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التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري
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التقويم في النظام اللا مركزي – النهج الابتكاري

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سامبو سوهكو …

سامبو سوهكو
نائب عمدة الخدمات التعليمية والثقافية،
مدينة إسبو
فنلندا

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  • 1. Evaluation in thedecentralised System –Innovative approachSampo Suihko
  • 2. Content of presentation•  Espoo – speakers homecourt•  Finnish necessity – education for all•  Perspective from a providers sight•  What are we evaluating – and why•  How we are evaluating2/26/132
  • 3. Backround of the speaker•  City of Espoo; Deputy Mayor of Education and Culture•  EUproVET, Chairman of the Board•  VET Finland, Vice-Chairman of the Board•  Finnish Education Evaluation Council; member of experts•  Quality Prize Committee; member of experts (vocationaleducation)•  International Coordination Committee; member of experts(Ministry of Education)•  EU Twinning project in Egypt; Project Leader”Strengthening the Institutional Capacity of theProductivity and Vocational Training Department”2/26/133
  • 4. The City of EspooMission Statement2/26/13A good place to live, learn, work and enterprise in.4The City of Espoo creates the preconditionsfor a good quality of life for residents andoffers enterprises an internationally competitiveoperational milieu that complies with theprinciples of sustainable development.
  • 5. Centrally located betweenEurope, Russia and AsiaEspooHelsinki RegionBangkok   9  h  45  minBeijing 7  h  40  minBerlin 1  h  55  minBrussels 2  h  40  minChicago 9  h  35  minCopenhagen 1  h  40  minFrankfurt 2  h  40  minHong  Kong 9  h  50  minLondon 3  h  10  minMoscow 1  h  45  minDelhi 6  h  45  minNew  York 8  h  40  minOsaka 9  h  35  minParis 3  h  05  minSeoul 8  h  45  minShanghai 8  h  55  minSingapore 11  h  30  minSt  Petersburg 1  hStockholm 55  minTokyo 9  h  40  minToronto 8  h  50  min
  • 6. A City like a Central Park•  The northern parts of Espoo are mainly fields andforests, recreation and conservation areas.•  Nuuksio National Park is only 20 km air distance awayfrom Nokia headquarters.•  Green space is never further away than 1 km.•  58 km coastline, 95 lakes and 165 islands2/26/13A good place to live, learn, work and enterprise in.6
  • 7. A High-Tech Economy•  Northern Europe’s largest high-tech hub in Otaniemi•  Over 20 % of jobs in ICT•  Biggest employers are the municipality, Nokia, the TechnicalResearch Centre of Finland VTT and the Aalto University•  More than 60 % of turnover at Helsinki Stock Exchange•  About 400 global companies and headquarters,including Nokia, Kone and Rovio2/26/13A good place to live, learn, work and enterprise in.7
  • 8. A Young andFast Developing City•  The population has increased tenfold in the last fifty yearsand by 2030 the population will grow by 24 % to 310,000.•  20 % of our residents are under 15 (EU 15,5 %).•  44 % of our residents over 15 have a university diploma (EU 23 %).•  Our international community will grow from 10 % to 17 % by 2030.2/26/13A good place to live, learn, work and enterprise in.8
  • 9. Highest quality education•  The City of Espoo offers qualityservices and versatilerecreational opportunities for itsresidents•  The second largest city inFinland (pop. around 260 000)•  As part of the metropolitan area,Espoo is globally recognised asa networked city with specialexpertise in high technology,education, culture, physicalexercise, research andinnovations2/26/13Finnish Education Unit9
  • 10. A Good City to Grow Up InA good place to live, learn, work and enterprise in.•  Decentralised day care: Small groups, always nearby•  Day care in Finnish, Swedish, English and French•  OECD: Finnish education is one of the best in the world•  Instruction in one’s mother tongue for 30 language groups•  Primary and secondary education in English•  International Baccalaureate (IB)
  • 11. A Multifaceted ProfessionalEducation EnvironmentMetropolia University of Applied SciencesLaurea University of Applied SciencesOmnia – Joint Authority of Education in Espoo Region
  • 12. A World-Class University•  Aalto University – Where Science and Art meet Technology and Business•  20,000 students, 340 professors, € 400M Budget•  Independent governance as foundation-based university•  Cooperation with e.g. Stanford University and Tongij University (CHN)•  Strategic partnerships with Microsoft, Nokia, PWC, Kone and others•  Aalto Center for Entrepreneurship
  • 13. Key figures of schools•  97 comprehensive schools with roughly 27 000 pupils–  83 Finnish-speaking comprehensive schools•  24 000 pupils, of which roughly 8 000 in middle schools•  about 2 000 teachers–  12 Swedish-speaking comprehensive schools•  about 2 600 pupils in total–  2 private schools•  11 Finnish-speaking general upper secondary schools–  About 4 600 students and roughly 300 teachers•  1 general upper secondary school for adults (about 1 500 students)•  1 Swedish-speaking general upper secondary school (about 500students)•  Several upper secondary vocational education and traininginstitutions, of which the largest is Omnia, about 10 000 students and 600teachers2/26/1313
  • 14. 2/26/13Finnish Education Unit14Pre-primary education•  Given in schools and day-care centres•  Lays emphasis on thepreparation for school•  Special attention is paid toreadiness for schoolattendance, i.e. to the phase ofthe child’s emotional, socialand cognitive development•  Approximately 98 % of Espoo’s6-year-olds attend pre-primaryeducation
  • 15. How the schools are run•  The Education and Cultural Services of Espoo organise basiceducation, pre-primary education and general upper secondaryeducation in the city and vocational education in the area togetherwith two other cities•  Teaching is provided in Finnish-speaking and Swedish-speaking schools that are administered in different units•  Both units•  are responsible for organising, evaluating and developingeducation in Finnish-speaking schools•  coordinate the organisation of student welfare and special supportto pupils•  arrange for continuing education to teachers in cooperation withthe schools2/26/1315
  • 16. Educational and Cultural Servicesexpenditure 2013 (676 EUR mil.)Finnish  Child  Day  Care  and  Education482  EUR  Mil.Swedish  Child  Day  Care  and  Education54  EUR  mil.Free  educational  work39  EUR  mil.Sports  and  Exercise31  EUR  mil.Urban  culture27  EUR  mil.Youth6  EUR  mil.Other  Educational  work27  EUR  mil.2/26/1316
  • 17. •  Every citizen has theright to receive education•  Basic education is freefor all•  The key words in Finnisheducation policy arequality, efficiency,equity andinternationalisation.2/26/1317The Finnish Education System
  • 18. The Finnish Education systemFlexibility and diversity•  School-based curriculum development,•  Steering by information and support.Emphasis on broad knowledge•  Equal value to all aspects of individual growth and learning:personality, morality, creativity, knowledge and skills.Trust through professionalism•  A culture of trust on teachers’ and headmasters’professionalism in judging what is best for studentsand in reporting of progress.2/26/13.18
  • 19. The Finnish Education System•  pre-primaryeducation•  nine years ofbasiceducation•  general uppersecondaryeducationor vocationaleducation andtraining•  highereducation•  adult education 2/26/1319
  • 20. 2/26/13Finnish Education Unit20Basic Education in short•  A nine-year comprehensivecurriculum for the wholeage group•  No degree; a finalcertificate will be given forcompleting the syllabus•  Teaching, text books andother materials, schooltransport and schoolmeals are free•  Provides the necessaryprerequisites for all uppersecondary education
  • 21. andreas schleicherHead of the indicators and analysis division at OECDIn the best performing countries•  Decentralized decision making is combined with devicesto ensure a fair distribution of substantive educationalopportunities•  The provision of standards and curricula at national /sub-national levels is combined with advancedevaluation systems•  Process-oriented assessments and/or centralised finalexaminations are complemented with individual reportsand feedback mechanisms on student learning process2/26/1321
  • 22. andreas schleicherIn the best performing countries•  Teacher training schemes are selective•  The training of pre-school personnel is closelyinegrated with the professional development ofteachers•  Continuing professional development is a constitutivepart of the system•  Special attention is paid to the professionaldevelopment of school management personnel2/26/1322
  • 23. andreas schleicherIn the best performing countries•  Students are offered a variety of extra curricular activities•  Schools offer differentiated support structures for students•  Institutional differentiation is introduced, if at all, at later stages•  Effective support systems are located at individual school levelor in specialised support institutions•  Schools and teachers have explicit strategies and approachesfor teaching heterogeneous groups of learners2/26/1323
  • 24. International evaluations•  PISA (Programme for International StudentsAssessments); OECD•  PIAAC (Programme for the International Assessment ofAdult Competencies), OECDThe International Association for the Evaluation ofEducational Achievement)•  PIRLS (Progress in International Reading LiteracyStudy)•  TIMSS (Trends in International Mathematics andScience Study•  European schoolnet evaluation2/26/1324
  • 25. Finnish Success – PISASince the launch of PISA Finland has scoredin the top five in all three components..2/26/13,.25
  • 26. PISA 2009; 65 countriesYoung Finns were again among the best performers in theassessment of reading, mathematical and scientific literacyA slight fall, but still among OECD topVariation in different aspects of readingGirls have a huge lead over boys in readingInterest in reading and mastery of strategies crucialVariation between schools still minimalMathematical literacy the same, scientific literacy falling slightly 2/26/13A26
  • 27. The roots for the Finnish success in PISA can besearched for in the history and rapid development ofthe Finnish well-fare state as well as in the boldeducation policy of the past forty years with itsemphasis on educational equality.2/26/1327
  • 28. Evaluation in Finnish education•  PISA scores are by-products, we do not teach toPISA•  The important role of self-evaluation•  Student centered approaches and inclusion•  Accomodating special needs in evaluation•  Use of modern technology and eg. eportfolios, classwikis and blogs•  Evaluation of teachers and schools - why ranking hasnot been a real issue in Finland2/26/1328
  • 29. National evaluations•  National questionnairs•  Local questionnairs•  Principles questionnairs•  Healthcare questionnairs•  Finnish evaluation committee•  UniversitiesNo school inspection.2/26/1329
  • 30. Why Finland succeeds?•  Education is highly valued in the society•  National (only!) core curricula•  Student support and wellfare•  School development is based on cooperation ofmany authorities and parents2/26/13Tapio Erma30
  • 31. Why Finland succeeds?•  Nationwide educational system•  Professional, excellent teachers•  Independancy of the schools•  Excellent free library-network in every city2/26/13Tapio Erma31
  • 32. 2/26/1332AutonomyDecentralizationState guidance
  • 33. 2/26/13Tapio Erma33No inspection – so how doesthe state guide ed?ProvidinginformationProjectsEvaluationTeachertrainingFinanceLegislationCurriculumAppealsNationaltests
  • 34. 2/26/13Finnish Education Unit34Curriculum•  The Finnish National Board ofEducation prepares the nationalcore curriculum for basic educationand general upper secondaryeducationà Municipalities compilemunicipality-specificcurriculaà Individual schoolsprepare their ownschool curricula
  • 35. Curriculum•  The Government defines the minimumnumber of lessons for core subjectsduring basic education–  In grades 1–6, pupils usually receivethe same education, but schoolsmay focus on different subjects indifferent ways due to the flexible timeallocation.–  In grades 7–9, more electivesubjects are included in thecurriculum.2/26/1335
  • 36. 2/26/1336Decentralization of thecurriculumCentralized DecentralizedCalEngBelG/NWFinNetSwePorSource: SLO 2005
  • 37. 2/26/1337A three-level curriculum1.  National core curriculum2.  Local curriculum3.  School-level curriculum
  • 38. 2/26/1338A three-level curriculum1.  National core curriculum2.  Local curriculumcity values, profiles, languageprogramme, structures forsupport, Espoo specificcontents3.  School-level curriculumoptional courses, learningunits, methods, evaluation
  • 39. Competent teachers•  On all school levels, teachers arehighly qualified and committed.•  A master’s degree is required.•  Teacher education includesteaching practice.•  The teaching profession is verypopular in Finland, and henceuniversities can select the mostmotivated and talented applicants.•  Teachers work independently andenjoy full autonomy in theclassroom.2/26/13Finnish Education Unit39
  • 40. Competent teachersInstruction may be given by•  kindergarten teacherso  pre-primary education in separate pre-primary classes•  class teacherso  instruction for grades 1–6 in basic education, teaching allsubjectso  may also give pre-primary education•  subject teacherso  teach one or several subjects in basic education (primarilyin grades 7–9) and/or in general upper secondary education•  special needs teachers and special class teacherso  instruction for children in need of special needs education•  pupil counsellors and student counsellorso  educational guidance in basic education and in generalupper secondary education.2/26/1340
  • 41. Basic Education, € / student16.1.201241v.2005 v.2006 v.2007 v.2008 v.2009 v.2010Espoo 5,817 6,218 6,605 7,247 7,343 8,407Helsinki 5,758 6,098 6,323 7,036 7,582 9,791Oulu 5,444 5,708 6,116 6,852 7,234 7,838Tampere 5,056 5,433 5,837 6,117 6,383 7,606Turku 5,452 5,749 5,852 6,357 6,585 7,614Vantaa 4,981 5,238 5,473 6,055 6,053 7,32302,0004,0006,0008,00010,00012,000
  • 42. Student associations -participation•  Pupils vote for a representative from each grade intothe board of the school’s student association•  The board plans presentations and proposals•  Improves everyday life at school from theperspective of pupils•  Develops the pupils’ possibilities to have aninfluence•  Improves the communal sprit of the school2/26/1342
  • 43. Youth guarantee 2013Society’s large-scale problems related to theeducation, employment and participation of youngpeople.Private-People Partnership approach based on whichyoung people themselves are active participants andmake decisions regarding their own future.2/26/1343
  • 44. President Niinistö on the social exclusion ofyoung people: We all have a responsibility in thisPresident Niinistö stressed that the contribution ofeach and every adult is needed to prevent the socialexclusion of young2/26/13A good place to live, learn, work and enterprise in.44
  • 45. Educational guarantee – a study placefor everyone finishing basic educationThe educational guarantee secures every comprehensive schoolgraduate a place in a general upper secondary school orvocational school, an apprenticeship, a workshop or vocationalrehabilitation place, or a place in some other form of study.The guarantee sets out aims to provide all young people withrealistic opportunities to pursue and complete a post-basicqualification and find employment. Simultaneously, attention ispaid to not leaving young people without a study place or workfor too long, as this increases their risk of social exclusion.2/26/1345
  • 46. Even just one everyday thingWellbeing of young people cannot be pursued by official actionand committee reports alone. The entire community around ayoung person growing up has a huge impact: home, family,neighbours, friends, daycare, school and hobbies.All these are communities that help shape what a young personbecomes. We all have a responsibility in thisWhat we need are solutions that are simple enough and easyenough to put into practice.2/26/1346
  • 47. The Finnish EducationEvaluation Council•  Serves as an expert body for educational evaluation inconnection with the Ministry of Education and Culture•  The operations of the Council are prepared and organized bythe Secretariat of the FEEC•  FEEC is a separate institute within the University of Jyväskylä2/26/1347
  • 48. Operation of the EducationEvaluation council•  The Council is appointed as an independent body by the Ministryof Education and Culture and has 14 members maximum.•  The Council, together with the Ministry of Education and Culture,is responsible for educational evaluation and its development inthe areas of basic education, upper secondary school education,vocational education and vocational adult education as well asindependent civic education.•  Evaluation supports decision making by the Ministry of Educationand Culture, education providers and educational institutes2/26/1348
  • 49. Values of evaluation•  Evaluation supports the promotion of educational equality.•  Fairness means establishing an ethically sound basis forevaluation and refraining from comparisons that coulddamage the target.•  Truthfulness refers to ethically high-level responsibility,acritical approach, and optimal reliability in evaluation•  Constructive evaluation.2/26/1349
  • 50. Priciples of evaluation•  Evaluation is independent.•  Evaluation involves active participation.•  Evaluation aims at quality.•  Evaluation is based on openness.•  Evaluation promotes development.•  Evaluation is efficient and economical.2/26/1350
  • 51. The aims of evaluation•  Evaluation seeks to acquire and analyze datain order to provide a basis for national educationpolicy and local decision-making as well as foreducational development.•  In addition, it aims to support students’learning, the work of educational personnel, andthe development of educational institutes.2/26/1351
  • 52. Evaluation methods•  The Council develops evaluation methods for theneeds of various users.•  National evaluations will make use ofself-evaluations both by education providers andby educational institutes and also disseminatesuccessful practices.2/26/1352
  • 53. Utilisation of evaluationinformation•  Evaluation information plays a central role in theformation of education policy and in educationaldevelopment.•  The emphasis of the evaluation programme is on theappropriateness, timeliness, and versatility ofevaluation.•  In evaluation activities a premium is placed oncustomer-oriented reporting, developmentrecommendations and consultative support at thecustomer’s request.2/26/1353
  • 54. Communication andinformation•  The transparency and effectiveness of educationalevaluation will be promoted by the release of evaluationresults in the Council’s publication series.•  Education providers and educational institutesconcerned will always be notified of the evaluation results,and schools will not be ranked.•  Evaluation publications are available also on the web.Evaluation reports will include an abstract in English.•  The Council produce publications concerning evaluationmethodology. 2/26/1354
  • 55. Learner evaluation•  Self-evaluation•  Grades, and semester evaluation•  National tests on mathematics and finnishlanguage to define support needs•  Social and healthcareNo tests geared towards ranking2/26/1355
  • 56. Teacher evaluation•  Development discussions•  Peer feedback•  Self-evaluation•  Feedback from the parents•  Direct feedback from the learners2/26/1356
  • 57. Examples of Evaluations•  Basic educational security, special needs education,remedial teaching and student welfare services in basiceducation.•  The need for special education in upper secondary schools.•  From goals to interaction. Evaluation of pedagogy in Finnishbasic education.•  Evaluation of pedagogy in Finnish upper secondaryeducation•  The functionality of the Finnish pre-primary and basiceducation curriculum system2/26/1357
  • 58. Educational outcomes and health ofchildren – process of segregation in theHelsinki Metropolitan Area - MetrOP•  Focus: increasing differentiation in children’s educational outcomesand health as components of a process of social and spatialsegregation in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA)•  Research team:–  Tampere University (School of Public Health and MedicalSchool)–  National Institute for Health and Welfare–  University of Helsinki (Geography Department and Centre forEducational Assessment)•  HMA: the commuting zone of Helsinki (1.2 million inhabitants, 14municipalities)•  the city of Espoo one of the municipalities2/26/13Tekijätiedot ja/tai esityksen nimi58
  • 59. Educational outcomes and health ofchildren – process of segregation in theHelsinki Metropolitan Area - MetrOP•  in 2012 all 7th graders (13 years old) were included in the survey: inEspoo 29 schools participated•  some results of the study:–  girls succeeded somewhat better than boys in all areas of thestudy–  clear connection between the parents’ educational backgroundand the educational outcomes of the children–  negative attitudes on learning have a slightly stronger connectionon educational outcomes than positive–  clear differences between schools were detected when theeducational outcomes and the pupils’ school marks at the 6thgrade were compared–  in terms of educational outcomes, Espoo was found to be abovethe average and in terms of health, on the normal level•  the final report will be published in 2013 2/26/13Tekijätiedot ja/tai esityksen nimi59
  • 60. Educational outcomes and health ofchildren – process of segregation in theHelsinki Metropolitan Area - MetrOP•  in 2012 all 7th graders (13 years old) were included in the survey: inEspoo 29 schools participated•  some results of the study:–  girls succeeded somewhat better than boys in all areas of the study–  clear connection between the parents’ educational background andthe educational outcomes of the children–  negative attitudes on learning have a slightly stronger connection oneducational outcomes than positive–  clear differences between schools were detected when theeducational outcomes and the pupils’ school marks at the 6th gradewere compared–  in terms of educational outcomes, Espoo was found to be above theaverage and in terms of health, on the normal level•  the final report will be published in 20132/26/13Tekijätiedot ja/tai esityksen nimi60
  • 61. Linkage between external and localevaluation and external support to educationproviders•  Education providers evaluate their own provisionof education and decide on their own evaluation models,methods and indicators.National evaluations make use of the evaluations carried out byeducational providers and educational institutes.•  To support local evaluation, efforts will be made to develop arelevant expertise reserve, networked evaluation culture,evaluationmodels, methods, criteria, measures, and indicatorsas well as information networks.2/26/1361
  • 62. Networks and other co-operation in evaluation•  The evaluation system will be developed and theevaluations carried out through a network that is built onpartnership with experts from science and research,educational administration, teaching, and various interest groups.•  Major partners in international co-operation includeevaluation organisations from different countries along with theNordic Council of Ministers, the CEDEFOP, the OECD, andthe EU. The Education Evaluation Council contributes activelyto the European evaluation policy and culture.2/26/1362
  • 63. •  Every school is consequently expected toprovide an adequate learning environment forevery pupil and it is therefore a big challenge foran individual school to build a full functioningsupport system for a very heterogeneous groupof pupils. It will require a great deal ofdevelopment work if inclusion is to beincorporated into Finnish schools.2/26/1364
  • 64. 2/26/1365AutonomyStateMunicipalityMunicipalitySchool /PrincipalPrincipalTeacherLearner
  • 65. Autonomy•  Administration•  Finances•  Grouping•  Recruiting•  Number of schools•  The evaluation system•  Profiled education•  Education in other languages•  In-house training•  Languages offered2/26/1366
  • 66. Evaluation in Espoo•  The self-evaluation of school activities in our school is systematic.•  The evaluation of school activities complies with ethical principles(such as objectivity, confidentiality, ways that the evaluation and itsoutcomes are used).•  The outcomes of the self-evaluation of our school are taken intoaccount in the plans for academic years.•  The information generated by evaluations leads to practicalimprovements in our school.•  .2/26/1367
  • 67. Evaluation in Espoo•  Guardians are informed of the key evaluation data concerningour school.•  The quality of pupil assessments in our school is consistent.•  Pupils are allowed to demonstrate their true potential throughdiverse assessment methods.•  ADDITIONAL STATEMENTS•  The implementation of the plan for the academic year isevaluated regularly.•  The implementation of the curriculum is evaluated regularly.2/26/1368
  • 68. 2/26/1369
  • 69. 2/26/13Tapio Erma70
  • 70. SELF-EVALUATION OF SCHOOLSIN THE CITY OF ESPOO•  Self-evaluation helps schools to pinpoint strengths and challengesand develope key processes. School´s an evaluation plan guidesthe evaluation process over a three-year period.•  Self-evaluation tools:–  Primary and secondary schools: Self-evaluation Questionnaire forBasic Education in Espoo (based on National Quality Criterias for BasicEducation) and Manual–  Upper secondary schools: EfeCaf (EFQM)•  Subjects of evaluation: Productivity in education, Learningenvironment, Student services, Management and leadership, Personnelwelfare, Studet welware2/26/13Tekijätiedot ja/tai esityksen nimi71STAGE II:Conductingself-evaluationQualityquestionnaireSTAGE III:Preparing andimplementingdevelopmentplansSTAGE I:CollectingevaluationdataCOLLECTING EVALUATION DATACLIENT RESPONSES• e.g. pupils’questionnaire,guardians’ feedbackquestionnaireHUMAN RESOURCERESPONSES• e.g. personnelquestionnaire,Kunta10,developmentdiscussionsACTIVE COMMUNITYMEMBERSHIP• e.g. internationalprojects, ecologicalapproachKEY PERFORMANCERESULTS• e.g. nationalexaminations andlearning performancedata, school healthquestionnaireADDITIONALINFORMATION• e.g. school’sorganisationalchart, keyprocesses•  Self-evaluation is based on thecollected key evaluation data.•  Schools analyse the resultsby themselves and also writethe evaluation report anddevelopment plans.•  Finnish Education Unit inEspoo uses the collectedevaluation data as a part of it´sdevelopment and planning.
  • 71. •  Self- evaluation and audition have becomecommon as an apparatus of evaluation inFinnish schools but they must be usedsystematically and regularly to provide usefulinformation on the quality and content of thebasic processes and procedures in school.2/26/1372

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