand Name Joanna Durand – Managing Director Functional Title Citi Program Management Council (CPMC) - Chair & Year Started With Citi 2007 Global Program Management Office (GPMO) - Head Citi Experience: Joanna Durand has over 20 years of diverse leadership experience in global financial services organizations. Her leadership roles cover a robust portfolio of skills ranging from strategy, business planning/management, operations and technology delivery/execution, strategic alliances/partnerships, contract negotiations, process improvement, policies and standards and consensus building. She is currently a Managing Director at Citigroup. Joanna is Citi’s Head of Global Program Management. In this role she chairs the Citi Wide Program Management Council, a formally chartered enterprise wide governing body. She is responsible for establishing compliance and reporting policies and standards for Program and Project Management across the Enterprise and managing training, tools, data, communication and Citi’s PM Network. Additionally, her organization manages dedicated PMOs for various Citi teams. Educational Background and Certifications: Joanna earned a Bachelor of Administration degree from Agnes Scott College in Atlanta, Georgia; she also graduated from a number of Executive Leadership programs, including the acclaimed program from UNC Chapel Hill.
    • 3. Overview What is mentoring? What does a mentor do? Roles and responsibilities of mentor vs. mentee Difference between mentoring and coaching (formal vs. informal)
    • 4. What is Mentoring Mentoring is the personal and professional development of an individual (Mentee) enabled by a more senior, skilled or experienced person (Mentor) It is based upon encouragement, constructive feedback, openness, mutual trust, respect and a willingness to learn Mentoring is about the desire for further development, being committed to the process, setting goals and accepting challenges Mentoring is about sharing knowledge, understanding and experience
    • 5. Mentoring: What It Is and Is Not Mentoring is ... Development tool Knowledge Sharing Opportunity Improve understanding of the organization's culture Mentoring is Not ... Replacement for Formal Development Management Replacement Employee Assistance Program Guarantee of Promotion
    • 6. What does a Mentor do Communicate Coach Advise Broker Advocate
    • 7. Mentoring Roles & Responsibilities For the Mentee... Take initiative to drive the relationship with your Mentor Be responsible for your own growth and career development Be receptive to feedback and suggestions and be willing to try new things Challenge and self-reflect For the Mentor... Provide candid feedback and encourage candid selfreflection Ask questions to help Mentee think through situations; not just give answers Share personal experiences relevant to the needs of the Mentee
    • 8. Mentoring Value Proposition Mentee Helps define realistic career goals Mentoring Establishes networks/contacts in other parts of the business Different perspective on current issues and problems Develop and practice a more personal style of leadership Increased confidence and selfawareness which helps build performance and contribution Personal satisfaction from assisting in the development of others Build organizational awareness/political savvy
    • 9. Mentoring As a Project Management Tool Fundamentals of Project Management (Focus on learn by doing, importance of communications and relationship building)…project approach can vary greatly (different experiences shape this) Leveraging the mentor/mentee relationship as a PM Tool Impact on interpersonal skills (learning the nuances of project relationships from others and how to maneuver delicate situations) Enhanced project results (avoiding common mistakes before they happen, etc)
    • 10. Different Types of Mentoring Models One-on One Mentoring Peer Mentoring Resource-Based Mentoring Group Mentoring Training Based Mentoring Executive Mentoring
    • 11. Rules for a Successful Mentoring Relationship Item Rule Responsibility 1 Understand the value of a Mentoring relationship and what you hope to gain from the experience Mentee/Mentor 2 Agree on a “contract” and be clear about expectations and boundaries Mentee/Mentor 3 Set goals and objectives – review these regularly Mentee/Mentor 4 Set an agenda for each meeting Mentee 5 Agree action points at the end of each meeting and commit to following through Mentee
    • 12. Blockers to a Successful Mentoring Relationship Excessive time and energy commitments Meetings that are frequently cancelled Unrealistic expectations Overdependence Ineffective Communication
    • 13. Conclusion Benefits of Mentoring Rules for a Successful Mentoring Relationship As a mentor, the best thing you can do is share your stories, empathize with the frustration, and try to lead by example
    • 14. Questions?
    • 15. Intelligence – Integrity – Innovation We invite you to take a closer look at what we can accomplish together. Please visit iil.com or contact learning@iil.com to learn more about our training, consulting, coaching, customized courses and other pathways for professional development. Connect with Us: facebook.com/IIL.Inc @IILGlobal bit.ly/IILlinkedin ©2013 International Institute for Learning, Inc., All rights reserved. bit.ly/IILgoogle youtube.com/IILGlobal allpm.com

    ×