Final Session: Making cities resilient campaign by UNISDR
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  • The campaign is aimed at reaching at least thousand cities to sign-up to the ten campaign essentials and identify activities and plans to improve the city resilience. It aims at Mayors / Governors / Commissioners and City Councils in the first instance. But the campaign is also addressing technical staff and national authorities responsible for local and urban development planning and disaster risk management and reduction. <br /> The term ‘city’ refers to urban areas in general, and the term ‘local government’ includes both urban and rural communities of different scales (i.e. regional, provincial, metropolitan, cities, towns, municipalities, districts and villages). <br />
  • 30-May-10"Global launch event for the campaign Resilient Cities 2010 - ICLEI First World Congress on Cities and Adaptation to Climate Change, and Mayors’ Adaptation Forum. 28-30 May, Bonn, Germany" <br /> Throughout 2010, the campaign was launched in all regions. Within one year, more than 30 national and regional launches took place and many more are planned in 2011. <br /> Participating City – need to submit a letter from the city council or mayors office confirming the participation in the campaign and nomination form <br /> Role model city – in addition to documents listed above, role models need to be willing to share their experiences by organising a city-to-city learning for example, Role models need to have the highest score in 5 of the 10 essentials <br />
  • Participating Cities <br /> All cities and local governments that are interested in participating in the campaign are encouraged to sign-up through isdr-campaign@un.org. By doing so, they will be requested to send the nomination form and to identify area of action in the campaign in relation to the “ten essentials for city resilience”. <br /> A letter from the Mayor’s office to UNISDR shall confirm the participation in the campaign, indicating which other organizations the city will engage during the campaign. <br /> UNISDR encourages the Mayor’s office to seek the approval of the City Council to be officially involved as a “participating city” in the campaign. The local government shall inform the central government about the participation and notify the official Hyogo Framework for Action focal point or the National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (contact information can be requested from UNISDR secretariat.) <br /> NEW SYSTEM in about 2-3 months – online form (see later – HFA monitor) <br /> Role Models <br /> Cities or local governments that already demonstrated good practices and innovation in becoming more resilient to disasters can express their interest to become a “role model” city in the campaign. <br /> Cities or local governments that are interested to showcase results or initiated processes for change in at least five areas out of the ten essential actions in the resilient cities “Ten-point checklist of Essentials for Making Cities Resilient” (Annex 1) shall send, in addition to the nomination form, a clear motivation letter to UNISDR explaining why this city or local government could serve as “role model” in the campaign. At least one additional stakeholder (from the academia, civil society or the private sector) shall be involved as an active partner of the designated city / local government in the campaign. <br />
  • As agreed upon during a high-profile Conference sponsored by the City of Incheon in Rep of Korea in August 2009, the objective of the campaign is to engage Mayors and city councils and their local government associations for them to: <br /> KNOW MORE: Raise the awareness of citizens and local governments on risk reduction options and urban risk <br /> INVEST WISELY: Raise political commitment among national and local governments for services and infrastructure projects and budgets to include disaster risk reduction aspects <br /> BUILD MORE SAFELY: Promote participatory urban development planning and protect critical infrastructure <br /> To achieve this, UNISDR has seized opportunities to mobilizing partners and coordinating awareness raising activities, political commitment and technical <br />
  • Central to the "Making Cities Resilient" campaign is the spread of alliances and networks for disaster risk reduction. Campaign partners will promote urban disaster resilience in their areas of influence. They will draw upon one another’s expertise as well as provide support and give substance to the advocacy, political and technical dimensions of the campaign.Official partners: <br /> support, the campaign within the capacity of their organization, by at a minimum designating a campaign focal point, circulating information to their members and linking to the campaign website <br /> promote the objectives and principles of the campaign through 2011 in local, national, regional and global fora <br /> share relevant experiences, best practices, tools or resources and technical information related to all aspects of urban resilience <br /> participate in national, regional and global fora in support of the campaign <br />
  • Participating Cities <br /> All cities and local governments that are interested in participating in the campaign are encouraged to sign-up through isdr-campaign@un.org. By doing so, they will be requested to send the nomination form and to identify area of action in the campaign in relation to the “ten essentials for city resilience”. <br /> A letter from the Mayor’s office to UNISDR shall confirm the participation in the campaign, indicating which other organizations the city will engage during the campaign. <br /> UNISDR encourages the Mayor’s office to seek the approval of the City Council to be officially involved as a “participating city” in the campaign. The local government shall inform the central government about the participation and notify the official Hyogo Framework for Action focal point or the National Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction (contact information can be requested from UNISDR secretariat.) <br /> NEW SYSTEM in about 2-3 months – online form (see later – HFA monitor) <br /> Role Models <br /> Cities or local governments that already demonstrated good practices and innovation in becoming more resilient to disasters can express their interest to become a “role model” city in the campaign. <br /> Cities or local governments that are interested to showcase results or initiated processes for change in at least five areas out of the ten essential actions in the resilient cities “Ten-point checklist of Essentials for Making Cities Resilient” (Annex 1) shall send, in addition to the nomination form, a clear motivation letter to UNISDR explaining why this city or local government could serve as “role model” in the campaign. At least one additional stakeholder (from the academia, civil society or the private sector) shall be involved as an active partner of the designated city / local government in the campaign. <br />
  • Champions <br /> Partners in the Campaign, National Platforms or city councils can recommend a personality to UNISDR as a ”Champion” for the Making Cities Resilient Campaign. This provides for leadership and visibility; it is also a non-remunerated designation. The characteristics for such a nominee should be as follows: <br /> A high profile leader with the ability to mobilize others and influence policy or action at the national, local and/or community level (i.e. Mayor, Governor, community leader, artist, etc). <br /> - Associated to a local government (i.e. province, district, city, municipality, township or village) with relevant experience in disaster risk reduction or demonstrated commitment to the Campaign objectives. <br /> - Be committed to contribute time to support the campaign in their own capacity, by participating in international, regional and/or national high-profile meetings, dialogues and awareness raising events. <br /> - Be able to effectively convey messages to reach people at risk as well as policy and decision makers. <br />
  • Chengdu, China (11 May 2011) - Role model for resilient development <br /> Bhubaneswar, India (11 May 2011) - Role model for community preparedness <br /> Mumbai, India (11 May 2011) - Role model for flood protection and urban regeneration <br /> Governorate of Albay, Philippines (11 May 2011) - Role model for institutionalized and innovative disaster risk management <br /> San Francisco, Philippines (5 May 2011) - Role model for grassroots disaster management <br /> Hyogo Prefecture, Japan (13 Oct 2010) <br /> Bangkok, Thailand (13 Oct 2010) <br />
  • Introduction <br /> The UNISDR Secretariat has been assisting regional, national and local governments in monitoring and reviewing their status and progress in the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) through a multi-tier progress monitoring and review process. The multi-tier monitoring framework is currently supporting the HFA review process at the national and regional level. This concept note outlines the proposed methodology of the third tier monitoring framework that focuses on the review process at the local level1 (i.e. municipalities, cities, provinces and so forth). <br /> At the national level, a monitoring framework and a web-based system (the HFA Monitor 2 ) are available since 2008 to facilitate the monitoring of the HFA implementation. More than 100 countries have been carrying out HFA review processes with multi stakeholder engagement at the national level. A similar monitoring framework is available for regional inter-governmental organizations at the sub-regional level to facilitate the regional and sub-regional HFA review process. <br /> In May 2010, the UNISDR secretariat and some key partners have also launched the Global Campaign “Making Cities Resilient – My City is Getting Ready!” The campaign will seek to convince city leaders and local governments to commit to a checklist of ”Ten Essentials”3 for Making Cities Resilient and to work alongside local activists, grassroots networks and national authorities. <br /> Stakeholders: Who does the review process? <br /> The local HFA review process is intended to be a multi-stakeholder review process led by the local governments4 at the local level. The main actors of this multi-stakeholder local HFA review process are local government authorities, civil society organizations, community based organizations and so forth. The involvement of civil society organizations and community based organizations is essential to the success of the review process and thus all local authorities are highly encouraged to ensure adequate participation of civil society and community based organizations in the consultations. <br /> Mechanics: How will the review process work? <br /> Local specific indicators: The local HFA review process will be carried out through a web based on-line system as well as a paper based template. The on-line system and the template is being developed by the UNISDR secretariat in consultation with relevant partners, including local government representatives, representatives of the Global NGO Network and other campaign partners. <br /> The on-line local HFA monitor will be based on a set of local context specific indicators, in the shape of a questionnaire. In view of the diversified target audience ranging from city/municipality authorities to rural provincial authorities, the same set of local indicators has been aligned to both the HFA priority areas as well as to the Ten Essentials of the city campaign. Local indicators are therefore presented in the above two different formats, as illustrated in ANNEX I and II of this document. <br /> On-line Local HFA monitor: The on-line system will be hosted on the www.preventionweb.net website and will be accessible to the participating local and city authorities. Access to the on-line system will be managed through a registration process facilitated by the UNISDR regional offices. Each user will be provided a unique User ID and Password to access the system. The indicators/questions will be presented in both the formats (aligned to HFA priorities and to the Campaign Ten Essentials) and will be available on-line as well as off-line. All inputs from the Local HFA review process will feed in to the national and regional HFA monitoring process. <br /> Feedback through pilot process: The Local HFA monitoring and review process will be rolled out by December 2010 for all local authorities globally. However, in order to demonstrate the complementarity between the local, national and city monitoring process, UNISDR in partnership with DG ECHO and the Global Network of Civil Societies for Disaster Risk Reduction will actively support the process in five pilot countries (i.e. Armenia, Indonesia, Mozambique, Nepal and Peru). The main aim of the pilot initiative will be to facilitate the multi-stakeholder engagement process involving local authorities, civil society organisations and the national government; <br /> and to draw lessons and gather feedback on the indicators, tools and methodology at the same time. <br />
  • Mention reporing cycle and linkages <br /> Enrichment of reports through data from different levels assessed by multi-stakeholder consultations <br />
  • Introduction <br /> The UNISDR Secretariat has been assisting regional, national and local governments in monitoring and reviewing their status and progress in the implementation of the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) through a multi-tier progress monitoring and review process. The multi-tier monitoring framework is currently supporting the HFA review process at the national and regional level. This concept note outlines the proposed methodology of the third tier monitoring framework that focuses on the review process at the local level1 (i.e. municipalities, cities, provinces and so forth). <br /> At the national level, a monitoring framework and a web-based system (the HFA Monitor 2 ) are available since 2008 to facilitate the monitoring of the HFA implementation. More than 100 countries have been carrying out HFA review processes with multi stakeholder engagement at the national level. A similar monitoring framework is available for regional inter-governmental organizations at the sub-regional level to facilitate the regional and sub-regional HFA review process. <br /> In May 2010, the UNISDR secretariat and some key partners have also launched the Global Campaign “Making Cities Resilient – My City is Getting Ready!” The campaign will seek to convince city leaders and local governments to commit to a checklist of ”Ten Essentials”3 for Making Cities Resilient and to work alongside local activists, grassroots networks and national authorities. <br /> Stakeholders: Who does the review process? <br /> The local HFA review process is intended to be a multi-stakeholder review process led by the local governments4 at the local level. The main actors of this multi-stakeholder local HFA review process are local government authorities, civil society organizations, community based organizations and so forth. The involvement of civil society organizations and community based organizations is essential to the success of the review process and thus all local authorities are highly encouraged to ensure adequate participation of civil society and community based organizations in the consultations. <br /> Mechanics: How will the review process work? <br /> Local specific indicators: The local HFA review process will be carried out through a web based on-line system as well as a paper based template. The on-line system and the template is being developed by the UNISDR secretariat in consultation with relevant partners, including local government representatives, representatives of the Global NGO Network and other campaign partners. <br /> The on-line local HFA monitor will be based on a set of local context specific indicators, in the shape of a questionnaire. In view of the diversified target audience ranging from city/municipality authorities to rural provincial authorities, the same set of local indicators has been aligned to both the HFA priority areas as well as to the Ten Essentials of the city campaign. Local indicators are therefore presented in the above two different formats, as illustrated in ANNEX I and II of this document. <br /> On-line Local HFA monitor: The on-line system will be hosted on the www.preventionweb.net website and will be accessible to the participating local and city authorities. Access to the on-line system will be managed through a registration process facilitated by the UNISDR regional offices. Each user will be provided a unique User ID and Password to access the system. The indicators/questions will be presented in both the formats (aligned to HFA priorities and to the Campaign Ten Essentials) and will be available on-line as well as off-line. All inputs from the Local HFA review process will feed in to the national and regional HFA monitoring process. <br /> Feedback through pilot process: The Local HFA monitoring and review process will be rolled out by December 2010 for all local authorities globally. However, in order to demonstrate the complementarity between the local, national and city monitoring process, UNISDR in partnership with DG ECHO and the Global Network of Civil Societies for Disaster Risk Reduction will actively support the process in five pilot countries (i.e. Armenia, Indonesia, Mozambique, Nepal and Peru). The main aim of the pilot initiative will be to facilitate the multi-stakeholder engagement process involving local authorities, civil society organisations and the national government; <br /> and to draw lessons and gather feedback on the indicators, tools and methodology at the same time. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1 and 4] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />
  • [HFA 1] - The number denotes the HFA priority area under which the essential falls. <br />

Final Session: Making cities resilient campaign by UNISDR Final Session: Making cities resilient campaign by UNISDR Presentation Transcript

  • www.unisdr.org/campaign www.unisdr.org/campaign “Making Cities Resilient” Campaign Michele Cocchiglia, UNISDR, 14 November 2013 DRR Practitioners Workshop – Bangkok, 13-14 November 2013
  • What role for Local Governments? Views from the Frontline report “A significant gap between national and local level action. Reports of (HFA) progress fade as activities get closer to vulnerable people – overall progress at community level is very limited“ HFA Mid Term Review: “Action at local level was consistently noted as in need of improvement, especially under Priorities for Action 1 to 4” “Effective action must link regional, national, sub-national, and local levels”
  • Campaign Launch in May 2010 Global Launch: 30 May 2010, Bonn, Germany Mayors from all regions signed up to the 10 campaign essentials More than 40 signing ceremonies worldwide
  • +1500 Europe Central Asia 380 … local governments participate in the campaign from over 80 countries Wildfire idea: Self motivating – self measuring Americas 100 Africa 29 Arab States 69 Pacifc Asia 10 Over 400
  • Campaign Objectives  Achieve resilient, sustainable communities through actions taken by local governments to reduce disaster risk Know More Invest Wisely Build More Safely
  • Ten-Point Checklist: Essentials for Making Cities Resilient 1. Put in place organization & coordination to clarify everyone’s roles & responsibilities. 2. Assign a budget & provide incentives for homeowners, lowincome families, private sector to invest in risk reduction. 3. Update data on hazards & vulnerabilities, prepare & share risk assessments. 4. Invest in & maintain critical infrastructure, such as storm drainage. 5. Assess the safety of all schools and health facilities & upgrade these as necessary.
  • 6. Enforce risk-compliant building regulations & land use planning principles, identify safe land for low-income citizens. 7. Ensure education programmes & training on disaster risk reduction are in place in schools and local communities. 8. Protect ecosystems & natural buffers to mitigate hazards, adapt to climate change. 9. Install early warning systems & emergency management capacities. 10. After any disaster, ensure that the needs of the affected population are at the centre of reconstruction.
  • Partnerships in the Campaign Building an alliance of local governments with relevant actors -community groups, academic institutions, business associations, NGOs and CBOs to ensure participation in planning and decision-making for risk reduction.  City associations/networks: UCLG, EMI, CityNet, Metropolis, ICLEI  National Associations of Local Governments  National Platforms and HFA focal points  International partner institutions (UN agencies such as UN-Habitat, UNDP, ILO, WHO, World Bank, UNICEF and IFRC)  Civil society: Community-based organizations, NGOs, academic institutions, business associations…  Some regions have a network, task force or platform focusing on urban disaster risk reduction (e.g. Asia Task Force on Urban Risk)  Regional organizations  Donors (ECHO, GFDRR)
  • Wildfire idea: Self motivating – Self measuring Involve global, regional and national ISDR partners (e.g. National Platforms), urban/local partners (National Associations of Local Governments) Work with partners in country for follow-up Follow-up actions: provide induction training / learning
  • The Campaign in Asia and the Pacific  More than 400 local governments (provinces, cities districts, municipalities) have signed up  12 Role Models, 5 Champions  Three were awarded the 2011 UN Sasakawa Award for excellence in disaster risk reduction (San Francisco/ Philippines, Bhubaneshwar/India)  138,000 schools and hospitals pledged  Campaign adopted/endorsed by IGOs: ASEAN, SAARC  Peer learning events among local authorities  LG-SAT training and use being initiated (including training for ASEAN cities)
  • The Local Government Self Assessment Tool (LG-SAT): Provide a self-assessment tool and a feedback mechanism for local and city governments and facilitate the understanding of gaps and challenges in disaster risk reduction at the local level. Complement the national HFA monitoring and multistakeholder engagement process by providing information and an assessment of the situation from the local level. Present a “baseline” and a status report for cities and local governments that have committed to the Making Cities Resilient Campaign.
  • 1. Put in place organization & coordination to clarify everyone’s roles & responsibilities. [HFA 1] 1. Are local organizations (including local government) sufficiently equipped with capacities (knowledge, experience, official mandate) for climate and disaster risk reduction? 2. Are there partnerships between communities, private sector and local authorities to reduce risk? 3. Does the local government support local communities (particularly women, elderly, infirmed, children) to actively participate in risk reduction decision-making, policy making, planning and implementation processes? 4. Does the local government participate in the national DRR planning?
  • Level of progress per indicator question
  • Sample template online self assessment tool
  • 1. 1. Status will idicate the process – white circle=incomplete, black circle=completed 2. 2. Please indicate your progress in the different areas 3. Please discribe the achievments, the challenges and next steps 4. As soon as approved by multi-stakeholder group, please save submission per essential 3. 4.
  • Use of LG-SAT: Good Practice Example Makassar City, Indonesia • Multi-stakeholder consultations: community councilors and leaders (workshop); staff of different city departments (focus group discussion) and other stakeholders (integrated into Growth and Development Strategy process) • Results: complete Disaster Management SOP and establishment of Fast Response Team • Integrate LG-SAT into Disaster Management Agency’s Strategic Programmes of 2011-2014 • LG-SAT as strategic data for annual Makassar State of Environment Report (SoER) and Land Use and Economical Development Management (RTRW) 2011 – 2031 • Program synchronization of City departments
  • Thank you United Nations, secretariat of the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction isdr-campaign@un.org www.unisdr.org/campaign
  • Feedback on LG-SAT Process & Indicators Are the indicators comprehensible/self explanatory? If not, what are the recommendations for improving the set of indicators (in Bangla)? How can the Local Government Self Assessment be rolled-out at the national level? (the way forward) How could the results of the self assessment be utilized for disaster risk reduction and development planning at your city/municipality level?
  • Applying the LG-SAT – Workshop Discussion 1. What was the process undertaken in the reporting, what changes could you have made? 2. What were the challenges in reporting? 3. Suggestions on indicators/Key questions of reporting? 4. Suggestions for improvement to online tool? 5. Discuss on national roll out mechanism. Report back on main points of group discussion to all participants Plenary Discussion
  • 1. Put in place organization & coordination to clarify everyone’s roles & responsibilities. [HFA 1] 1. Are local organizations (including local government) sufficiently equipped with capacities (knowledge, experience, official mandate) for climate and disaster risk reduction? 2. Are there partnerships between communities, private sector and local authorities to reduce risk? 3. Does the local government support local communities (particularly women, elderly, infirmed, children) to actively participate in risk reduction decision-making, policy making, planning and implementation processes? 4. Does the local government participate in the national DRR planning?
  • 2. Assign a budget & provide incentives for homeowners, low-income families, private sector to invest in risk reduction. [HFA 1 and 4] 5. Are financial services (e.g. saving and credit schemes, macro and microinsurance) available to vulnerable and marginalised households for preand/or post-disaster times? 6. Are micro finance, cash aid, soft loans, lone guarantees etc available after disasters to restart livelihoods? 7. Do local business associations, such as chambers of commerce and similar, support efforts of small enterprises for business continuity during and after disasters? 8. Are there any economic incentives for DRR actions (e.g. reduced insurance premiums for households, tax holidays for businesses)? 9. Does the local government have access to adequate financial resources to carry out risk reduction activities?
  • 3. Update data on hazards & vulnerabilities, prepare & share risk assessments. [HFA 2, 3 and 4] 10. Has the local government conducted thorough disaster risk assessments for various development sectors in your local authority? 11. Are these regularly updated, e.g. annually or on a bi-annual basis? 12. Does local government regularly communicate to the community, information on local hazard trends and risk reduction measures (e.g. using a Risk Communications Plan) including early warnings of likely hazard impact? 13. Are local government risk assessments linked to, and supportive of, risk assessments from neighbouring local authorities and state or provincial government risk management plans? 14. Do communities have access to information on vulnerability, disaster risk reduction, climate change adaptation measures, forecasts and early warning etc, in your local authority? 15. Has the local government identified which livelihood (economic) sectors are the most vulnerable to the potential impacts of disasters?
  • 4. Invest in & maintain critical infrastructure, such as storm drainage. [HFA 4 and 5] 16. Do land use policies and planning regulations for housing and critical risk reducing infrastructure (i.e. drainage, flood controls) take current and projected climate risk and disaster risk into account? 17. Are critical public facilities and infrastructure located in high risk areas adequately assessed for all hazard risks and safety? 18. Have adequate measures been undertaken to protect these facilities and infrastructure from damage during disasters? 19. Does your local government have an emergency operations centre (EOC) and/or an emergency communication system?
  • 5. Assess the safety of all schools and health facilities & upgrade these as necessary. [HFA 2, 4 and 5] 20. Have local schools and hospitals received special attention for “all hazard” risk assessments in your local authority? 21. Are all main hospitals safe from disasters and have the ability to remain operational during emergencies? 22. Do the local government or other levels of government have special programs in place to regularly assess public infrastructure (especially schools & hospitals) for maintenance, seismic stability, general safety, weather related risks etc.? 23. Are regular disaster preparedness drills undertaken in schools?
  • 6. Enforce risk-compliant building regulations & land use planning principles, identify safe land for lowincome citizens. [HFA 4] 24. Are local government DRR policies, strategies and implementation plans included within existing land-use and development plans (including community-based disaster risk management)? 25. Are land use regulations and building codes, health and safety codes enforced across all development zones and building types? 26. Is there a need to build or strengthen existing regulations (e.g. land use, building codes etc) to support disaster risk reduction in your local authority?
  • 7. Ensure education programmes & training on disaster risk reduction are in place in schools and local communities. [HFA 1, 3 and 5] 27. Does the local government regularly conduct awareness-building or education programs on DRR and disaster preparedness for local community? 28. Does the local government provide in-depth training in risk reduction for local officials and community leaders? 29. Do local schools and colleges provide courses, education or training in disaster and climate risk reduction as part of the education curriculum? 30. Are citizens aware of evacuation plans or drills for evacuations when necessary?
  • 8. Protect ecosystems & natural buffers to mitigate hazards, adapt to climate change. [HFA 4] 31. Does the local government support the restoration, protection and sustainable management of ecosystems services (e.g. forests, coastal zones, wetlands, water resources, livestock, fisheries, riverbasins) to reduce local vulnerability and protection against floods, drought, landslides or seismic hazards? 32. Do civil society organizations and citizens support the restoration, protection and sustainable management of ecosystems services? 33. Is the private sector a contributor and supporter of environmental and ecosystems management in your local authority?
  • 9. Install early warning systems & emergency management capacities. [HFA 2 and 5] 34. Do local institutions have access to financial reserves and essential emergency provisions to support effective disaster response and early recovery? 35. Are early warning centres established, adequately staffed (or on-call personnel) and well resourced (power back ups, equipment redundancy etc.) at all times? 36. Are regular training drills and rehearsal carried out with the participation of relevant government, non-governmental, local leaders and volunteers? 37. Are sufficient amounts of emergency supplies (stockpiles of relief supplies) available at all times? 38. Are emergency shelters available? 39. Are safe evacuation routes identified, mapped and maintained and well communicated to the community? 40. Does a contingency plan or a community disaster preparedness plan exist for all major hazards?
  • 10. After any disaster, ensure that the needs of the affected population are at the centre of reconstruction. [HFA 4 and 5] 41. Does the local government have access to resources and expertise to assist victims of psycho-social (psychological, emotional) impacts of disasters? 42. Are disaster risk reduction measures integrated into post-disaster recovery and rehabilitation activities (i.e. build back better, livelihoods rehabilitation)? 43. Does the Contingency Plan (or similar plan) include an outline strategy for post disaster recovery needs including assessment tools, immediate livelihoods rehabilitation etc.?
  • Thank you United Nations, secretariat of the International Strategy for Disaster Reduction isdr-campaign@un.org www.unisdr.org/campaign