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Creating the World’s Most Liveable City by 2040: Transition to Transformation-Walker
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Creating the World’s Most Liveable City by 2040: Transition to Transformation-Walker

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  • Greeting
  • Auckland has undergone massive transition over the last two years We are embarking on an exciting journey and we’d like to share that with you. Since its inception on 1 November 2010, the Auckland Council has provided a new model of local government in New Zealand enabled by the largest amalgamation of local government in Australasia. It gives Auckland unprecedented opportunity to plan an integrated sustainable future, and to be the world’s most liveable city. Auckland is a case study in transformational change at speed. This session outlines the Auckland Plan which sets the long-term strategic direction for Auckland growth, development and social, environmental, economic and cultural well-being. Focus will be on three transformational areas: Auckland’s low carbon development through green growth City centre master planning Auckland Council’s leadership and building legacy opportunities through Rugby World Cup 2011 Sport, art, culture, pride and New Zealand’s clean green brand have been successfully used to engage and generate community support; to inspire passion among Aucklanders for a sustainable city. The ‘how’ of what we do is critical to success.  
  • Click on screen to play video
  • Introduce Auckland Auckland has a critical role to play in New Zealand’s low carbon economic future. It is the largest region in New Zealand. It is home to one-third of the national population and is predicted to have 60 per cent of New Zealand’s population growth over the next thirty years. This growth, provided it is managed effectively, offers significant opportunities. But What makes Auckland special?
  • Auckland’s climate, geographical, cultural and historical character are unique. It offers: a city with islands and a varied marine environment a green rural land mass in easy reach of the city a temperate climate in a southerly location the heritage of tangata whenua Comparatively young- aging but still relatively high proportion young people a diverse city of immigrants with multiple homelands and cultural endowments the central hub for the South Pacific islands an English-speaking, multi-lingual society set in the Asia Pacific region a highly educated, innovative, creative, and ingenious population It is this blend that makes Auckland distinctive.
  • Auckland is a case study in transformational change at speed. In 2009 the Royal Commission on Governance in Auckland recommended that a single council for Auckland be established to address its fragmented governance and poor community engagement, which had contributed to Auckland’s underperformance. Since its inception on 1 November 2010, the Auckland Council has provided a new model of local government in New Zealand. The Council consists of the governing body (Mayor and 20 Councillors) and 21 local boards, which represent the interests of local communities. All at a time when we were hosting RWC 2011 the 3 rd largest global sporting event – behind the Olympics and FIFA world cup. I’ll come back to RWC later and its pivotal role in trnasformation This governance structure strengthens Auckland-wide leadership and provides effective local democracy. Having a single council has given Auckland an unprecedented opportunity to plan for its future in an integrated way, and to bring together actions for better transport, environmental protection, improved land uses, housing growth, and economic development in one plan, and with one authority responsible for their co-ordination. The Auckland Plan sets the long-term strategic direction for Auckland.
  • The Auckland Plan is the strategy to make Auckland an even better place than it is now, and create the world’s most liveable city. The Auckland Plan describes the kind of place Aucklanders have told us they want, and outlines what is needed to achieve it. It shows how we will prepare for the additional one million people we may have to accommodate by 2040, and the 400,000 new homes needed. To achieve this purpose, the Auckland Plan: sets a strategic direction for Auckland and its communities that integrates social, economic, environmental, and cultural objectives outlines a high-level development strategy to give direction and enable coherent, co-ordinated decision-making by Auckland Council and other parties identifies the existing and future location of residential, business, rural production and industrial activities, critical infrastructure facilities (such as transport, water supply, wastewater and stormwater disposal), other network utilities, open space, and social infrastructure identifies nationally and regionally important recreational and open space areas, ecological areas that should be protected from development, environmental constraints on development, and landscapes and areas of historic heritage value identifies the policies, priorities, land allocations, programmes and investments to implement the strategic direction.
  • The six transformational shifts really provide the underlying basis for change
  • City Centre Masterplan is due to be adopted by Auckland Council at a meeting of the Governance Body on the 28 th June. It is intended to be a prospectus for how the city centre can transform over the next 20 years as one of two big ideas for the city region identified in the Auckland Plan. Auckland’s city centre is the economic and cultural hub of the region. Everything we do in the city centre recognises its place in the region as a whole. The masterplan considers three interdependent areas: the central business district (CBD) or Engine Room, the city centre and the city fringe. Below are the city centre’s main opportunities 1. A fantastic natural setting 2. A wonderful waterfront with an active harbour 3. A characteristic topography 4. A strong sense of place, heritage and character 5. A highly accessible place 6. A Māori identity and emerging economy 7. More people living in the city centre city is now home to more than 24,000 people. This number is expected to rise to more than 45,000 by 2032. 8. A university city About 60,000 students 9. The city centre as workplace and tourist destination every working day about 90,000 people come to work in the city centre. Auckland is the gateway to New Zealand and each year over two million visitors arrive in Auckland by air or cruise ship. Challenges – the city centre’s main constraints The city centre faces a number of challenges that this masterplan seeks to address. 1. Planning for growth The lack of affordable unit-titled, owner-occupied housing opportunities The retail sector is underperforming in relative terms. Most workers and students leave the city centre after office hours, which reduces night-time economic activity. 2. Poorly connected to surrounding urban villages The topography, motorway network and harbour limit pedestrian and cycling connections 3. A disconnected waterfront 4. A transport network under strain The City Rail Link, along with other public transport measures, is required to relieve these pressures. 5. An incomplete pedestrian and open space network 6. Destinations too few and far between 7. Loss of our heritage 8. Social infrastructure requirements 9. The city centre’s regional relevance 10. Environmental Sustainability
  • The 20 year vision for transformation of the city centre as the ‘engine room’ of the Auckland economic powerhouse is centred around the City Rail Link. The cost of realising the vision (including CRL, additional harbour crossing, waterfront plan) will be $10billion. $130m of council funding has been allocated to delivering the projects in the masterplan (excluding CRL)
  • Eight moves to transform the city centre: Uniting the waterfront with the city centre Connecting the western edge of the city CBD and retail district – the Engine Room Nurturing an innovation and learning cradle Growth around the City Rail Link – new PT stations & development opportunities Connecting Victoria Park, Albert Park and the Auckland Domain with the waterfront as part of a blue-green network – the Green Link Connecting the city and the fringe Revitalising the waterfront
  • One of the first project to be funded will see Quay Street, where city centre meets waterfront, transformed as a landmark boulevard.
  • Mistakes of the past will be cleared with latent development opportunities realised.
  • Streets throughout the city centre will be redefined as pedestrian first spaces with for example Victoria Street transformed as a green link between two of city centres two premier parks.
  • The motorway network or concrete collar that encircles the city centre will be bridged to promote better connectivity to the residential hinterland
  • Auckland Plan lays the foundation for Auckland’s low carbon, energy resilient transformation through a focus on green growth. This includes a bold target to reduce Auckland’s greenhouse gas emissions by 40% by 2040. This transformation brings many opportunities for our economy, our environment and overall liveability. To achieve this transformation, Auckland council is working with partners and key stakeholders to develop an low carbon Strategy. The strategy will set out a clear roadmap for action. It is a strategy for Auckland, rather than an Auckland Council strategy and its development and implementation will be collaborative and transformational.   Transforming Auckland to a sustainable, low carbon, energy resilient future brings significant benefits and opportunities for our economy, and for the enhancement of our environment and our overall liveability.
  • There are many good reasons to strive towards a low-carbon economy. The low-carbon market is the fastest- growing globally, estimated to be worth £4.3 trillion by 2015. NZTE notes that a clean (low-carbon) economy could result in a $150 billion high-value, low-carbon export economy for New Zealand by 2025. Transforming Auckland to a sustainable, low carbon, energy resilient future brings significant benefits and opportunities for our economy, and for the enhancement of our environment and our overall liveability. This could mean:   New economic opportunities through advanced technologies and innovation. More profitable businesses through increased productivity and competitiveness Auckland’s enhanced profile and reputation as a key export and tourism hub. More warm, dry and energy efficient homes heated adequately by affordable energy Improved air quality, avoiding ill-health and lost productivity, and reduced cost in public spending on health-related issues. An energy efficient transport system with greater choice, greater diversity of fuels and alternative energy technologies. Development and efficient use of diverse energy resources - including renewables. Greater access to secure and affordable energy supplies; Greater resilience to resource scarcity, disruptions to supplies and fluctuating prices (including oil price shocks).   Such transformations also bring challenges, including the need for investment from both the public and private sectors. There are opportunities to use existing funding and to reprioritise existing expenditure. Preliminary analysis suggests that long-term benefits will outweigh costs. Also the sooner we start making the transition, the more manageable will be the economic and social adjustments that will be required. Finding the right balance between short-term costs and long-term benefits will be addressed in developing the energy and climate change mitigation strategy.
  • Auckland’s two largest sources of emissions are transport and stationery, - account for approximately two thirds of our total emissions. For the rest of NZ, emissions from agriculture and energy dominate, and transport accounts for only 20% of emissions. Auckland’s emissions profile is relatively unique internationally, particularly when compared to other similar-sized cities in Australia and North America. This is partly due to New Zealand’s large renewable electricity base, and the high levels of private motor vehicle usage in Auckland. 77% of NZ energy is renewable Auckland accounts for approximately 14 per cent of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The city’s 2009 total gross GHG emissions were 16.4 per cent higher than at 1990, and based on business as usual models are projected to rise another upto 46 per cent by 2025. What does a 40% reduction look like? And how do we get there?
  • What does a 40% reduction look like? And how do we get there?
  • Pursuing a low carbon future will require major changes in terms of Auckland’s land use patterns and urban development, the development of sustainable transport options, structural change in sectors of the economy, as well as widespread behavioural change. The development of the strategy and action plan will identify and evaluate policy options to reach the reduction target. This process will be informed by an analysis of costs and benefits from which a prioritised set of short-, medium- and long-term projects and corresponding targets will be developed. Particular areas of focus will include: PT, TDM, alternative fuels, EV technologies and fuel-efficient vehicles pricing mechanisms (e.g. the NZ ETS, parking charges and road pricing) integrated land-use and transport patterns Renewables, DG, diversification (location, type and scale) of energy energy efficiency and conservation sustainable, energy-efficient buildings (e.g. residential, commercial building standards, retrofits), Eco-cities and low-emission precincts Agriculture, local food production forestry and green infrastructure (e.g. green roofs, urban allotments), carbon sequestration Council leading by example in its own operations and services as a catalyst for change behavioural change, education and awareness.
  • Auckland Council is committed to working with its partners and key stakeholders to identify the most appropriate ways to harness these opportunities by developing an energy and climate change mitigation strategy for Auckland. We have released a discussion document - ‘Powering Auckland’s low carbon transformation’ to seek feedback on a range of issues. It is a strategy for Auckland, rather than an Auckland Council strategy and its development and implementation will be collaborative and transformational.
  • GHG reduction to 40% of 1990 levels This is for the region we are leading by example internally, We using a wide range of technology and programmes to do this. We pull it together – this is the ecowheel – shows what we are doing. It gets darker as we have done more. Put the frame around the eco wheel to turn it into the ecoportal Zoom into three examples.
  • GHG reduction to 40% of 1990 levels This is for the region we are leading by example internally, We using a wide range of technology and programmes to do this. We pull it together – this is the ecowheel – shows what we are doing. It gets darker as we have done more. Put the frame around the eco wheel to turn it into the ecoportal Zoom into three examples.
  • During a time of transition Auckland hosted the 3 rd largest sporting event in the world To a global audience of 75-100 million
  • Our vision was simple....
  • We had five legacy goals
  • ‘ Major events should be key drivers of economic growth and RWC 2011 certainly delivered for Auckland’ – Len Brown (Mayor of Auckland) Delivered under budget (budget nz$89.96m expenditure nz$89.69m (2009-2011)) Instrumental in fostering economic growth and leveraging legacy Provided an economic injection of nz$512m net additional spend Estimated value of deals in the pipeline from RWC 2011 – nz$150m Created more than 14,000 year long jobs Raised the benchmark for public transport in Auckland - Public transport –more than 550,000 to and from matches Number of fans travelling to and from RWC 2011 matches – 744,377 Public transport patronage: 60% for pool matches 75% for the knock out phase Public transport system – utlilised by 72.8% of Eden Park fans Opening Night –200,000 celebrated across the waterfront • Queens Wharf –more than 1 million visitors • Fanzones –almost 100,000 at Albany, Henderson and MangereFinals Night –more than 100,000 celebrated in the CBD and on thewaterfront Volunteer programme 2500 Aucklanders volunteered and donated 150,000 hours of their time Volunteer database of 2500 can now be used for future events 92% of international visitors would recommend Auckland as a destination 750,000 fans attended 15 matches in Auckland 150,000 visitors on opening night Queens Wharf attracted 1.06m visitors RWC 2011 has raised the benchmark for public transport in Auckland Number of fans travelling to and from RWC 2011 matches – 744,377 Public transport patronage: 60% for pool matches 75% for the knock out phase Public transport system – utlilised by 72.8% of Eden Park fans
  • Fan trail – Born as a small part of the transport plan for getting people to and from the Waterfront 120,000 people walked a 4.5km fan trail, linking Auckland’s waterfront to Eden Park stadium Target was 33,000 (42,000 on final night)
  • Auckland surpassed its visitor expectations. During September and October there was a 28 per cent increase on the same period last year • 107,000 arrivals to Auckland for the Tournament –80 per cent of all RWC 2011 arrivals to NZ • The total number of visitors who came to NZ for the event = 133,200 against a forecast of 95,000 from July –October Fanzones –almost 100,000 at three sites Trialled biodiesel generators Finals Night –more than 100,000 celebrated in the CBD and on the waterfront
  • Improvements to CBD and waterfront Clockwise Queens wharf Eden Park redevelopment New waterfront precinct New Events Centre Plus CBD streetscape upgrades (including shared space) Training venue upgrades All suppliers tendering for business subject to sustainable procurement toolkit A green roadmap for business as a legacy resource not a compliance tool 234 tonnes of waste recycled 42% of all recycling at RWC 2011 venues nationwide. 730,159kWh of energy savings at three stadiums (upto 14% reductions in energy use) Energy audits/ improvement programmes

Creating the World’s Most Liveable City by 2040: Transition to Transformation-Walker Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Creating the World’s most liveable city by 2040 Transition to Transformation Councillor Wayne Walker Chair – Environment and Sustainability20 June 2012
  • 2. Content• Message from the Mayor• About Auckland• Transition to transformation• Our vision – to be the world’s most liveable city• Delivering on our vision• Questions and discussion
  • 3. Auckland Now • Population 1.5million (1.4m in urban areas – as highlighted) • Land area 4,894 sq. km • 70% of land is rural • 70% of area is coastal water • 36% New Zealand’s GDP • A Pacific City • 180 ethnicities • 3rd most liveable city in the world (Mercer survey 2011)
  • 4. What makes Auckland special?• Our people• Our environment• Our innovation
  • 5. Auckland in 2040• 1 million more people• Quality compact city• Emissions reduced by 40% (based on 1990 levels)• 90% renewables• Green economy - average GDP growth 5% p.a.• 400,000 more houses
  • 6. Auckland’s Transition to Transformation• Auckland - a case study in transformational change at speed.• 8 councils become 1• Largest council amalgamation in southern hemisphere• Rugby World Cup in 2011• Unprecedented opportunity
  • 7. 1915 AP Workshops, RB, 1-2-12
  • 8. 1945 AP Workshops, RB, 1-2-12
  • 9. 1975 AP Workshops, RB, 1-2-12
  • 10. 2001 AP Workshops, RB, 1-2-12
  • 11. 2008 AP Workshops, RB, 1-2-12
  • 12. 2050? AP Workshops, RB, 1-2-12
  • 13. What is the Auckland Plan?• A 30 year development strategy: – Key enablers/shapers – High level spatial strategy – 13 strategic directions
  • 14. Transformational Shifts• Children and young people first• Environmental action/ green growth• Outstanding public transport/ one network• Quality urban living• High living standards for all/ focus on most in need• Lift Maori (indigenous) well-being
  • 15. Quay Street - Existing Quay Street - Potential
  • 16. Lower Hobson - Existing Lower Hobson - Potential
  • 17. Victoria Street - Existing Victoria Street – Potential
  • 18. Grafton Gully - Existing Grafton Gully - Potential
  • 19. Planning for Auckland’s low carbon transformation
  • 20. Brings opportunities for our economy, environment &liveability“…a possible nz$150 billion high-value, low-carbon export economy for New Zealand by 2025” (New Zealand Trade Enterprise, 2009)
  • 21. Greenhouse gas emissions profile• Transport and electricity account for two thirds of Auckland’s greenhouse gas emissions
  • 22. Greenhouse gas emissions (Trends and projections)• Emissions projected to rise by 39% by 2031(Business as usual)• Other scenarios indicate a rise of up to 46% by 2025 (Taking into account fuel and carbon prices)• Key drivers - transport and energy
  • 23. Potential abatement pathway
  • 24. The way forward• Auckland Energy and Climate change mitigation strategy (by end 2012)• A call to action• A strategy for Auckland, rather than an Auckland Council strategy• Collaborative in development and delivery• Stakeholder-driven• Clear governance structure
  • 25. Leading byExample
  • 26. Auckland Peace City
  • 27. Rugby World Cup 2011
  • 28. Big wins: Economy,visitors & transport• NZ$512m net additional spend• Public transport – ~744,377 to/from games• Games – ~750,000 fans at stadia• ~107,000 arrivals to Auckland for Tournament (80% of all RWC 2011 arrivals to NZ) – 28% increase on same period last year• Total visitors to NZ for the event ~133,200 (forecast ~95,000)
  • 29. Big Wins: The Fan Trail
  • 30. Big Wins: The Fan TrailEvery major event cityshould have a fantrail’ - Sir Richard Branson
  • 31. Big wins: Fanzones
  • 32. Leaving a lasting Legacy
  • 33. “...sometimes it takes a city tolead a nation...” (Len Brown - Mayor of Auckland)
  • 34. For More Information www.theaucklandplan.govt.nz sustainability@aucklandcouncil.govt.nzpaul.chambers@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz robert.perry@aucklandcouncil.govt.nzwayne.walker@aucklandcouncil.govt.nzDiscussion & Questions