IBM XIV Gen3 Storage SystemStorage built for VMware vSphere infrastructures                   Peter Kisich IBM Systems and...
Table of contentsAbstract....................................................................................................
AbstractThis paper provides information about integration, feature description, and ordering considerations forthe IBM XIV...
The XIV Gen3 Storage System from IBM provides an advanced grid architecture that is built for dynamicvirtual infrastructur...
VAAIVirtualization administrators look for ways to improve scalability, performance, and efficiency of theirvSphere infras...
Figure 2: Full copy primitiveHere, the ESX server is removed from the data path of the data copy when hardware copy is ena...
System Interface (SCSI) reservations to handle distributive lock management. When there is a change tothe metadata of the ...
Block zeroing (write same)Block zeroing is designed to reduce the amount of processor and storage I/O utilization required...
Figure 5: VASA block diagramAdding VASA support that is available in vSphere 5, allows VMware and Cloud administrators ins...
The XIV GUI provides simplicity and functionality unmatched in the industry today. This leading andforward design has carr...
Through advanced XIV virtualization, storage replication configurations can be completed with drag anddrop and right-click...
Snapshot management in vSphereIBM Tivoli® Storage FlashCopy® Manager allows administrators to manage, schedule, and recove...
as primary volumes) ensuring enterprise-class read and write performance while eliminating the need forprocessing and spac...
SummaryThe IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System provides a solid foundation for vSphere. The automation provided bythe XIV system r...
Appendix A: Ordering options for the XIV Gen3 Storage SystemThe XIV Gen3 Storage System is ordered according to the capaci...
Initial configuration options for the XIV Gen3 are shown in Table 2.Number of                          6       9       10 ...
60                         50                         40                                                                  ...
Appendix B: SAN ordering considerationsThe SAN ordering considerations include queue depth, multipathing, and zoning and c...
In this example, a zone should be created for each initiator. Depending on the SAN vendorrecommendations, all the six path...
ResourcesThe following websites provide useful references to supplement the information contained in this paper:          ...
Trademarks and special notices© Copyright IBM Corporation 2011. All rights Reserved.References in this document to IBM pro...
presented here to communicate IBMs current investment and development activities as a good faith effortto help with our cu...
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Transcript of "IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System"

  1. 1. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage SystemStorage built for VMware vSphere infrastructures Peter Kisich IBM Systems and Technology Group ISV Enablement October 2011 © Copyright IBM Corporation, 2011
  2. 2. Table of contentsAbstract........................................................................................................................................1Introduction .................................................................................................................................1New in the IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System................................................................................1Key integration with vSphere.....................................................................................................2VAAI..............................................................................................................................................3 Full copy................................................................................................................................................... 3 How effective is the offload process? ...................................................................................................... 4 Hardware-assisted locking (atomic test and set)..................................................................................... 4 Block zeroing (write same) ...................................................................................................................... 6vStorage APIs for Array Awareness..........................................................................................6IBM System Storage Plug-in for vCenter ..................................................................................7Storage Replication Adapter (SRA) ...........................................................................................8Snapshot management in vSphere .........................................................................................10QoS options...............................................................................................................................11Summary....................................................................................................................................12Appendix A: Ordering options for the XIV Gen3 Storage System........................................13Appendix B: SAN ordering considerations ............................................................................16Resources..................................................................................................................................18About the author .......................................................................................................................18Trademarks and special notices..............................................................................................19 IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System
  3. 3. AbstractThis paper provides information about integration, feature description, and ordering considerations forthe IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System for VMware vSphere 4 and 5 infrastructures.IntroductionThe IBM® XIV® Gen3 Storage System employs an advanced auto-balancing architecture built for today’sdynamic data centers with an eye towards tomorrow. With industry-leading storage software and a high-speed InfiniBand® grid, the XIV Gen3 system delivers storage features and required performancedemanded in VMware infrastructures including:  VMware vStorage APIs for Array Integration (VAAI)  vStorage APIs for Storage Awareness (VASA) integration  Storage Replication Adapter for Site Recovery Manager  Centralized management in vCenter  Quality of service (QoS) features for mixed workload priorities  Automation and simplicity for virtual infrastructures  Co-development for VMware vSphere 5, and beyondThe global partnership with IBM and VMware, coupled with the forward-thinking architecture of the XIVGen3, provides a solid foundation for virtual infrastructures today and in the future.New in the IBM XIV Gen3 Storage SystemAll data modules in the XIV Gen3 Storage System are interconnected with a high speed, low latencyInfiniBand fabric setting a new standard of performance and response time. The XIV Gen3 system thenautomates the storage configuration of the high performance architecture to ensure that every diskallocated to VMware will have optimal performance. Infiniband SwitchingFigure 1: Data stores optimally distributed across all spindles, processors, and cache IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 1
  4. 4. The XIV Gen3 Storage System from IBM provides an advanced grid architecture that is built for dynamicvirtual infrastructures. All volumes allocated to VMware are balanced across all processors, spindles andcache in the XIV system. Automated data distribution by the XIV Gen3 system provides a perfectlybalanced configuration that avoids hot spots and ensures maximum performance.Also, new in the XIV Gen3, is the introduction of solid-state drive (SSD) slots that can enable an optionalfield upgrade of 7.5 TB of secondary cache in 2012. This secondary cache can provide an automatedstaging area for frequently accessed data improving performance for even the highest transactional anddatabase workloads.Key integration with vSphereAlong with the great synergy provided by the enhanced XIV Gen3 architecture, IBM provides integratedsoftware for vSphere for every XIV system such as:  VAAI  vStorage APIs for Storage Awareness  IBM Storage Management Console for VMware vCenter  Storage Replication Adapter (SRA) for Site Recovery Manager  Snapshot management in vCenter  QoS for mixed workload priorities IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 2
  5. 5. VAAIVirtualization administrators look for ways to improve scalability, performance, and efficiency of theirvSphere infrastructure. One way is by utilizing storage integration with VMware VAAI. VAAI is a set ofAPIs or primitives that allow vSphere infrastructures to offload processing of data-related tasks, which canburden a VMware ESX server. Utilizing a storage platform with VAAI enabled, similar to the IBM XIVStorage System, can provide significant improvements in vSphere performance, scalability, andavailability.Adding the VAAI driver for XIV enables the following primitives:  Full copy (also known as hardware copy offload): − Benefit: Considerable boost in system performance and fast completion of copy operations; minimizes host processing and network traffic  Hardware-assisted locking (also known as atomic test and set): Replacement of the SCSI-2 lock/reservation in Virtual Machine File System (VMFS) − Benefit: Significantly improves scalability and performance  Block zeroing (also known as write same) − Benefit: Reduces the amount of processor effort, and input/output operations per second (IOPS) required to write zeroes across an entire EagerZeroedThick (EZT) Virtual Machine Disk (VMDK)XIV system now provides full support for VAAI. The following sections describe each of these primitives.Full copyTasks such as Virtual Machine (VM) provisioning and VM migration are part of everyday activities of mostVMware administrators. As the virtual environment continues to scale, it is important to monitor the overallimpact that these activities have on the VMware infrastructure.Toggle hardware assisted copy by changing the DataMover.HardwareAcceleratedMove parameter in theAdvanced Settings tab in vSphere Virtual Center to 1.When the value for hardware acceleration is 1, the data path changes for tasks such as Storage vMotion,as illustrated in Figure 2. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 3
  6. 6. Figure 2: Full copy primitiveHere, the ESX server is removed from the data path of the data copy when hardware copy is enabled.Removing copy transactions from the server workload greatly increases the speed of these copy functionswhile reducing the impact to the ESX server.How effective is the offload process?During IBM lab testing, data retrieved from the VMware monitoring tool, esxtop showed that commandsper second on the ESX host were reduced by a factor of 10. Copy time reduction varies depending on theVM but is usually significant (over 50% for most profiles).A few examples of this performance boost at customer data centers are shown in Table 1. Time reduction Customer Test Before VAAI After VAAI (in percentage)Major Financial 2 VMs 433 Sec 180 sec 59%Electric Company 2 VMs 944 sec 517 sec 45%Petroleum 40 VMs 1 hour 20 min 67%CompanyTable 1: Field results for full copyFull copy effect: Thousands of commands and IOPs on the ESX server are freed up for other tasks andpromote greater scalability.Hardware-assisted locking (atomic test and set)Just as important as the demonstrated effect of hardware-assisted copy, the hardware-assisted lockingprimitive also greatly enhances VMware cluster scalability and disk operations by preventing diskcorruptions of the clustered file system (VMFS) with tighter granularity and efficiency.It is important to understand why locking occurs in the first place. For block storage environments,VMware data stores are formatted with VMFS. VMFS is a clustered file system that uses Small Computer IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 4
  7. 7. System Interface (SCSI) reservations to handle distributive lock management. When there is a change tothe metadata of the file system by an ESX server, the SCSI reservation process ensures that sharedresources do not overlap with other connected ESX hosts by obtaining exclusive access to the logical unitnumber (LUN).A SCSI reservation is created on VMFS when (not a complete list):  VMDK is first created  VMDK is deleted  VMDK is migrated  VMDK is created via a template  A template is created from a VMDK  Creating or deleting VM snapshots  VM is switched on or offAlthough normal I/O operations do not require this mechanism, these boundary conditions have becomemore common as features such as vMotion with Distributed Resource Scheduler (DRS) are used morefrequently. This SCSI reservation design leads to early storage area network (SAN) best practices forvSphere to dictate a limit in cluster size for block storage (about 8 to 10 ESX hosts).With hardware-assisted locking, the LUN locking processing is transferred to the storage system. Thisreduces the number of commands required to access a lock, provides locks to be more granular, andleads to better scalability of the virtual infrastructure. V V V V V V M M M M M M D D D D D D K K K K K KFigure 3: Atomic test and set primitiveHardware-assisted locking effect: Hardware-assisted locking will increase VMs per data store, ESXservers per data store, and overall performance. This functionality coupled with 60 cores and 360 GB ofmemory for the XIV Gen3 Storage System yields best in industry scalability and performance. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 5
  8. 8. Block zeroing (write same)Block zeroing is designed to reduce the amount of processor and storage I/O utilization required to writezeroes across an entire EZT VMDK when it is created. With the block zeroing primitive, zeroing operationfor EZT VMDK files are offloaded to the XIV Storage System without the host having to issue severalcommands. Figure 4: the write same primitiveBlock zeroing effect: Block zeroing reduced overhead and provided better performance for creating EZTvirtual disks. With XIV, EZT volumes are available immediately through fast write caching and de-staging.VAAI support on XIV storage systems liberates value compute resources in the virtual infrastructureOffloading processor and disk intensive activities from the ESX server to the storage system providessignificant improvements in vSphere performance, scalability and availability.Note: Before installing the VAAI driver for the XIV storage system, ensure 10.2.4a or higher is the installedmicrocode. For vSphere 5.x and higher, the VAAI driver is no longer required for IBM Storage.vStorage APIs for Array AwarenessThe IBM Storage provider for VMware VASA provides even more real-time information about the XIVStorage System. The IBM XIV Storage System VASA provider for VMware vCenter adds:  Real-time disk status  Real-time alerts and events from the XIV Storage System to vCenter  Support for multiple vCenter consoles and multiple XIV Storage Systems  Continuous monitoring through storage monitoring service for vSphere  Support for policy-driven storage profiles IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 6
  9. 9. Figure 5: VASA block diagramAdding VASA support that is available in vSphere 5, allows VMware and Cloud administrators insights tohelp provide improved availability, performance, and management of the storage infrastructure.In addition to VASA, the XIV Storage System also provides a vCenter Plug-in for vSphere 4 andvSphere 5, which extends management of the storage to provisioning, mapping, and monitoring ofreplication, snapshots, and capacity.IBM System Storage Plug-in for vCenterThe IBM System Storage Plug-in for vCenter couples the XIV architecture advantages with powerfulstorage management tools. Features include:  Volume creation  Mapping and automated discovery  Configuration optimization  Capacity reports and monitoring  Snapshot details  Replication status (RPO)With these plug-in tools, management processes and operations can be streamlined in vSphereinfrastructures. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 7
  10. 10. The XIV GUI provides simplicity and functionality unmatched in the industry today. This leading andforward design has carried over to the vCenter plug-in. Combining the plug-in with the automation appliedto every LUN created on the XIV storage system ensures that storage provisioned from vCenter willalways be optimally placed in the storage configuration.Along with strong functionality, the IBM XIV vCenter Storage Plug-in maintains strong secure use ofstorage administration tasks with multiple levels of access.Storage Replication Adapter (SRA)Site Recovery Manager is a VMware product for managing, testing and automating disaster recoveryworkflows.The SRA is a critical part of Site Recovery Manager deployment, but it is supplied by the storage vendorrather than VMware.The XIV SRA not only provides the underlying disk-based replication with VMware awareness but alsogreatly simplifies disk replication without additional complexity and hardware components required byother vendor solutions. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 8
  11. 11. Through advanced XIV virtualization, storage replication configurations can be completed with drag anddrop and right-click automation.Figure 6: Drag-and-drop replication configurationSite Recovery Manager provides powerful testing capabilities. Disaster recovery scripts can be testedusing XIV high performance and incremental snapshots at the remote site. These tests not only provide adeep understanding of the potential point in time recovery, which is recovery point objective (RPO), butalso the time it takes to recover, which is recovery time objective (RTO).The software for Site Recovery Manager integration is included with the XIV Storage System, and you candownload it directly from the IBM website at: ibm.com/systems/storage/disk/xiv/ IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 9
  12. 12. Snapshot management in vSphereIBM Tivoli® Storage FlashCopy® Manager allows administrators to manage, schedule, and recoversnapshots on the IBM XIV Storage Systems directly from the vCenter GUI. Figure 7: vCenter consoleAlong with management capabilities, snapshots taken in VMware integrate with the VMware snapshotprocess to ensure that all VMs are recoverable when restored.When taking a snapshot in vCenter:  FlashCopy Manager initiates a VMware software snapshot of the VM through the vSphere API  FlashCopy Manager determines the LUN(s) that are associated with the virtual machine  FlashCopy Manager invokes a hardware snapshot, creating a persistent copy of the virtual disk(s) and associated VMware snapshots  The hardware snapshot is kept for restore until specified for deletion through user-created policies Figure 8: Snapshot processIBM XIV Storage System performs snapshots with virtually no overhead with re-direct on write technology.Snapshots are made without the overhead associated with copy on write snapshot processing used byother vendor solutions. Adding to this efficiency, XIV incremental snapshots are optimally configured (just IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 10
  13. 13. as primary volumes) ensuring enterprise-class read and write performance while eliminating the need forprocessing and space overhead. QoS optionsAs data center consolidation rates accelerate, there is a larger demand to apply different priorities toVMware workloads and better balance workloads on storage devices. These features include:  Storage I/O Control (SIOC)  Storage DRSIn addition to full support for these features, the XIV Storage System provides an always autobalancedstorage configuration. If throttling particular storage is required, the XIV also provides advanced andtunable QoS features on the storage system.The combination of VMware features and storage features for QoS provides the maximum flexibility andgranularity when applying restricted or limited storage resource allocation to vSphere.SIOCWith SIOC, VMware administrators can apply restricted storage performance access to a virtual disk on adata store in vSphere. This function fits well with the always balanced disk performance provisioned for theXIV Gen3 Storage System. That is, with the XIV, storage is physically optimized by default and vSphereadministrators need to restrict only virtual disks and machines that might conflict with higher priority virtualsystems.Storage DRSStorage DRS establishes data store clusters. The data store clusters allow the dynamic transfer of virtualdisks to different data stores according to the policies set in DRS. The XIV Storage System supportsstorage DRS but also provides a more global approach to load balancing.All storage created for vSphere on the XIV system is balanced across all processors, ports, spindles, andcache modules in the XIV Storage System. The XIV Gen3 storage configuration in optimal balanceprevents hitting thresholds and triggers that set off redistribution of disk resources.Storage QoS on the XIV Storage SystemBy default, the XIV Storage System provides optimal performance for all the disks provisioned to vSphere.There might be requirements for limiting host performance to the disk. With the XIV system, you canrestrict the IOPS or bandwidth provided to a host or group of hosts.The XIV system gives you the choice of utilizing VMware QoS features or off-loading performancemanagement to the hardware. Scalable QoS in XIV Gen3 gives cloud administrators maximum flexibilityfor managing storage resources across the diverse workloads in consolidated vSphere infrastructures. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 11
  14. 14. SummaryThe IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System provides a solid foundation for vSphere. The automation provided bythe XIV system reduces the steps required to realize outstanding storage performance and functionality forVMware environments. This coupled with a strong global partnership between VMware and IBM ensuresthat the IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System continues to lead for vSphere infrastructures today and in thefuture.You can find more information about the IBM XIV Gen3 at: ibm.com/systems/storage/disk/xiv/ IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 12
  15. 15. Appendix A: Ordering options for the XIV Gen3 Storage SystemThe XIV Gen3 Storage System is ordered according to the capacity required. The minimum physicalinstallation is six data modules yielding 55 TB of usable storage (there is also a Capacity on Demand(CoD) plan allowing a three-module 28 TB minimum entry point). Although 28 TB is the minimumconfiguration for XIV using CoD, it is appropriate only for storage requirements that will grow to at least55TB in a one- to three-year period.Figure 9: XIV Gen3 Internal Components IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 13
  16. 16. Initial configuration options for the XIV Gen3 are shown in Table 2.Number of 6 9 10 11 12 13 14 15data modulesNumber of disks 72 108 120 132 144 156 168 180Usable capacity TBs 55 88 102 111 125 134 149 161(2-TB drives)Usable capacity TBs 84 132 154 168 190 203 225 243(3-TB drives)Fibre Channel (FC) 8 16 16 20 20 24 24 24ports (8 GB)Processor (Quad 6 9 10 11 12 13 14 15core)Memory (GB) 144 216 240 264 288 312 336 360Table 2: Configuration options for XIV Gen3 Storage SystemIf ordered initially with less than 15 data modules, the XIV Gen3 Storage System can be upgraded usingthe increments in the above table. Additional capacity, processing, connectivity and cache can all beadded on-the-fly without disruption or performance impact.Capacity on demand (CoD)With the CoD ordering option for the XIV Gen3 Storage System, customers benefit from the fullprocessing, caching, and drive spindle performance of the physically deployed system; yet only an initialusable capacity is purchased.The minimum usable capacity purchased in a CoD configuration is 28 TB (other initial increments areavailable). This minimum entry point consists of three CoD data modules and three CoD I/O data modules.As shown in Figure 10, this configuration provides 28 TB of purchased capacity and 27 TB of in-placeexpansion.Although there is a slight premium per usable TB for CoD options, the performance of CoD purchasedcapacity benefits from the additional processor, memory, FC ports, and spindles in a base 55 TBconfiguration. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 14
  17. 17. 60 50 40 Un-act. 30 Active 20 10 0 TBu Figure 10: Available in-place upgrade with CoDFor more information about the CoD program as well as terms and conditions, contact your IBMrepresentative or authorized partner. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 15
  18. 18. Appendix B: SAN ordering considerationsThe SAN ordering considerations include queue depth, multipathing, and zoning and cabling.Queue DepthIn general, the queue depth setting in the host bus adapter (HBA) has to be extended as consolidationscales higher and I/O requirements are high. Refer to IBM Redbooks® mentioned in the “Resources”section.MultipathingRound robin policy should be implemented for each LUN from the XIV. This will achieve the bestperformance results.VMware 4.1 update 1 and higher versions will automatically detect XIV and set the round robin policy.VMware 5.x and higher versions can automatically detect XIV and set the round robin policy.Zoning and cablingAs the XIV Storage System is an active grid, ensure that the workload from VMware is balanced across allthe six I/O controllers. A typical cabling diagram is shown in Figure 11. All the paths are active and use native VMware round robin multipathing.Figure 11: A typical cabling diagram IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 16
  19. 19. In this example, a zone should be created for each initiator. Depending on the SAN vendorrecommendations, all the six paths can then be added to that zone or separate zones can be created foreach initiator / target path. Consult your SAN fabric vendor for best practices.The end results provide a path from each host initiator to all the six targets cabled in the diagram. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 17
  20. 20. ResourcesThe following websites provide useful references to supplement the information contained in this paper:  IBM Systems on PartnerWorld ibm.com/partnerworld/systems  IBM Redbooks ibm.com/redbooks  XIV Storage System: Host Attachment and Interoperability ibm.com/redbooks/abstracts/sg247904.html  IBM Publications Center www.elink.ibmlink.ibm.com/public/applications/publications/cgibin/pbi.cgi?CTY=USAbout the authorAt IBM, Peter Kisich works closely with storage development organizations and field solutions architects toensure that IBM technologies can continue to innovate and build solutions for enterprise cloudenvironments. An accomplished speaker, Mr. Kisich presents the value of IBM storage for virtualinfrastructures to the global community of IBM customers, Business Partners and employees.Before IBM, Pete Kisich served as a Technical Alliance Manager for VMware, supporting storage partnersNetApp, Hitachi, and Oracle. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 18
  21. 21. Trademarks and special notices© Copyright IBM Corporation 2011. All rights Reserved.References in this document to IBM products or services do not imply that IBM intends to make themavailable in every country.IBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International BusinessMachines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. If these and other IBM trademarkedterms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with a trademark symbol (® or ™), thesesymbols indicate U.S. registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this informationwas published. Such trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. Acurrent list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at "Copyright and trademark information" atwww.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml.Java and all Java-based trademarks and logos are trademarks or registered trademarks of Oracle and/orits affiliates.Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in theUnited States, other countries, or both.Intel, Intel Inside (logos), MMX, and Pentium are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both.UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.SET and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure Electronic Transaction LLC.Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.Information is provided "AS IS" without warranty of any kind.All customer examples described are presented as illustrations of how those customers have used IBMproducts and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performancecharacteristics may vary by customer.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from a supplier of these products, publishedannouncement material, or other publicly available sources and does not constitute an endorsement ofsuch products by IBM. Sources for non-IBM list prices and performance numbers are taken from publiclyavailable information, including vendor announcements and vendor worldwide homepages. IBM has nottested these products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance, capability, or any other claimsrelated to non-IBM products. Questions on the capability of non-IBM products should be addressed to thesupplier of those products.All statements regarding IBM future direction and intent are subject to change or withdrawal without notice,and represent goals and objectives only. Contact your local IBM office or IBM authorized reseller for thefull text of the specific Statement of Direction.Some information addresses anticipated future capabilities. Such information is not intended as a definitivestatement of a commitment to specific levels of performance, function or delivery schedules with respect toany future products. Such commitments are only made in IBM product announcements. The information is IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 19
  22. 22. presented here to communicate IBMs current investment and development activities as a good faith effortto help with our customers future planning.Performance is based on measurements and projections using standard IBM benchmarks in a controlledenvironment. The actual throughput or performance that any user will experience will vary depending uponconsiderations such as the amount of multiprogramming in the users job stream, the I/O configuration, thestorage configuration, and the workload processed. Therefore, no assurance can be given that anindividual user will achieve throughput or performance improvements equivalent to the ratios stated here.Photographs shown are of engineering prototypes. Changes may be incorporated in production models.Any references in this information to non-IBM websites are provided for convenience only and do not inany manner serve as an endorsement of those websites. The materials at those websites are not part ofthe materials for this IBM product and use of those websites is at your own risk. IBM XIV Gen3 Storage System 20

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