Gender analysis in value chains: What data reveals for program design

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Gender analysis in value chains: What data reveals for program design

  1. 1. Gender analysis in value chains:What data reveals for program design Cristina Manfre, Senior associate Cultural Practice, LLC May 23, 2011 Nairobi, Kenya
  2. 2. ‘Not everything that counts can be counted and not everything that can be counted counts.’ Albert Einstein
  3. 3. Types of value chain dataQuantitative Qualitative – Sex-segmentation, Practices and participation informality, labor allocation Access to control and productive – Distribution of value added resources – Prices, volumes, costs, inputs, Beliefs and perceptions wages, and production data Laws and policies – Forward and backward Power linkages
  4. 4. Complementary data sourcesGroup Sex Number of Number of Sales (Ksh) Income per Avg return members vines capita (Ksh) per vine (Ksh)Passion Male 1207 178,200 7 million 5800 39.28Fruit Female 511 60,261 4 million 7828 66.38• Why is women’s participation lower than men’s in the group?• What type of access do women have to land on which they are going passionfruit?• What perceptions exist around women’s income from passion fruit?•What accounts for the production and marketing differences?
  5. 5. Integrating Gender into Agricultural Value Chains (INGIA-VC) Process
  6. 6. Gender Dimensions Framework Access to, control over, and ownership of productive assets Laws and policies Power Beliefs and perceptions Practices and Participation
  7. 7. Gender-based constraints… are barriers or limits that inhibit either men’s or women’s access to resources or opportunities based on characteristics associated with their gender roles.The term encompasses both the measurable inequalities as well as the processes that contribute to a specific condition of gender inequality.
  8. 8. Measurable gender inequality or disparity+ Factor causing that conditionGender-based constraint statement
  9. 9. Example: Kenya Dairy Value ChainFewer women than men are members of the dairy producers association (although women are caretakers of dairy cows) + Dairy associations require titled ownership to land Women are constrained from full membership in the dairy association because they are not registered landowners. (And thus do not receive payment for the milk.)
  10. 10. What to do?
  11. 11. Strategies to Support Gender Equity• Targeting: Address the Needs of Women• Empowerment: Foster Equitable Participation and Women’s Leadership• Economic Efficiency: Support Women’s Economic Advancement

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