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April 27 Ut Presentation

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I just recently presented an update on the solar market and global policies to UT. Enjoy!

I just recently presented an update on the solar market and global policies to UT. Enjoy!

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  • Some areas have more production potential than others, but luckily, not too many people live in those blue regions. (point out Germany, Spain, the US, and what we can see of Japan, because on the next slide we see ……

April 27  Ut Presentation April 27 Ut Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Growth of Distributed Solar Power Iga Hallberg - Vice President Business Development
    NYDOCS1 - #771442v40 /1
  • Energy Generation and the Terawatt (TW) Challenge
    Humanity uses 12 TW of power today
    1 TW = 1,000 GW (Gigawatts)
    World will need 15 TW by 2012
    Only 5 known sources of energy are available on a TW scale*
    Fossil fuels: Coal, oil, gas
    Nuclear fuels
    Solar
    Only inherently distributed solution
    No fuel cost
    *Prof. Nathan Lewis, http://nsl.caltech.edu/
  • Sun – Our Free Fuel!
    The earth receives more energy from the sun in just over one hour
    than the world uses in an entire year
  • Global solar resources
    4
  • Northern Suburb of Tokyo
  • Global Solar Demand
    Source: Jeffries International, 2010
  • Policy Driven Demand
    MW
  • PV and Renewable Incentives
    8
  • Source: Christopher O’Brien of Sharp Solar at EESI climate change meeting 2005
    Example of successful long term solar incentives
  • $8.0
    $0.3
    Today
    2020
    $6.0
    $0.2
    $4.0
    $0.1
    $2.0
    $0.0
    Growing Competitiveness of Solar
    California Tier 4(2)
    California Tier 5(2)
    Size of electricity market TWh a year(1)
    Denmark
    Netherlands
    Italy
    Grid Parity as of(3)
    Norway
    Germany
    Hawaii
    Japan
    United Kingdom
    Sweden
    Australia
    California
    Average power price per household ($/kWh(1))
    Cost per watt at peak hours ($/Wp(1))
    France
    Spain
    New York
    Finland
    Texas
    South Korea
    Greece
    China
    India
    1,000
    1,500
    2,000
    500
    Annual solar energy yield (kWh/kWp(1))
    Source: McKinsey.
    (1) kWh = kilowatt hour; kWp = kilowatt peak; TWh = terawatt hour; Wp = watt peak; the annual solar yield is the amount of electricity generated by a south-facing 1 kW peak-rated module in 1 year, or the equivalent number of hours that the module operates at peak rating.
    (2) Tier 4 and 5 are names of regulated forms of electricity generation and usage.
    (3) Unsubsidized cost to end users of solar energy equals cost of conventional electricity.
  • US Solar/DG Policy Progress
    Dramatic increase in the presence of DG friendly policies since 1990s
    FIT or Production incentives in 22 states
    Interconnection standards in 37 states
    Net metering policy in 42 states
    RPS with a DG/solar provision in 16 states
    DG/solar tax incentive in 46 states
    Loan/grant/rebate program in 45 states
  • RPS with Solar Provisions
    www.dsireusa.org / October 2009
    WA: double credit for DG
    NH: 0.3% solar-electric by 2014
    OR: 20 MW solar PV by 2020;
    double credit for PV
    MI: triple credit for solar
    MA: TBD
    OH: 0.5% solarby 2025
    NY: 0.1312% customer-sitedby 2013
    NV: 1.5% solar by 2025;
    2.4 to 2.45 multiplier for PV
    CO: 0.8% solar-electric by 2020
    NJ: 2.12% solar-electric by 2021
    IL: 1.5% solar PVby 2025
    UT: 2.4 multiplier
    for solar
    WV: various multipliers
    PA: 0.5% solar PV by 2020
    DE: 2.005% solar PV by 2019;
    triple credit for PV
    AZ: 4.5% DG by 2025
    MO: 0.3% solar-electric
    by 2021
    NC: 0.2% solarby 2018
    MD: 2% solar-electric in 2022
    DC: 0.4% solar by 2020;
    1.1 multiplier for solar
    NM: 4% solar-electric by 2020
    0.6% DG by 2020
    TX: double credit for non-wind(Non-wind goal: 500 MW)
    State renewable portfolio standard with solar / distributed generation (DG) provision
    State renewable portfolio goal with solar / distributed generation provision
  • In deregulated regions, fuel price depends on the marginal fuel
    Primary Fuel Type
    Hydro
    Coal
    Natural Gas
    Petro
    Discussion
    Marginal Fuel Type for Electricity Production
    • Prices of the fuel type that sets the marginal price of electricity most impact electricity price
    • Natural gas sets the price for electricity in the Northeast, California, and Texas
    • This coincides with the regions with the highest average electricity prices and regions with deregulated markets
    RMP
    Deregulated Regions
    Source: Energy Velocity, NERC ES&D
  • HelioVolt Introduction
    Commercializing high-efficiency thin-film modules based on a proprietary CIGS manufacturing process
    Founded in 2001 in Austin TX
    Headquarters, Manufacturing and R&D (122,400 sqft)
    20 MW manufacturing capacity
    Customer samples – Q1 2010; Certified product - Q3 2010
    Production ramp Factory 1 during H1 2010
    Production ramp Factory 2 during H1 2012
    15
  • Our Process vs. Alternatives
    Our Process
    Glass In
    Module Out
    GlassPreparation
    FASST® CIGSProcess
    ModuleFormation
    Final Assembly& Test
    Competitors’ CIGS Cell-Based Processes
    Substrate In
    Module Out
    SubstratePreparation
    CIGSProcess
    Contact & GridFormation
    Cell Cut & Sort
    Cell Stringing
    Final Assembly& Test
    Silicon Process
    Polysilicon
    Ingot
    Wafer
    Solar Cell
    Solar Module
    Source: Wall Street research.
  • Solar Product Availability
    Crystalline Silicon ~ 18% conversion efficiency
    Multi-crystalline Silicon ~ 14%
    Amorphous Silicon ~ 6-8%
    Flexible and rigid
    Cadmium Telluride ~ 9-10%
    First Solar capturing significant market share for central power applications
    CIS/CIGS ~10-12%
    New commercial availability entering the market in 2010
    85% of
    current market
    15% of
    current market
    but fastest
    growing segment
    17
  • HelioVolt Module Production Process
    Module Out
    FASST® CIGSProcess
    Final Assembly& Test
    ModuleFormation
    GlassPreparation
    Glass In
  • Competitive Manufacturing Cost Potential is Key!
    Asia Poly($/kg)
    Euro Poly($/kg)
    Asia Multi-Si
    Euro Multi-Si
    Integ. Multi-Si
    Super Mono Si
    a-Si
    CdTe
    CIGS
    Source: Greentech Media and Prometheus Institute.
  • Opportunities for a More Efficient Value Chain
    20
    Future Integrated Products
    Opportunity for
    Pre-engineered
    Solutions
    Financing
    PV Module Mfgr
    If own system
    Installer
    Integrator/ System Designer
    Inverter
    Mfgr
    Customer
    Mounting & Wiring System Mfgr
    If buy power
    Power Purchase Agreement
    LLC
    Opportunity for
    Integration & System
    Cost Reduction
    Financing
  • Solar Systems Around the World
    Commercial Roof Top Systems
    Utility Scale
    Google HQ - California
    Solar farm - Germany
    Building Integrated
    Austin City Hall
    Residential roof - California
    Hong Kong Science Center
    21
  • Atlantic City Convention Center, NJ
    2.3MW Largest rooftop solar PV project in North America
    22
  • Example: Correlation between Daily PV Power Production and Energy Consumption of an Office Building in Spain
    Source: RWE Energie AG and RSS GmbH
    23
  • In Summary – Rapidly Growing Global Market
    Tremendous cost reductions making solar energy more affordable than ever
    Grid parity in many markets
    Financial services innovation and business models developing – PPAs, PACE
    Technological breakthroughs and system integration continuing to drive low cost of solar energy
    Key! - long term efficiency and reliability with exceptional performance
  • Thank you!Iga Hallberg512-767-6030ihallberg@heliovolt.com
  • World’s Highest Performance,
    Lowest Cost, & Most Versatile
    Solar Power Platform
    NYDOCS1 - #771442v40 /26