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The Past, Present and Future of the BA Profession
 

The Past, Present and Future of the BA Profession

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A (slightly edited) version of my presentation at Business Rules Forum 2009.

A (slightly edited) version of my presentation at Business Rules Forum 2009.

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  • For many organizations, strategy is an emergent phenomenonThey may not have a well defined set of goalsWhat they do may have little to do with those goals
  • Rework and abandoned systems$75B per yearFailed state DMV projects$45-67MCONFIRM rental car project$165MAutomating insurance policy processing$50MEuroDisney$4BFBI’s Virtual Case Mgt.$170M
  • The 20th century view is alive and well today—call it “naïve agile”Many (NOT all) Agilists assume that business value is what the users ask forIn practice users often ask for things that deliver zero or negative business value
  • Need for BAs = f(maturity, size, diversity)
  • BAs need to move away from thinking of themselves as IT folks
  • IIBA Research shows dozens of analysis techniques and notations in common useExpect to see drop as people standardize on tools

The Past, Present and Future of the BA Profession The Past, Present and Future of the BA Profession Presentation Transcript

  • The Past, Present, and Future of Business Analysis
    The Journey to Professional Excellence2009
  • 2
    Introduction
    Kevin Brennan, cbap®
    V.P. Professional Development, IIBA®
    Responsible for
    IIBA® Standards (BABOK® Guide and Extensions)
    EEP™ Program
    IIBA Community Network
    Career Centre
    Delivering PD Opportunities to IIBA® Members
    BA Experience
    Over 10 years as a business analyst
    Has used many different methodologies and worked in several industries
    © International Institute of Business Analysis
  • What we will talk about today
    What is a business analyst
    What do they do?
    What do they need to know?
    What is the state of the BA profession today?
    Why must BAs improve?
    Impact of bad business analysis?
    What is the future of the profession?
    3
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • 4
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
    Vision and Mission
    Vision
    The world's leading association for
    Business Analysis professionals
    Develop and maintain standards for the practice of business analysis and for the certification of its practitioners
    Mission
    IIBA® is an international not-for-profit professional association for business analysis professionals.
  • 5
    IIBA® Goals
    Strategic Goals
    Create and develop awareness and recognition of the value and contribution of the role of the Business Analysis Professional
    Define the Business Analysis Body of Knowledge® (BABOK®)
    Publicly recognize qualified practitioners through an internationally acknowledged certification program
    Provide a forum for knowledge sharing
    Operational Goals
    Ensure the long term viability of the organization
    Enable sustainable growth to support the establishment of the IIBA® as a worldwide organization
    Ensure financial viability to support the implementation and sustainment of the IIBA® operational and strategic priorities
    Consistently demonstrate value of the organization to IIBA ® constituents
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Defining a Profession
    What do business analysts do?
    What is the BABOK® Guide?
    6
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Defining Business Analysis
    “Business Analysis is the set of tasks and techniques used to work as a liaison among stakeholders in order to understand the structure, policies, and operations of an organization, and recommend solutions that enable the organization to achieve its goals.”
    7
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Less formally…
    Business Analysis involves analyzing a business
    8
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Orgs need self-awareness
    “Organizational effectiveness does not lie in that narrow minded concept called rationality. It lies in the blend of clearheaded logic and powerful intuition.”
    Henry Mintzberg
    9
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
    Source: © Mary Harrsch, used under CC BY-NC-SA
  • Value of Business Analysis
    It is about understanding:
    How an organization works
    Why the organization exists
    What are its goals and objectives
    How it accomplishes those objectives
    How it needs to change to better accomplish objectives or to meet new challenges
    It is about meeting business needs.
    It is about ensuring investment in the right solutions.
    10
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Business Analysis Body of Knowledge®
    Version 2
    • Identifies currently accepted practices
    • Recognizes business analysis is not synonymous with software requirements
    • Defined & enhanced by the professionals who apply it
    • Captures the sum of the knowledge required for the practice of business analysis as a profession
    The set of tasks, knowledge, & techniques required to identify business needs & determine solutions to business problems.
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
    11
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • BA Planning & Monitoring
    12
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Elicitation
    13
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Requirements Mgt. & Comm.
    14
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Enterprise Analysis Structure
    15
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Req’ts Analysis Structure
    16
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • SA&V Structure
    17
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Underlying Competencies
    18
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Techniques
    BABOK Guide lists the most commonly used BA techniques
    34 given detailed treatment
    Many more mentioned briefly
    All are used occasionally by a majority of BAs
    19
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Core Business Model
    20
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • How do we know this is right?
    IIBA followed the same process as used to develop ISO standards
    Developed over 4½ years with multiple public reviews
    Extensive input from industry experts
    Backed up by surveys of over 1000 BAs
    “Generally accepted” practice
    Methodology-neutral
    21
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Business Analysis Today
    What is the value of business analysis?
    How are companies using BAs?
    22
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Constant Growth in IT Costs
    Source: U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis
    23
  • Projects: Riddled with Complexity
    A Legacy of Complexity
    Complex business environment
    Multiple, inflexible systems functioning together
    Unproven technology
    Multiple products from diverse vendors
    Complex project teams
    Political sensitivity
    Complex organizational structure
    Coupled with Constantly Emerging New Trends
    IT Alignment
    Adaptive approaches
    Agile development
    Incremental delivery
    Complexity-reducing design techniques
    Limit interrelationships of system components
    Solution design tools
    New technologies
    SOA, BPM, Web 2.0, SaaS
    Requirements Mgt, Auto Test Tools
    24
  • IT Project Performance
    Nearly 2/3 of IT projects fail or are challenged
    What Measure is Missing?
    Source: The Standish Group Project Resolution History
    25
  • What the Experts Say
    Meta Group Research
    “Communication challenges between business teams and technologists are chronic - we estimate that 60%-80% of project failures can be attributed directly to poor requirements gathering, analysis, and management.”
    Forrester Research
    “Poorly defined applications have led to a persistent miscommunication between business and IT that largely contributes to a 66% project failure rate for these applications, costing U.S. businesses at least $30B every year.”
    James Martin
    “56% of defects can be attributed to requirements, and 82% of the effort to fix defects.”
    > 41% of new development resources are consumed on unnecessary or poorly specified requirements
    Source: Keith Ellis, Business Analysis Benchmark Study, The Impact of Business Requirements on the Success of Technology Projects, IAG Consulting, 2008
    26
  • Root Cause: Quality of BA Work
    Poor Requirements
    Questionable Strategic Alignment
    Inadequate Business Case
    Deficient Practices
    System vs. Business Specs
    Business Benefits not Measured
    Business Need
    Not Met
    Lost Opportunity
    Inadequate Tools
    Ineffective Prioritization and Resource Allocation
    Inadequate Business Involvement
    Inadequate Focus on Business
    27
  • If 40% of work is fixing errors
    In 2008 alone,
    $82.9 billion
    $207,300 per BA
    or
    Enough to cure world hunger
    (Estimated annual investment required worldwide, UN FAO, 8 Oct 2009)
    28
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Actually it’s probably worse…
    Stats are U.S. only
    Doesn’t take into consideration:
    Opportunity costs
    Requirements that failed to deliver full potential benefit
    Non-IT related requirements errors
    29
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • We Can Do Better
    30
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
    Source: IAG Business Analysis Benchmark - 2009
  • Our Challenge:Close the Gap in BA Capabilities
    31
  • “Off Balance”
    Without clarity in the Business Analyst role:
    • Focus on technology instead of the business
    • Rush to code/build
    • Insufficient customer involvement
    • Deficient requirements practices and tools
    • Not measuring business benefits
    32
  • Typical BA
    40 years old
    Well educated
    Hails from IT
    > 5 years BA experience
    Analysis skills acquired on the job
    33
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
    Sources: Recession in America July 17, 2008, Business Week http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/jul2008/tc20080717_842379.htm. The New Business Analyst: A Strategic Role in the Enterprise, November 2006 Evans Data Corporation Research Study
  • Importance of Specialist Skills
    34
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
    Source: Forrester/IIBA Survey, 2009.
  • Must Use Wide Range of Skills
    35
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
    Source: IIBA Survey, 2008
  • Change Still Needed
    We know what to do, but don’t do it
    BAs believe that all aspects of role as defined in BABOK are important
    BAs spend most actual work time on elicitation and specification
    EA, SA&V known to be important but are still not being done
    36
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • The Future of Business Analysis
    How is the BA role changing?
    How will BAs adapt to new technology?
    37
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Business & Business Analysis
    Business
    Developing, packaging, and selling products and services to customers to generate revenue
    Business Analysis
    Identifying and articulating the need for change, and facilitating that change
    38
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • The New Reality
    20th Century
    It’s about the technology
    “If the business would just give us the requirements, we could build a custom solution”
    or
    “If we build it, they will use it and love it”
    21st Century
    It’s about the business
    Architect the future state of the business when our strategy has been executed
    Identify gaps in capabilities needed to achieve future state
    Conduct feasibility analysis for best solution to fill gaps
    Build and continually validate the business case
    Elicit , analyze, evolve, iterate, validate requirements/solution
    39
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • How does BA Add Value?
    Benefits of BA
    Realization of Benefits
    Avoidance of Cost
    Identification of New Opportunities
    Understanding of Needed Capabilities
    Modeling the Organization
    Models are useful for:
    Communication
    Training
    Persuasion
    Analysis
    Compliance
    Software Requirements
    Direct Execution
    KM and Reuse
    40
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • The Opportunity
    41
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
    Organization Need for BAs = (maturity, size, diversity)
    MATURITY
    SIZE
    DIVERSITY
    Number of Product Lines
    Marketplace Uniformity
    Number of Employees
    Geographic Dispersion
    Age of
    Product Lines Marketplace Stability
    Competition
    • Multiple product lines may require a combination of generalists and highly specialized individuals
    • Highly specialized industries or niche markets will require specialists
    • Established product lines & stable markets require limited business analysis
    • Competitive and developing markets have a critical need for highly experienced generalists and specialists in the competency domain (e.g., strategic, marketplace analysis)
    • Larger organizations can support higher levels of specialization
    • Smaller organizations may be more dependent on generalists and hybrid BAs (i.e., possess knowledge across multiple professional domains)
  • Forces changing the BA role
    42
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Four Stages of EA
    43
    Source: Enterprise Architecture as Strategy, Harvard Business Press.
  • Implications for BA
    44
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Specialist BAs Will Be In Demand
    More companies will move to stages 3, 4, and beyond
    Generalist, project-oriented BA will remain but not be alone
    Top talent will gravitate to successful companies
    Other roles than these will likely emerge
    45
  • Focus and Orientation Change
    46
    © International Institute of Business Analysis®
  • Getting it Right
    Three key stakeholders are needed to get it right.
    Business Leaders
    Managers of Business Analysts
    Business Analysts
    Together, you create an effect-ive management environment and community of practice
    47
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
  • Business Leaders
    Represent the Vision of the organization to Managers and BAs
    Empower your people to act
    Reward innovation – even if it fails
    Recognize that your success depends on your employee’s success
    Walk the walk - Formalize the role
    48
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
    • If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up the men to gather wood, divide the work and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea.
    • Antoine de Saint-Exupery
  • Managers of BAs
    Support the role of the BA
    Formalize the role
    Identify and fund training
    Establish a community of practice
    “Lead from the side”
    Step forward, to protect the team
    Step back, to give the team the credit
    Step aside, to let them do their jobs
    49
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
    • Unless commitments are made there are onlypromises and hopes… but no plans.
    • Peter Drucker
  • Business Analysts
    Be assertive, not an order taker
    Deliver on the Vision
    Keep the goal at the forefront
    Solutions, not documents
    Performance, not perfection
    50
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
    It’s not strongest of the species that survive, or the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change.
    Charles Darwin
  • Contact Information
    Kevin Brennan, cbap
    kevin.brennan@theiiba.org
    Twitter: @bainsight
    Get this presentation at
    http://bit.ly/BRFIIBA
    51
    © International Institute of Business Analysis™
    www.theiiba.org |community.theiiba.org| info@theiiba.org