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How You're LinkedIn to Identity Theft
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How You're LinkedIn to Identity Theft

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How You're LinkedIn to Identity Theft How You're LinkedIn to Identity Theft Presentation Transcript

  • How You’re LinkedIn toIdentity Theft
  • The RiskUsers of social networking sites likely have heard aboutthe risks of oversharing personal information, particularlyon Facebook.But according to a new report, LinkedIn users are themost vulnerable.The 2012 Identity Fraud Report from Javelin Strategy &Research found that LinkedIn users are more likely to betargeted for identity theft than people who use: © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 2
  • LinkedIn vs. FacebookUsers of theprofessionalnetworking siteexperienced a 10percent incidence LinkedIn and Google+ Usersrate of fraud, Have a Higher Incidence ofcompared with 7 Fraudpercent for Google+users and 5.7percent forFacebook users,according to theJavelin report. © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 3
  • 3 Reasons WhyUsers of LinkedIn are more at risk because:• LinkedIn is a professional networking site, not a social networking site, that attracts users with higher incomes. – Many LinkedIn users have a household income above $100,000.• Profiles are meant to be viewed by people the users don’t know. – Profiles feature résumés loaded personal information. • Fraudsters can leverage this data to create convincing emails that get users to divulge bank or credit account numbers and other personal information.• Users may be more lax with their privacy settings. © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 4
  • What to Look ForSigns you’ve been targeted for fraud:• Invitations to connect that appear legitimate• Fraudulent email notifications that you have “messages” in your LinkedIn Inbox• Fraudulent email notifications that your account has been closed• Inbox messages that appear legitimate - Many of the above alerts contain links to suspicious domains. They’re intended to gather more information from users in order to steal their identities. © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 5
  • Example 1Here’s what afake invitationto connectlooks like: © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 6
  • Example 2Here’s what aphishing messagelooks like: © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 7
  • 5 Tips to Protect Yourself• Delete suspicious emails• Don’t click on links or download attachments in suspicious emails• Go directly to your LinkedIn account for invitations and messages• Protect your computer with up-to-date antivirus software• Monitor your account’s privacy settings © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 8
  • Protect YourselfIf you suspect your identity hasbeen stolen… – Call your insurer or bank, which might provide LifeStages™ Identity Management Services from Identity Theft 911. – Or contact us directly. One of our fraud specialists will guide you and provide practical support until your good name and credit are restored. © 2003-2011 Identity Theft 911, LLC. All RightsMarch 16, 2012 Reserved - Confidential 9