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Helicopter Training                         Federal Aviation                                            Administration    ...
Federal Aviation        Rotor Rooter:            Administration         Rooting for        Autorotational          Success...
Objective   Explore how acronyms, checklists and other   memory aids can help mitigate risk associated   with autorotation...
Ground RulesParticipateAsk questionsDon’t throw anything at the moderatorMake it personalAchieve one or two takeaways...
From what Perspective….. Pilot-to-Pilot Instructor-to-Instructor As a Safety Advocate As an Educator As an EvaluatorP...
What started all this madness….?    Professional Pilot Development begins in    the early phases of flight Instruction…Law...
False Sense of Urgency!!!!!!! Self-imposed….. Anxiety generates urgency Instructors get impatient, so expectations  bec...
Inattention and ComplacencyQuestion: If we can standardize everything,why can’t we mitigate mediocrity from ourperformance...
Reasons for our complacencyComplacency sets in because….we want to do it ourway, we know best, the environment changes, we...
Teaching and Using Checklists                                                      cklliistt                              ...
Comments made about checklists…..  They’re a crutch....  I’ve got thousands of hours, so I don’t need   checklists….  T...
Practical Test Standards                                            PTS                                            PTS    ...
Checklist DisciplineThe use of the word “checklist” in PTS  – 76 times: Instructor PTS  – 50 times: Private PTS  – 48 time...
Percentage Share of Accidents byIndustry/Mission (Years 2000, 2001, 2006)1.    Personal/Private       18.5 percent2.    In...
Percentage Share of Accidents by Activity(Years 2000, 2001, 2006)1.   Instructional/Training 22.8 percent2.   Positioning/...
So why ACRONYMS? They’re fun and simple memory aids They’re inexpensive They help us complete and prioritize tasks  (cr...
Pre-flight Autorotation Briefing                       “PRE-AUTOS”• P = Progressive Approach to Autorotations• R = Recover...
In-flight Pre-Autorotation Setup BriefingAcronym….”HASEL” check• H = Height AGL (appropriate entry altitudes)• A = Area cl...
Autorotation Scanning Acronym….(RATS)• R = Rotor• A = Airspeed• T = Trim• S = SpotPoints: Repeat the acronym over and ove...
Risk Assessment Acronym                                                  I…lliness                                        ...
Preflight: Be attentive and never trustanyone with your fluids or hatches….<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide>  ...
Positive Influence-”We never read about theaccidents that never happened” • Quantifying the positives… • Glass half-full m...
Which path are you going to take?<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide>     Federal Aviation   23<Date of Presentat...
Questions<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide>        Federal Aviation   24<Date of Presentation – Change on Maste...
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Rotor Rooting for Autorotational Success

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International Helicopter Safety Team (IHST) workshop presentation from HeliExpo 2013

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  • Concept Design: June Tonsing -314-890-4815 Ist Slide for Fixed wing Presentation Collaboration: Kevin Clover, Steve Keesey, Steve Sparks, Phil Dixon, Pat Knight, June Tonsing Producer: Felice Brunner This Presentation has duplicate slides in certain places to be customized at the local level for Audience type. And Regional issues to be added by AOR FPM.
  • Concept Design: June Tonsing -314-890-4815 1 st slide for Helicopter audience Presentation Collaboration: Kevin Clover, Steve Keesey, Dr. Steven Sparks, Phil Dixon, Pat Knight, June Tonsing Producer: Felice Brunner This is the first in a series of FAASTeam Loss of Control educational outreach presentations. These concepts are meant to encourage awareness for Designees, CFIs and any other airman delivering training, checking or practicing maneuvers. The main thought process is that the maneuver should not be initiated if the aircraft is already outside of the MIE envelope. The maneuver should be stopped if prior to completion the aircraft will move outside of the MIE. The next few slides will discuss the components of the MIE and a few [but not the only] mitigation strategies.
  • One of the standards that Successful CFIs infuse into their Core Values is: Customer Satisfaction: No Student wants to be treated badly, treat them with respect and as if they are your sole means of support… word gets around that you don’t treat your students with due care and respect… they will be…but not for long. Also; Customer Service is often lacking in the Instructor/Student relationship, the student is paying for a thorough professional service and has expectations and personal goals… If you are seen as “just Passing through” on your way to the Airline… you will soon be “passed over” by potential new students who are searching for the “Right CFI”
  • One of the standards that Successful CFIs infuse into their Core Values is: Customer Satisfaction: No Student wants to be treated badly, treat them with respect and as if they are your sole means of support… word gets around that you don’t treat your students with due care and respect… they will be…but not for long. Also; Customer Service is often lacking in the Instructor/Student relationship, the student is paying for a thorough professional service and has expectations and personal goals… If you are seen as “just Passing through” on your way to the Airline… you will soon be “passed over” by potential new students who are searching for the “Right CFI”
  • #3 CFI Complacency - Often it is a struggle to instill in the instructors the importance of &quot;being in the moment&quot;.  Far to often they act on impulse without performing the maneuver in their head prior to initiating some action in the helicopter ie. forced landing.  This usually results in a situation they are not expecting, causing the instructor and the student to be behind the helicopter.
  • #3 CFI Complacency - Often it is a struggle to instill in the instructors the importance of &quot;being in the moment&quot;.  Far to often they act on impulse without performing the maneuver in their head prior to initiating some action in the helicopter ie. forced landing.  This usually results in a situation they are not expecting, causing the instructor and the student to be behind the helicopter.
  • As The Instructor is the revered leader in most aviation communities …believed to accomplish the leaping of tall buildings and such… It is important that the CFI know that they are being observed and emulated… So the CFI must use the checklists too…the appropriate/timely use of &quot;checklists&quot; before maneuvers are initiated-when appropriate of course. More specifically, We often see the lack of pilot discipline in thoroughly briefing an instrument approach prior to beginning this highly demanding phase of flight (approach &amp; landing). The margin of safety is greatly diminished because of this unfortunate tendency. As revealed in loss of control studies, the amount/degree of task requirement placed on pilots during the approach and landing phase of flight greatly increases and sometimes exceeds a pilot&apos;s true capability. This unfortunately places them, their aircraft and passengers outside the safety envelope.    the aviation community often gets tunnel vision in believing maneuvering flight only involves VFR maneuvering and doesn&apos;t fully include IFR maneuvering into their overall Risk Management reduction strategy when it comes to reducing loss of control accidents.  
  • One of the standards that Successful CFIs infuse into their Core Values is: Customer Satisfaction: No Student wants to be treated badly, treat them with respect and as if they are your sole means of support… word gets around that you don’t treat your students with due care and respect… they will be…but not for long. Also; Customer Service is often lacking in the Instructor/Student relationship, the student is paying for a thorough professional service and has expectations and personal goals… If you are seen as “just Passing through” on your way to the Airline… you will soon be “passed over” by potential new students who are searching for the “Right CFI”
  • Keep the Practical Test Standards in mind as you train and test. These windows of proficiency were developed with consideration to assure the airman has full command authority over the aircraft, [Knowledge AND Skills] Often we find that CFIs resort to accepting minimum performance and preparing students only to pass the checkride; one solution to this unprofessional behavior is for the CFI to embrace techniques that…concentrate their teaching utilizing scenarios and assuring full student comprehension of the need to master each maneuver, includes technical skill AND knowledge.
  • We all have memories of our CFI sitting in the cool air-conditioned or Warm [in winter] Briefing area … while we struggle with many unanswered questions during pre-flight. The CFI should attend each and every student pr-flight… there are so many teachable moments that occur in this time…
  • Transcript of "Rotor Rooting for Autorotational Success"

    1. 1. Helicopter Training Federal Aviation Administration Educational Series Rotor Rooter Dr. Steve Sparks Updated 3/05/13 @ 8:33 AMPresented to:By:Date:
    2. 2. Federal Aviation Rotor Rooter: Administration Rooting for Autorotational Success Acronyms, checklists and memory aids.…a trip down memory lanePresented to:By:Date:
    3. 3. Objective Explore how acronyms, checklists and other memory aids can help mitigate risk associated with autorotations….and other helicopter training maneuvers.<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 3<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    4. 4. Ground RulesParticipateAsk questionsDon’t throw anything at the moderatorMake it personalAchieve one or two takeawaysHave fun<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 4<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    5. 5. From what Perspective….. Pilot-to-Pilot Instructor-to-Instructor As a Safety Advocate As an Educator As an EvaluatorPoint: What happens in Vegas….shouldn’t stay in Vegas!<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 5<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    6. 6. What started all this madness….? Professional Pilot Development begins in the early phases of flight Instruction…Law of Primacy -My instructor’s influence! Checklists and prioritization in the cockpit….<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 6<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    7. 7. False Sense of Urgency!!!!!!! Self-imposed….. Anxiety generates urgency Instructors get impatient, so expectations become unrealistic… We associate efficiency with quicknessPoint  “Extra seconds” invested in a thorough setup can pay huge dividends! <Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 7 <Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    8. 8. Inattention and ComplacencyQuestion: If we can standardize everything,why can’t we mitigate mediocrity from ourperformance?Question: How can we enhance ourperformance in the cockpit by “remembering”to do the basics?Recurring accidents….what are the positives?<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 8<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    9. 9. Reasons for our complacencyComplacency sets in because….we want to do it ourway, we know best, the environment changes, we getin a hurry, we believe nothing bad can happen to us,checklists and procedures go out the window, we gotaway with it before, rules and regulations don’t applyto us, we’re better than the average pilot, we getbored, we want to try something new……<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 9<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    10. 10. Teaching and Using Checklists cklliistt he ck s C he C<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 10<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    11. 11. Comments made about checklists…..  They’re a crutch....  I’ve got thousands of hours, so I don’t need checklists….  The flight environment is too dynamic for checklists….I’ll just do my flows!  They’re too bulky…. Flight hours do not equate to perfection!<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 11<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    12. 12. Practical Test Standards PTS PTS Required use of checklists<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 12<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    13. 13. Checklist DisciplineThe use of the word “checklist” in PTS – 76 times: Instructor PTS – 50 times: Private PTS – 48 times: Commercial PTS – 35 times: ATP PTS – 19 times: Instrument PTS Checklist usage is required!<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 13<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    14. 14. Percentage Share of Accidents byIndustry/Mission (Years 2000, 2001, 2006)1. Personal/Private 18.5 percent2. Instructional/Training 17.6 percent3. Aerial Application 10.3 percent4. EMS 7.6 percent5. Commercial 7.5 percent6. Law Enforcement 6.5 percent<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 14<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    15. 15. Percentage Share of Accidents by Activity(Years 2000, 2001, 2006)1. Instructional/Training 22.8 percent2. Positioning/RTB 13.2 percent3. Personal/Private 12.4 percent4. Passenger/Cargo 9.8 percent5. Aerial Application 9.0 percent13. EMS 1.1 percent<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 15<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    16. 16. So why ACRONYMS? They’re fun and simple memory aids They’re inexpensive They help us complete and prioritize tasks (critical/noncritical & obvious/not so obvious) They just stick…. They give the evaluator a glimpse into your thought process…”what is he/she going to do next”? <Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 16 <Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    17. 17. Pre-flight Autorotation Briefing “PRE-AUTOS”• P = Progressive Approach to Autorotations• R = Recovery gates (300, 200 & 100 feet AGL)• E = Environment• A = Airspeeds• U = Understanding the principles of an autorotation• T = Techniques• O = rOtor limitations/warning sounds• S = SAFE (Spot, ATC, Fight Instructor intervention, Engine) <Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 17 <Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    18. 18. In-flight Pre-Autorotation Setup BriefingAcronym….”HASEL” check• H = Height AGL (appropriate entry altitudes)• A = Area clear of hazards• S = Setup and security• E = Engine/system parameters• L = Look out for traffic & obstacles <Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 18 <Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    19. 19. Autorotation Scanning Acronym….(RATS)• R = Rotor• A = Airspeed• T = Trim• S = SpotPoints: Repeat the acronym over and over (prevents fixation) Go-around early if the picture is not right…. Plan-Continuation-Basis (PCB). “I can salvage this maneuver” <Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 19 <Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    20. 20. Risk Assessment Acronym I…lliness M…edication S…tress A…lcohol F…atigue E…ating<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 20<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    21. 21. Preflight: Be attentive and never trustanyone with your fluids or hatches….<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 21<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    22. 22. Positive Influence-”We never read about theaccidents that never happened” • Quantifying the positives… • Glass half-full mentality…actually the helicopter industry’s glass is 99.2% full of safety success stories…really! • Everyone in this audience has influence…..Student Pilots….Commercial Pilots…and Instructors (You are the ones we are trying to reach) <Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 22 <Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    23. 23. Which path are you going to take?<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 23<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
    24. 24. Questions<Presentation Title – Change on Master Slide> Federal Aviation 24<Date of Presentation – Change on Master Slide> Administration
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