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Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
Torso Core Training Site
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Torso Core Training Site

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Transcript

  • 1. A Practical Approach to Torso Training Brijesh Patel, CSCS, USAW
  • 2. “ Balance is key, balance is everything” – Mr. Miyagi (Karate Kid)
  • 3. What exactly is the Torso?
    • Synonymous with core, trunk, abdominals, etc.
    • All encompassing term
    • “ The Middle Body”
    • Rectus Abdominus, TVA, Internal & External Obliques, Erectors, Quadratus Lumborum, Psoas; **Glutes/Hamstrings
  • 4. The torso is where it’s at!
    • Key to athletic power development
    • Injury reduction
    • Kinetic Chain dysfunctions
    • The Genesis of movement- Body can not initiate movement without first stabilizing spine via the core muscles (Hodges & Richardson)
    • “ Train from the inside out”: Core/Torso then extremities (Gambetta)
  • 5. Traditional Abdominal Training
    • Usually done after workout
    • Not a lot of variety
    • Non-functional positions
    • Limited ROM
    • Lack of stabilization work
    • About the “burn”
    • Leads to imbalances!!
  • 6. New Thoughts
    • Performed First
    • Variety of Movements
    • Challenging exercises- stability
    • Progressed Exercises
    • Functional Positions
    • Not about the “burn”
    • Must be coached!!
  • 7. News Abs
    • Local Muscles/Inner Unit: TVA, multifidus, internal oblique
    • Segmental stabilization
    • Global Muscles/Outer Unit: Rectus, erectors, external oblique
    • Gross stabilization and movement
  • 8. Muscles and their Functions
    • Not the most exciting part but is very important to understand
    • Important to understand which muscles are active during which movements
    • Helps to notice compensation patterns and distortions within the kinetic chain
  • 9. Inner Unit: Transverse Abdominis
    • Increases intra-abdominal pressure by applying lateral traction to the middle layer of the lumbodorsal fascia
    • This creates an extension force in the flexed position (lifting object from floor)
    • Major stabilizer of the low back
    • The TVA, multifidus and pelvic floor muscles are on the same neurological loop; If the TVA is not working properly, these muscles will also not function correctly
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 10. Inner Unit: Internal Oblique
    • Bends the trunk forward through bilateral stimulation
    • Bends the trunk sideways and rotates it toward the ipsilateral side through unilateral stimulation
    • Ipsilateral rotator when the pelvis is anchored
    • Contralateral rotator when the trunk is anchored
    • Cooperates with contralateral external oblique
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 11. Inner Unit: Multifidus
    • Extension
    • Rotational Stabilizer
    • Multi-segmental stabilization
    • Primary stabilizer of the SI Joint
    • When back injury occurs begins to atrophy within 24 hours (Richardson & Jull)
    • Moth-eaten look
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 12. Outer Unit: External Oblique
    • Bends the trunk forward through bilateral stimulation
    • Tilts pelvis posteriorly
    • Ipsilateral lateral flexion and contralateral trunk rotation through unilateral stimulation
    • Increases intra-abdominal pressure
    • Largest abdominal muscle
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 13. Outer Unit: Rectus Abdominis
    • Flexes the trunk if the pelvis is fixed
    • Lifts and posteriorly rotates the pelvis if the trunk is fixed
    • Stabilizer on the contralateral side under dynamic conditions or with a heavy load
    • Increases intra-abdominal pressure
    • Key Function: decelerates trunk extension (i.e. throwing)
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 14. Outer Unit: Psoas
    • Flexes the trunk when the feet are anchored
    • Flexes the hip when the trunk is anchored
    • Hypertrophy or hypertonicity of the psoas causes anterior pelvic tilt by approximation of the lesser trochanter and lumbar spine
    • Major culprit in lower back pain
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 15. Outer Unit: Quadratus Lumborum
    • Lateral Flexion with the pelvis fixed
    • Provides stability to L5-S1; frontal plane stability
    • When the psoas becomes shortened, the QL also shortens
    • Chek, Clark Manuals
  • 16. Problems with Traditional Abs
    • One movement oriented; flexion
    • Imbalance between movements
    • Lack of stability
    • Psoas and hip flexor dominant
    • Lots of hip and trunk flexion can cause the iliopsoas to become shortened -> anterior pelvic tilt-> reciprocal inhibition to glute max-> increased shear force at lumbar spine-> inner unit is inhibited-> low back pain
  • 17. Importance of Stability
    • Flexion force + Extension force = Stabilization
    • The co-contraction of the deep abdominal musculature helps to stabilize spine prior to limb movement
    • TVA, Internal Oblique and Multifidus work together to provide segmental stability to the vertebrae
    • Weak Link Theory- You are only as strong as your weakest link
    • Force is produced from the ground up and needs to be transferred through a rigid body to the upper extremities
  • 18. Training the torso
    • Teach athletes/clients how to Draw-In (Boyle, Chek, Clark)
    • Draw-In Analogies: belly button to spine, tightest pants, narrow space
    • Re-educate deep abdominal musculature first
    • Get muscles to fire properly
    • Necessary for injury reduction
  • 19. Torso Movements
    • FLEXION- shoulders to hips; hips to shoulders
    • EXTENSION- trunk and hip
    • LATERAL FLEXION
    • ROTATION- upper and lower body
    • STABILITY- prone, supine, and lateral
  • 20. Medicine Balls
    • Great to teach force production, reduction, and transfer
    • Can use alone or with partners
    • Cue to throw with torso rather than arms
    • Involve as many joints as possible
    • Functional Torso Training
  • 21. Medicine Ball Movements
    • VERTICAL - Extension and Flexion
    • HORIZONTAL-Overhead, Chest Level, Extension
    • ROTATIONAL - Front, Side, Back
  • 22. Develop Modules
    • Develop Modules to fit into your training template
    • Develop systematic progressions
    • Treat Torso Training like any other component of performance (i.e. sets, reps, volume, TUT)
    • “ Little but often”
    • Devote 5-10 minutes for core work each day
    • Try to cover each movement at least once a week
    • Exception to this is that more stability should be done early on
  • 23. Implementing Modules
    • Develop Modules for all components
    • Develop Modules for each phase
    • Example Workout:
    WC/Hypertrophy emphasis Lift: 15-60 Min Static 1 Recovery: 60-70 Min Trap Series x10 ea Rotator Cuff: 13-15 Min Core 1A Core: 7-13 Min Dynamic Flex 1 Warm up: 0-7 Min PHASE 1- DAY 1 OFF-SEASON Time:
  • 24. Sample Program
    • OFF-SEASON: PHASE 1- Week 1
    Front Twist 2x10 ea Elbow Obliques 2x1o ea Front Twist 2x10 ea Floor Hypers 2x10x2 sec Front Twist 2x10 ea Elbow Obliques 2x10 ea Seated Chest Pass 2x10 Side Lying Abduction 2x10 ea Overhead Pass 2x10 Draw-In Bridges 2x10x2 sec Seated Chest Pass 2x10 4 Way Elbow Bridge 2x20 sec Throw downs 2x10 Kneeling Draw-In 2x5x10 sec Clean & Jerk 2x10 4 Pt.. Draw In 2x5x10 sec Throw downs 2x10 Lying Draw In 2x5x10 sec MB 1A Core 1C MB 1B Core 1B MB 1A Core 1A Sat Fri Thurs Wed Tues Mon
  • 25. Sample Program
    • OFF-SEASON: PHASE 4- Week 1
    1 Arm Chest Pass 2x10 ea Diagonal Chops 2x10 ea Rotational Overhead Pass 2x10 ea (1 extra set for non-dom side) Wide Rotations 2x20 1 Arm Chest Pass 2x10 ea Wood Chops 2x10 Side Pass w/ Step 2x10 ea (1 extra set for non-dom side) 1 Leg Feet Bench Oblique 2x7 ea leg + ea side Side Pass w/ Step 2x10 ea (1 extra set for non-dom side) Overhead DB Side Bends 2x10 ea Side Pass w/ Step 2x10 ea (1 extra set for non-dom side) Off Bench Oblique 2x12 ea (arms overhead) 1 Leg Throwdowns 2x10 ea Partner Pushes 2x20 1 Leg Clean & Jerk 2x10 ea 1 Leg Hypers 2x10 ea 1 Leg Throwdowns 2x10 ea Ball Elbow Bridge 2x30 sec ea MB 4A Core 4C MB 4B Core 4B MB 4A Core 4A Sat Fri Thurs Wed Tues Mon
  • 26. Progressions
    • Muscle re-education
    • Stability
    • Integrate draw-in with dynamic movements
    • Stable to Unstable surfaces
    • Simple to Complex
    • Non-functional to Functional
    • Slow/Controlled to Fast/Explosive Movements
  • 27. Summary
    • Make Torso Training a priority
    • Use a systematic progression
    • Teach How to Draw-In
    • Coach Torso Training like any other component
    • Develop Modules and make sure there is balance between movements

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