Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Mk2 quantifying water user trade offs at yali reservoir vietnam
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Mk2 quantifying water user trade offs at yali reservoir vietnam

952
views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
952
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • The central highland of Vietnam has been known for its dry climate during the dry season. Water supply for irrigation and domestic uses is heavily rely on underground water.There might be a potential for some certain communities living around Yali reservoir to utilise reservoir water without affecting to much on electricity production. To assess this potential utilisation, we carried out a research to Quantify the monthly abstraction totals for water users in the 2km buffer … and to evaluate Social and economic consequence of trading offWater use Keep in mind that this study has not been done for manyHydro-power reservoirs in Vietnam where reservoirs’ main focus is to reserve water for electricity production
  • What would happen if we added water demand of the district into the equation?Water demand for each sub-catchment was calculated (based on district water demand CIEM)Over lay water demand on top of water availability layers i.e. water availability minus water demand to find out Water availability with consumptive use
  • - The map shows surface water availability in Gia Lai and KonTum. Water availability is estimated by subtracting evaporation from precipitation.Daily Precipitation data is from INHEM and daily evaporation data is taken from the 2 monitoring stations Pleiku & KonTum. The study has been done at sub-catchment level i.e. each district in Gia Lai and KonTum was divided into sub-catchments Total water availability annually stays in surplus, Sa Thay district has less water availability than other communes. However it is miss leading if we only looking at annually data as the difference between precipitation in the dry and wet season is significant. As seen on the map, Water availability stays in surplus during the wet season but mostly in deficit during the dry season (only one part of Kbang is in the surphus). During the dry season, severe water stress occurs in Sa Thay district.
  • Total water availability with consumptive use annually and in the wet season stays in surplus however water availability in the dry season stays in deficit
  • If we just look at water availability in the dry season we could see some significant changes.The map on the left shows water availability with no consumptive demandThe map in the middle shows water availability with consumptive demandThe map on the right shows the percentage changes between the two The significant changes occur at Kbang, La Pa, Krong Pa, Ayun Pa. At Kbang, water availability used to be in the surplus now become deficit. Over 36% decrease of water availability occur at La Pa, Krong Pa, Ayun Pa leading to more exposure of water stress. Water shortage is critical within and around Sa Thay. The critical area is expanded when added consumptive demand. Thus increase water stress within the area.
  • As mentioned before water availability stays in surplus during the wet season and mostly in deficit during the dry season. Critical water stress occurs within and around Sa Thay where Yali reservoir located.The 2km buffer area lies in the in the red and orange zone which are over 300mm of water deficit in the dry season. Water availability would be critical for agriculture and domestic use of communities living in this area in the dry season. Small contribution of water from the reservoir could relive this water stress. What would be the impact on power production if water from the reservoir could be used for agriculture and domestic use? Hydrological model was set up to analyse the impact.
  • Using MODSIM hydrological model,a Decision Support System,which is developed by Colorado State UniversityThe model was constructed using:Daily nature inflow to the reservoir (Hydrological modeling Vmod developed under MK3 project) Daily precipitation and evaporation from Kon Tm monitoring stationWater demand of 2km buffer area around Yali reservoir (mentioned in section 1 by CIEM)Storage capacity and power generation (Hydropower modeling CSUDP developed under MK3 project)Water into reservoir: Inflow & precipitationWater out of reservoir: Evaporation & demandGenerate electricity: outflow
  • Scenario 1 – Baseline - Reservoir is managed exclusively for hydropower productionThe modeling results show that …The graph shows the live storage capacity and energy production for 5 years from Jan 2001 to the end of 2005 (when we have available data)Most year, reservoir is full, live storage is at1 billion m3, during the wet season (from mid August to end of Oct). Consequently, energy production is at its max generation of 17,000kWh (from June to Nov)
  • Scenario 2 - Reservoir water is used to meet the total water demand by agriculture, domestic and aquaculture uses within a 2km buffer zoneAs mentioned in section 1, the total annual demand is 81,328,065m3. Based on the demand on each season, monthly water demand was estimated for the model input. Water demand in the four month beginning of the year is higher than in other months
  • The graph is showing changes in live storage capacity and power production between scenario 2 and baseline (Results from the modeling)In the wet season, The reservoir mostly full thus there isn’t much change in power production.However in the dry season when active storage capacity is almost equal to zero. What is left from inflow minus net evaporation and demand will be input for electricity generation. Therefore daily power production could be reduced by up to 16%.Difference changes of storage capacity in June just shows that inflow and precipitation pick up in June, with water demand, it takes longer to fill up the reservoir than baseline.
  • Looking at average active storage capacity and total power production annually, in the dry and wet season.The graph shows the difference results of scenario 2 compare with baseline
  • Transcript

    • 1. QUANTIFYING WATER USER TRADE OFFS AT YALI RESERVOIR Bamboo Green Hotel Da Nang, 17th Sept 2013 Nguyen Viet Anh, Tarek Ketelsen, Mai Ky Vinh MK2: Valuing Multiple uses of reservoir waters: WorldFish – ICEM –IFPRI – CIEM – DLOF - CEPA
    • 2. Contents Characteristics of water use demand Hydrological Characteristics Cost and benefit evaluations between water users • CIEM carried out the survey within 2km buffer of Yali reservoir • Surface water availability • Reservoir water allocation & flows • Storage capacity and hydro- electricity production • Economic costs & benefits • Social costs and benefits • Conclusion
    • 3. Research scope • Water shortage occurs in Yali catchment during the dry season which is affecting agriculture and aquaculture production which are important for the provincial economy • Yali reservoir has capacity to provide dry season supply, but has not been utilized by provincial users because it was built for electricity production • There is a perceived water conflict between electricity production and consumptive use by surrounding communities • The study investigates how significant is this conflict? What is the trade off in electricity production if some reservoir waters are used for community abstraction?
    • 4. Water consumption Item Water Demand (m3/year) 81,328,065 1. Domestic use 937,090 2. Agriculture 76,597,400 Rice 22,160,922 Corn 372,918 Casava 480,971 Tea 10,876,500 Coffee 24,478,816 Sugar cain 17,588,870 Rubber 638,402 3. Aquaculture 360,000 4. Livestock 3,433,575 Cattle 1,209,642 Pig 423,206 Poultry 1,800,727
    • 5. Overview of the methodology _ Water availability Water demand Water availability with consumptive use Identify critical areas Rainfall Inflow Water demand Evaporation _ + _ Outflow Power Production
    • 6. Surface water availability: Moisture budget without consumptive use
    • 7. Surface water availability: with consumptive use
    • 8. Water availability in the dry season
    • 9. Surface water availability • Water availability stays in surplus during the wet season and mostly in deficit during the dry season • Surface water stress occurs around Yali reservoir catchment during the dry season (over 300mm deficit) • Small contribution of water from the reservoir could be used for irrigation within 2km buffer area • What would be the impact on power production?
    • 10. Hydrological Model • Using MODSIM hydrological model which is developed by Colorado State University • The model was constructed using the following data: – Daily nature inflow to the reservoir (VMOD) – Daily precipitation and evaporation – Water demand – Storage capacity and power generation (CSUPD) Evaporation Precipitation
    • 11. Scenario 1 - Baseline • Reservoir is managed exclusively for hydropower production – On average, the reservoir is full for 78 days over a year (21%) – Average annual power generated is 3,595 GWh 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 600,000 700,000 800,000 900,000 1,000,000 Jan-01 Jan-02 Jan-03 Jan-04 Jan-05 Energy(KWh) LiveStorageCapacity(1000m3) Reservoir storage Power generation
    • 12. Scenario 2 • Reservoir water is used to meet 100% of the total water demand by agriculture, domestic and aquaculture uses within a 2km buffer zone around the reservoir • Annual water demand is 81,328,065m3 0 1000000 2000000 3000000 4000000 5000000 6000000 7000000 8000000 9000000 10000000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Waterdemand(m3)
    • 13. -20% -18% -16% -14% -12% -10% -8% -6% -4% -2% 0% Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Change Reservoir storage Power generation Scenario 2 compared to Baseline Wet season
    • 14. Scenario 2 findings • Annual storage capacity and power production are expected to reduce by 0.7% and 1% respectively • Storage capacity in the dry season is reduced by 3.6% (493m3 daily) • Power production in the dry season is reduced by 3.5% (3,194kWh) • Annual economical cost from power generation reduction is 462,000USD of which 83% of the loss occurs during the dry season • However most of electricity is generated during the wet season. Dry season production is only 22% of the yearly production -4.0% -3.5% -3.0% -2.5% -2.0% -1.5% -1.0% -0.5% 0.0% Annually Dry season Wet season Change(%) Storage capacity Power generation
    • 15. Conclusions of the water availability assessment • Relatively small change for hydro power production (i.e. 1% energy reduction annually) can have big impact on communities surrounding Yali reservoir (within 2km). Especially in the dry season, when there is water stress and higher dependency on groundwater. • 462,000USD loss from electricity production could bring greater benefit for surrounding community
    • 16. Thank you!