'Engendering Agricultural Research'

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Presentation made by Ruth Meinzen Dick on March 30 2010 at the GCARD conference in Montpellier France

Presentation made by Ruth Meinzen Dick on March 30 2010 at the GCARD conference in Montpellier France

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  • Example (in full): In Kenya the cash constraints of many female farmers prevented them from taking measures to improve the fertility of poor soils. Research on biomass transfers and extension systems that recognized women’s low literacy levels, however, led women (as well as men) to adopt the transfers, which resulted not only in higher yields but also in increased soil organic matter (Place et al. 2007).
  • 2009 GHI: Correlation between countries with high levels of hunger and high levels of gender inequality Bangladesh Example: In Bangladesh, fish pond programs that were “gender blind” ended up reaching wealthier men, whereas fish pond and vegetable garden programs that targeted poor women empowered them and improved the long-term nutritional status of women and children as well as gender-asset equality more than untargeted programs (Hallman, Lewis, and Begum 2007; Kumar and Quisumbing 2009).
  • IF STATUS OF MEN AND WOMEN WERE EQUALIZED IN SOUTH ASIA, UNDERWEIGHT RATE AMONG CHILDREN < 3 Y WOULD DROP BY 13 PERCENTAGE POINTS, A REDUCTION OF 13.4 MILLION MALNOURISHED CHILDREN
  • When to address gender in Ag R&D? The process is often talked of as a “pipeline” (go through the steps)
  • The first change we need to make is to see that there are multiple actors at each stage in this process. CGIAR, NARES, private sector, and farmers themselves are all involved in each stage, in different ways, but we need to make these complementary.
  • Then we need to see these not as a “pipeline”, but as a cycle, with feedback loops And we need to put on a “gender lens” on each of these and see what differences that would make to the way we view each component
  • What would the agricultural R&D system look like if it were serving women as well as men, as producers and consumers?
  • Identifying strategic priorities for gender-equitable agricultural research, e.g. foods contributing to diverse and nutritious diets, underlying gender inequalities in access to resources—in order to unleash the full productivity of millions of female agricultural producers. Fully integrating gender into the agricultural R&D system, from priority setting and the conducting of research to extension, adoption, and evaluation of outcomes. Transforming the enabling conditions, including institutional structures and policies, to allow gender-equitable agricultural research to flourish. Necessary partnerships
  • Support for Gender Integration in MPs, providing expert review of proposals and progress reports, including on-the-ground diagnostic visits where needed, and development of standardized indicators and best practice for impact analysis; Strategic Gender Research delivering original research directly responsive to the priorities of rural women and men, including methodology development for best practices in sex-disaggregated data collection, participatory research, synthesis across MPs, policy and other “big-picture” analyses such as recently done for FAO’s State of Food and Agriculture report on gender; Capacity Building for Gender-Responsive R&D to build up the MPs’ internal skills for gender analysis across all stages of R&D, and for nourishing the talent pool for agricultural R&D; Institutional Strengthening Services to support the leadership’s development of conducive policies, staffing profiles, organizational culture and norms; and Incentives to encourage innovation through a competitive small grants program to facilitate innovative ideas for gender-responsive R&D, plus a biannual prize to the R&D team that best demonstrates positive impacts for gender-equitable development; and Information Services providing a clearinghouse for gender-related publications and resources, working to publicize lessons innovations throughout the system.
  • This is women’s history month. Let’s make history in agricultural research and development! Thank you for joining in this enterprise

Transcript

  • 1. Ruth Meinzen-Dick Agnes Quisumbing Julia Behrman Patricia Biermayr-Jenzano Vicki Wilde Marco Noordeloos Catherine Ragasa Nienke Beintema Engendering Agricultural Research
  • 2.
    • Why pay attention to gender in agriculture?
      • You cannot address poverty, especially in Africa and South Asia, without addressing gender issues
    • When to address gender in agriculture
      • Throughout the R&D cycle
    • What might a gender-equitable agricultural R&D system look like?
    • Conclusions & Way Forward
    Presentation Overview
  • 3. Why pay attention to gender in agriculture? A. To improve agricultural productivity & profitability
    • Women are essential to planting, weeding, harvesting, processing, marketing, food preparation etc.
    •  SE Asia: women up to 90 percent of the labor involved in rice cultivation (FAO 2007).
    •  SS Africa: women produce up to 80 percent of basic foodstuffs for household consumption and sale (FAO 2007).
    • However, women’s productivity is severely constrained by a lack of assets and inputs
  • 4. Women are disadvantaged with respect to:
    • LAND
    •  Women are disadvantaged in customary & statutory land tenure systems (Kevane 2004)
    • HUMAN CAPITAL
    •  Women in S. Asia and SS Africa routinely have less access to extension than males (WB & IFPRI 2010)
    • TECHNOLOGICAL RESOURCES
    •  Women throughout the globe have less access to essential agricultural inputs (Peterman et al 2009)
    Reducing inequality in human capital, physical capital and inputs between male and female farmers in SS Africa has the potential to increase agricultural productivity by 10-20% (Alderman, Haddad & Udry 1996 )
  • 5. Why pay attention to gender in agriculture? B. To increase agricultural sustainability
    • Women are the guardians of local knowledge on low impact, low cost climate change coping strategies
    • Example : Kenya, targeting female farmers & improved soil fertility
  • 6. Why pay attention to gender in agriculture? C. To improve food security & nutrition
    • Women control household food distribution & are the guardians of household food security.
    • Increasing the resources women control has been shown to improve child health and nutrition (Quisumbing 2003).
  • 7. Why pay attention to gender in agriculture? D. To reduce poverty through empowerment
    • Empowerment as “the expansion in people’s ability to make strategic life choices in context previously denied to them” (Kabeer 2000)
    • Link between high levels of hunger and gender inequality (GHI 2009)
    • Importance of empowering women through interventions. Example : targeting women in Bangladesh
  • 8. Impact of Empowerment: Contributions of Women’s Status and Education to Child Malnutrition (1970-95) Page Source: Smith and Haddad 2000 Equalizing women status in SSA would  malnutrition in children by 3 % (1.7 million children) Equalizing women status in S Asia would  malnutrition in children by 13 % (13.4 million children)
  • 9. Priority Setting Research & Development Extension Adoption Evaluation Gender in Agriculture R&D: The Old Perspective
  • 10. Priority Setting Research & Development Extension Adoption Evaluation Gender in Agriculture R&D: A New Perspective Farmers NARES CGIAR Farmers NARES CGIAR Farmers NARES CGIAR Farmers NARES CGIAR Farmers NARES CGIAR
  • 11. Priority Setting Research & Development Extension Adoption Evaluation Gender in Agriculture R&D: A New Perspective
  • 12. Basic Questions for Gender Integration
    • What different roles/stakes do women and men have in XXX?
    • How might the program affect them differently?
    • Will both men and women realistically be able to participate and to benefit? (time, assets etc.)
    • How might differential participation of men, women affect program activities and impact?
    • How could the program contribute to gender equity?
    Page
  • 13. How might agricultural R&D look through a “ gender lens ”?
    • 1.Involving women in agricultural research and development
    • 2. Going beyond production technology
  • 14. Beyond production technology…
    • Gender roles in natural resource management
    • Multiple uses of water
    • Non timber forest products
    • Energy includes cooking uses
  • 15. Beyond production technology…
    • An expanded concept of the food sector including gardens, fish, livestock, and water.
  • 16. Beyond production technology…
    • Postharvest processing (not just market-oriented)
    • Value chains
    • Linkages to health and nutrition
    • Supporting policies and institutions (addressing constraints to land ownership, credit, etc)
  • 17. A revitalized agricultural research syste m
    • Identify strategic priorities for gender-equitable agricultural research
    • Fully integrate gender into the agricultural R&D system
    • Transform the enabling conditions to allow gender-equitable agricultural research to flourish.
    • Build necessary partnerships
  • 18.
    • Key components for successful gender integration
    • Political will (including funds)
    • Technical capacity
    • Accountability mechanisms
    • Organizational culture
    • What does this mean for a revitalized agricultural R&D system?
    Conclusions and Way Forward
  • 19.
    • Key components for successful gender integration
    • Political will (including funds)
    • Technical capacity
    • Accountability mechanisms
    • Organizational culture
    • What does this mean for a revitalized agricultural R&D system?
    Conclusions and Way Forward
  • 20. Achieving the vision of a gender-responsive agricultural system Commitment, Accountability, Institutional change Strategic research, Methods, Capacity strengthening, Partnerships Management, Donors Agricultural Research and Development Programs Platform on Gender in Agriculture
  • 21. Proposed Platform Elements
    • Support for Gender Integration
    • Strategic Gender Research
    • Capacity Building for Gender-Responsive R&D
    • Institutional Strengthening Services
    • Incentives (small grants, prize)
    • Information Services
  • 22. Making History Together