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Kristin Ingersoll - Professional Portfolio (limited edition)

Kristin Ingersoll - Professional Portfolio (limited edition)

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  • 1.  
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  • 3. Statement of Goals In a global market that is expanding at a rapid rate, training remains central in the professional development of the workforce. Human-computer interaction and eLearning have become the mainstay of human performance evaluation and training. The technical advancements of eLearning and web design are important and exciting. I keep up-to-date and consider my specialty eLearning. My professional goal is to work as a part of a team who concentrates on the design, development and implementation of user-centered training. This portfolio highlights my skills and competencies as an analyst, designer and consultant in the field of instructional design.
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  • 5. 6 HORIZON GOLD AWARD: 2008 Additional Duty Safety Official Course (Carney, Inc.) OMNI GOLD AWARD: 2009 Composite Risk Management for Army Ordinance Branch (Carney, Inc.) OMNI SILVER AWARD: 2009 Original Classification and Safeguarding Classified Information in the National Industrial Security Program (DoD) (Carney, Inc.) Awards
  • 6. References are available upon request. You may peruse my LinkedIn references in the meantime. 10 Professional References
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  • 8. Needs Analysis for Eli Lilly & Co. CONTEXT This Needs Analysis project took place at Eli Lilly and company in Indianapolis, Indiana in October 2002. The project was completed as part of the first phase of a proactive initiative to improve the professional improvement and development department . CONDITIONS The timeframe to complete this needs analysis was limited to one month. I was able to continue speaking to the operators, the subjects of the assessment, after the report was complete, and was able to act as a trusted intermediary to management during my almost five years at Eli Lilly as a result of this project. I worked on this project from its inception to my presentation of the results at the end of October, 2002. I conducted all of the interviews and surveys and compiled the results. SCOPE This project was completed on schedule, in October, 2002 in a presentation to the Diabetes Care Manufacturing Senior Management and Parenteral Performance Improvement departments at Eli Lilly. The action on recommendations, development and implementation of training solutions began immediately and was still taking place in 2007. ROLE I worked alone on this project as the Parenteral Performance Improvement Training Associate. All materials presented were original and created by me. A genericized version of this assessment is available on my website www.westsbrooktraining.com.
  • 9. Needs and Recommendations were provided to the Parenteral Diabetes Care Manufacturing facility based on numerous interviews and surveys conducted in the course of this evaluation. Specific questions were asked regarding the amount of actual hands-on practice trainees were given before going live on the floor unsupervised. The answers were not a surprise, but underlined the importance of a new, serious Train-the-Trainer protocol. 6. 7. Morale is very low. People feel unappreciated and undervalued. Trainers and operators alike are concerned that too many new hires are coming in all at once. They do not feel capable of training them all consistently and completely. Procedures are an issue. The opinion is that there are too many, they are confusing and revisions occur too frequently. New operators are being left unattended before they are certified, or even sometimes before they sign off on procedures. Trainers do not feel that their additional workload is being recognized. Many employees do not understand the basics of diabetes and the use of insulin. Needs More hands-on (learning lab) and one-on-one training (mentorship) A training course for both On-the-Job Trainers as well as operators given the additional responsibility of training new hires A recognition program to acknowledge dedication and service Training “spot checks” should be made More trainers on each shift “ Diabetes 101” and “Insulin 101” required for all levels, both existing and new employees. Dissemination of information regarding the department and the company 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Recommendations Did your On-the-job-Trainer end up doing the task at hand rather than having you try it?
  • 10. Needs Analysis project for Avaya CONTEXT This analysis and evaluation project took place at Avaya in Cincinnati, Ohio from February to April, 2001. The project was completed as part of an internship through Avaya and was conducted mainly on the campus of Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. CONDITIONS My clients at Avaya requested the materials for this project be completed by April 2001 for a formal presentation. This was one of many projects completed during the course of this internship. I worked on this project from its inception and handed it over to my project manager in April, 2001. I conducted all of the interviews and surveys and compiled the results. I generated the entire PowerPoint presentation including original graphics and charts. SCOPE This project was completed in April, 2002 in a presentation by my clients at Avaya to their yearly professional conference. The materials I created were submitted to the Avaya project manager and were presented to the department as the final version of this project. ROLE I worked alone on this project, although I was in close contact with the project manager at Avaya. All materials presented were original and created by me.
  • 11. Demographics/Why individuals chose to participate in Avaya Certification Other certifications held and benefits used What types of benefits candidates would like to see associated with Avaya Certification and how it would impact their job performance. A survey of Avaya Certification candidates was conducted to help determine the preferred benefits that Avaya should implement for Avaya Certified professionals. Information captured included:
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  • 13. Big Brothers Big Sisters CONTEXT Big Brothers Big Sisters of Monroe County, located in Bloomington, Indiana, engaged my services as a part of a design team. The project took place from September to December, 2001. The website was completed as a class project and encompassed the areas of analysis, design, development and implementation. CONDITIONS Because of the connection with a class project, the timeframe to complete the design of this site was limited to a semester. We continued to work in conjunction with Big Brothers Big Sisters to make any necessary adjustments after the completion of the original website. I worked as a part of a team on this project and handed it over the Big Brothers Big Sisters Webmaster for implementation. Our team conducted all of the analyses and produced the entire website with original text and graphics. SCOPE This project was completed in December, 2001 with a final presentation to the client. The materials, including background research and digital images, were given to the client for integration into their current website. ROLE I served as a project manager on this project. I was responsible for the generation of text as well as the general flow of the website. My team member created the HTML and I served as the editor for the site.
  • 14. The orientation program provided information about the various volunteer opportunities and included an online application. Our team designed an online orientation program that gave background information about mentoring and asked pertinent questions that led to program recommendations. What is a mentor? Why mentor? Keys to mentoring Are you ready? 1 2 6 3 5 4 Questions/Recommendations Applications
  • 15. Train-the-Trainer Workshop – Eli Lilly & Co. CONTEXT This Train-the-Trainer course was designed as a result of a gap found during a needs analysis. The trainers not only needed a training program, but requested one. BACKGROUND Operators had been training new operators based on Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) without paying too much attention to the accompanying training. The senior operators (who’ve worked there for years) had been training… without training. CONDITIONS I worked on a team with Alan Helms, also a Training Associate. We designed a two-day workshop that incorporated blended learning and taught the OJTs a bit of adult learning theory as well as the importance of consistency and the “whys” behind the “hows”. SCOPE This project was completed during the summer of 2005, piloted during the fall and finally implemented to the entire Parenteral OJT audience during the winter of 2005 and spring of 2006 with yearly brush-up courses scheduled. ROLE Allen and I played equal roles in the creation of this workshop. I did more of the creative aspects, while Allen focused on the logistics and statistics.
  • 16. The workshop was two days and this “Structured OJT Model” was used as a reference guide throughout the two days. This was also laminated and handed out as a job aid, a take-away, on the second day, for easy reference. We incorporated many Learning Activities into this workshop. Our activities always served as good reminders for me of what I should be including in my instructional design and my everyday behavior - like active listening! Another important activity had the course instructors (US) teaching small groups (3-4 participants) how to make origami airplanes, whales or cranes. The next person would teach another person at the table, using everything they’d learned at the workshop, be critiqued by their counterparts and an instructor. Then as a final qualification for the course, they’d do the same thing, with no coaching with the third origami project, graded by a course instructor as pass/fail for the workshop
  • 17. Indianapolis Parenteral Performance Improvement Department Manual CONTEXT The IPPI Manual was an idea generated during a meeting of a few Instructional Designers. It was presented to leadership and was approved. With a three department merge, there were processes being used that varied from slightly to completely different. After manual was an effort t o equalize and streamline those processes. CONDITIONS I worked in a team of three on his project. We had a larger team f SMEs, and since this was a project for our own department, and one that people were enthusiastic about, we had quick access to them. Our team consisted of an Technical Writer from the procedures department, an Instructional Designer (me) and a Team Leader. We worked on a three month deadline. The final manual I SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) form was approved at the end of December 2005. The training version was approved in July,2006. SCOPE The writing of the manual was divided equally into three portions by the team. We were all given a crash course in technical writing by M. Baechle, our technical writer, so that we could write in the SOP format. I took everyone’s pieces and put the manual together. I edited and formatted the material so it had “one voice.” ROLE I wrote certain sections and edited the whole manual. I also created all of the forms in Visio and all of the “fill-in” forms and attachments.
  • 18. As three Performance Improvement departments merged, it took more than two years two comb through the processes and streamline them into one , coherent process for the Parenteral Manufacturing PI Department. The manual covered all of the aspects of the journey of the SOP (Standard Operating Procedure) and course, from inception to approval. This manual included each group within the IPPI department, We began the process of designing the manual by gathering representatives from each group from IPPI and agreeing on this flowchart. Then, utilizing SMEs in-group, we wrote this manual, first in the SOP style, then in a more person-friendly, training format.
  • 19. The Department of Homeland Security – Cost Analysis CONTEXT This development project took place at Carney, Inc through our client, The Department of Homeland Security. We had a four-month timeline. I was a Performance Solutions Designer. My duties included assimilating a large amount of complicated financial information, storyboarding three modules, communicating with graphic designers, software engineers and quality control, as well subject matter experts and the client. CONDITIONS Preparation for this project included sorting through a large amount of information supplied by the client, determining how to chunk the information into learnable sections and communicating extensively with subject matter experts. SCOPE I worked with my Lead PSD, Noanie Sullivan, to sort through the complicated subject matter and to set the tone for the course. As the Lead, Ms. Sullivan set the timeline and I followed it closely to ensure we didn’t go over budget and turned deliverables in on time. ROLE I storyboarded and edited one of the two modules, which included three lessons. My Lead PSD completed the other module. We worked as a team on the complicated project.
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  • 21. Every Carney course is set up to include an introduction screen. The DHS standard introduction screen looks like this. This course included a certificate of completion and points toward the completion of a larger curriculum. Rollovers, such as the “CAS” on the left, and pop-ups, such as the examples below, are used to provide more information, questions, and examples . This keeps the learner interactive with the material instead of just clicking through the course.
  • 22. FW: DHS Comments: Final Courseware for Entire Cost Analysis Course ‏ From: Noanie Sullivan (noanie.sullivan@teamcarney.com) Sent:Fri 8/21/09 8:06 AM To: ID4hire@hotmail.com Kristin,   Please see the COTR’s comments below and CONGRATULATIONS on a job well-executed. I can’t thank you enough for your diligence and follow-through on this courseware. The client manager and COO were delighted to announce this “Remarkable Client Experience (RCE)” at the Carney all-hands meeting and thanked the team for the great effort. They also said that initially the client didn’t believe this week-long classroom training could be effectively taught online and have been gratified at the response in testing it with contracting officers.   It was a pleasure working with you on the project. I appreciate the free exchange in our working relationship to come up with the best possible solutions for complex concepts. I delighted in your ability to visually represent the content and provide meaningful interactivity in order to keep the learner engaged. Thanks again for a terrific job!   Sincerely, Noanie Sullivan Senior Performance Solutions Designer   Carney, Inc. http:// www.teamcarney.com /   Performance Acceleration™ . -----Original Message----- From: Curtis, Craig <Craig.Curtis@dhs.gov> Sent: Thursday, July 30, 2009 6:00 PM To: Antoinette Squires-Smith (Contractor) <Antoinette.Squires-Smith@teamcarney.com>; Skip Hall <shall@ManagementConcepts.com>; Asad Abdelaziz <Asad.Abdelaziz@teamcarney.com> Cc: Moler, Bruce <Bruce.Moler@dhs.gov>; Parker, Molly <Molly.Parker@dhs.gov> Subject: DHS Comments:   Order #HSHQDC-07-Q-00258 TO 6--Final Courseware for Entire Cost Analysis Course   Antoinette, Skip,   Beautifully done.  This reflects extremely well on the MCI/Carney Team.   Our students have no excuse but to learn!!!  With content and your finessing, this really is a beautiful course with content rich material. It sets DHS workforce apart from other Federal Agencies, by having this superb training available to them.   Thank you very much.  It has been a pleasure working with you all on these courses.   Craig
  • 23. The Department of Homeland Security – Office of the Chief Procurement Officer Orientation CONTEXT This development project took place at Carney, Inc through our client, The Department of Homeland Security. We had a three-month timeline. I was a Performance Solutions Designer. My duties included gathering information from the client and the client’s website, storyboarding one course, communicating with graphic designers, software engineers and quality control, as well subject matter experts and the client. CONDITIONS Preparation for this project included sorting through a large amount of information supplied by the client and their website, determining how to chunk the information into learnable sections and communicating with subject matter experts. SCOPE I worked with my Lead PSD, Jennifer Hennard, to sort through the subject matter and to set the tone for the course. As the Lead, Ms. Hennard set the timeline and I followed it closely to ensure we didn’t go over budget and turned deliverables in on time. ROLE I was given autonomy on this course, so was given some “Lead” roles. I storyboarded and edited the entire course.
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  • 27. The National Science Foundation – Implicit Bias CONTEXT This development project took place at The National Science Foundation in Arlington, VA. It was a fairly short project that took about two months to complete. I served as the sole Sr. Instructional Designer on the project, but, of course, had my team quality check my work. I also produced the project since it was completed in Adobe Presenter and did not need an actual graphic artist to render anything for it. CONDITIONS I was working concurrently on another large project, but the subject matter experts on “Implicit Bias” made this project roll very smoothly. They were very flexible, while keeping to the set schedule. SCOPE We set a two month schedule, and I finished the project ahead of time. I used one of the subject matter experts as the narrator. It was a short course, 15 minutes. SME COMMENTS: Kristin, This certainly couldn’t have happened without your dedicated attention to the project.  Thanks again for all of your help. -Kelli Kellina M. Craig-Henderson, Ph.D. Program Director, Social Psychology , Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences, Human Subjects Research Protections Officer , National Science Foundation Kristin, This is steps far and above what we’ve seen before. Thank you for all of your hard work! Fae Fae Korsmo, Sr. Advisor, Office of the Director, National Science Foundation
  • 28. Adobe Presenter allows learners to navigate screens. I was able to lock the screens the SME and I decided we did not want them to be able to skip. Adobe Presenter provides a “notes” section which maintains Section 508 capabilities. Presenter allows for limited interactivity, but I did include a link to the Harvard-based Implicit Association Test, which allowed learners to see how easily we all slip into our own biases.
  • 29. The Rosie O’Donnell Show CONTEXT This development project took place at The Rosie O’Donnell Show in New York City. It was an ongoing project that spanned two years of the television program. I was an Associate Producer at the time, and my duties included the development of “Rosie’s Craft Corner.” CONDITIONS While preparation time for each of these segments ranged from weeks to days, the actual segment was a seven-minute demonstration on live television. I gathered ideas from my own experience I’m very crafty!) as well as from audience members who sent craft concepts into the show. SCOPE I worked with my producer C. Deyo to get this segment on the air. There was a lot of pre-production involved in producing the examples, in various stages of completion. Since Rosie was a talk show and didn’t have a set construction crew, we had to put most of this together ourselves. At times, we snuck into the Saturday Nigh Live studio down the hall and got a little help. But we had fun and were proud of what we did. “Rosie’s Craft Corner” lived on after I left the show, which made me feel good ROLE Rosie’s Craft Corner was my idea. I helped develop the idea to fruition. I helped to produce the segments, generating ideas and developing the step-by-step instructions. I also wrote the directions out and posted them to Rosie’s website.
  • 30. One of the things I did on a weekly basis was to find an art project, teach Rosie how to do it. Then I’d tell her how to teach a celebrity how to do it on live TV. Train-the-Trainer! I just didn’t realize that’s what it was called! DECOPAGE Supplies: Paper art (see step 1) Glue (can be either Mod Podge, special decoupage glue or plain old Elmer’s) Your base – thing of anything – go wild! (Some suggestions: frames, boxes, suitcases, posters) Scissors Paint brush (any kind, but we suggest foam) Instructions: Step 1: Choose your art! You can use family photos (but we would suggest using color copies so they aren’t ruined), magazine pictures, newspaper clippings, wrapping paper – anything! Step 2: Using your glue, prepare the base. If you’re using something large like a suitcase, do little bits at a time. Spread the glue evenly over the base. Step 3: Lay your cut-out paper art over the glue carefully. Use your fingers to smooth any wrinkles or air bubbles. Step 4: Using you brush, spread an even coat of glue over the artwork. The more layers of glue you use, the thicker the glaze will be. But remember, the more glue there is, the harder it will be to see the art. We suggest two or three thin coats. Step 5: Let it dry completely and you’re ready to put your artwork in a place of honor!
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  • 32. FiSH! Presentation – Team Building CONTEXT Our merged department was, two years later, still very much three departments, referring to themselves and each other by their respective “old” names. Team Building was needed. I asked my Team Leader and with her consent presented the idea to the leadership team for my department, to present the FiSH! Principles – a concept derived from the Seattle Fish Market about customer service a teamwork. CONDITIONS I was not given a timeline for this project, but I did tell leadership that I wanted to present this to my training team in the second quarter of 2006. I worked on this project alone. SCOPE The artwork I created was original. The materials were derived from the book, “FiSH!” [ Lundin, Stephen C, Christensen, John and Paul, Harry. Hyperion, New York, 2000] And, of course, my own mind, which was enriched greatly by reading this book and the other FiSH! Books! ROLE I created this project. I obtained the 17-minute video from the Lilly Library. I designed the course, the handouts, the take-always, the activities and discussions. I also designed room decorations and snacks (ok I design the colored fish crackers, but I thought of them!).
  • 33. The FiSH! Principles are: The book and my presentation center around customer service and teamwork – how YOU as an individual can make a difference. This was velcroed into the handout so that learners could remove it and attach it to their cubicles/desks for easy reference if the wished. 1. Play 2. Be There 3. Make Their Day 4. Choose Your Attitude. I did not use any PowerPoint slides. I used handouts and played a 17-minute video. I spoke and we did activities. The handouts were the learners’ to take with them. I touched on a lot of the points, but not all of them, on each page, an I included references for more material like FiSH!
  • 34. Evaluation of Mega Math Video CONTEXT This evaluation project took place at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana in May, 2001. The evaluation was completed as a class project. CONDITIONS Because of the connection with a class project, the timeframe to complete this needs analysis was limited to a few weeks. I worked as a member of an eight-person team and we used classmates as our target audience. SCOPE We evaluated the effectiveness of a video presentation of math skills called “Mega Math” which taught a new way of adding numbers, from right to left. The video was provided by a teammate, but all of the materials used in the course of the evaluation were produced by our team. ROLE I was responsible for the final paper on this project as well as playing a part of the evaluation team during the actual demonstration. I served as the major writer and editor of the material generated by our research.
  • 35. We set out to discover if there were changes in both attitudes concerning math and abilities. Attititudes changed very little, The mega Math video claimed to help people add faster. We timed the subjects and discovered the opposite. The new method of addition actually took our subjects longer than their usual method of addition. The one subject whose time remained the same already added from left to right.
  • 36. Evaluation project for Eli Lilly & Co. CONTEXT This Evaluation project took place at Eli Lilly and company in Indianapolis, Indiana from October to December, 2001 in conjunction with a needs analysis. The eMarketing group requested a needs assessment of the information and misinformation believed by the general marketing population at Eli Lilly concerning eMarketing and eTactics. CONDITIONS The timeframe to complete this needs analysis was limited to three months. However, once the project was completed to the satisfaction of the course, I continued to work in conjunction with the eMarketing group to satisfy their needs. I worked on this project from its inception and handed it over to my project manager in February, 2002. I conducted all of the interviews and surveys and compiled the results. SCOPE This project was completed on schedule, in February, 2002 in a presentation to the eMarketing department at Eli Lilly and other interested parties. It was then handed over to the Global Sales and Marketing Training department for further development and implementation. ROLE I worked alone on this project as the consultant, although in very close connection with the project manager at Eli Lilly. All materials presented were original and created by me.
  • 37. Tools employed to determine the needs and recommendations in this analysis included a SWOTI analysis, which compared the Opportunities, Threats, Strengths and Weaknesses and their interactions.