ibm.com/redbooksIBM PowerVM VirtualizationIntroduction and ConfigurationStuart DevenishIngo DimmerRafael FolcoMark RoyStep...
IBM PowerVM VirtualizationIntroduction and ConfigurationJune 2011International Technical Support OrganizationSG24-7940-04
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2010-2011. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restr...
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. iiiContentsFigures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
iv IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.4.2 POWER7-specific Linux programming support. . . . . . . ....
Contents v2.6.1 IVM setup guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1042.6.2 Parti...
vi IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration2.15.1 Dedicated-processor partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . ...
Contents vii3.7.1 Creating a reserved storage device pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3503.7.2 Creating a susp...
viii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration5.2.1 Configuring Network Interface Backup . . . . . . . . ....
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. ixFigures2-1 Example of virtualization activation codes website . . ...
x IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration2-39 The VID is placed in the extended Ethernet header . . . . ...
Figures xi3-19 HMC Menu Profile Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2453-20 HMC The cr...
xii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration3-62 The SMS menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
Figures xiii3-105 Successful validation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3683-10...
xiv IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration5-13 IBM i SST Display disk configuration status . . . . . . ...
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xvTables1-1 PowerVM capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....
xvi IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xviiNoticesThis information was developed for products and services ...
xviii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationCOPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample applicat...
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xixPrefaceThis IBM® Redbooks® publication provides an introduction t...
xx IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationIngo Dimmer is an IBM Consulting IT Specialist for IBM i and a...
Preface xxiNaoya Takizawa is an IT Specialist for Power Systems and AIX in IBM JapanSystems Engineering that provides a pa...
xxii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationAuthors of the third edition, Advanced POWER Virtualization ...
Preface xxiiiStay connected to IBM RedbooksFind us on Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/IBMRedbooksFollow us on Twitter:htt...
xxiv IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xxvSummary of changesThis section describes the technical changes ma...
xxvi IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationChanged informationSections describing the concepts and setu...
© Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. 1Chapter 1. IntroductionBusinesses are turning to PowerVM virtualiza...
2 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.1 The value of virtualization on Power SystemsAs you look for...
Chapter 1. Introduction 3PowerVM Standard Edition:PowerVM Standard Edition provides advanced virtualization functionality ...
4 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.2.2 Logical partitionsLogical partitions (LPARs) and virtuali...
Chapter 1. Introduction 5Processing modeWhen you create a logical partition, you can assign entire processors fordedicated...
6 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.2.3 Virtual I/O ServerAs part of PowerVM, the Virtual I/O Ser...
Chapter 1. Introduction 71.2.4 I/O VirtualizationCombined with features designed into the POWER processors, the POWERHyper...
8 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationVirtual Ethernet technologiesVirtualizing Ethernet on a Power S...
Chapter 1. Introduction 9Depending on the system configuration, the operating system console can beprovided by the Hardwar...
10 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationFor more information about PowerVM Lx86, see the following web...
Chapter 1. Introduction 11Suspend capable partitions are available on POWER7 Systems and support theAIX operating system. ...
12 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationShared Ethernet AdapterThe Shared Ethernet Adapter (SEA) is a ...
Chapter 1. Introduction 131.2.10 Multiple Shared-Processor PoolsMultiple Shared-Processor Pools (MSPPs) is a capability su...
14 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.2.11 Active Memory SharingActive Memory Sharing is an IBM Po...
Chapter 1. Introduction 151.2.12 PowerVM Live Partition MobilityPowerVM Live Partition Mobility allows you to move a runni...
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Learn about IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration. PowerVM is a combination of hardware, firmware, and software that provides CPU, network, and disk virtualization.This publication is also designed to be an introduction guide for system administrators, providing instructions for tasks like Configuration and creation of partitions and resources on the HMC,Installation and configuration of the Virtual I/O Server, creation and installation of virtualized partitions. For more information on Power Systems, visit http://ibm.co/Lx6hfc.



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IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration

  1. 1. ibm.com/redbooksIBM PowerVM VirtualizationIntroduction and ConfigurationStuart DevenishIngo DimmerRafael FolcoMark RoyStephane SaleurOliver StadlerNaoya TakizawaBasic and advanced configuration ofthe Virtual I/O Server and its clientsUpdated to include newPOWER7 technologiesThe next generation ofPowerVM virtualizationFront cover
  2. 2. IBM PowerVM VirtualizationIntroduction and ConfigurationJune 2011International Technical Support OrganizationSG24-7940-04
  3. 3. © Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2010-2011. All rights reserved.Note to U.S. Government Users Restricted Rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure restricted by GSA ADPSchedule Contract with IBM Corp.Fifth Edition (June 2011)This edition applies to:Version 7, Release 1 of AIX (product number 5765-G98)Version 7, Release 1 of IBM i (product number 5770-SS1)Version 2, Release 2, Modification 10, Fixpack 24, Service pack 1 of the Virtual I/O ServerVersion 7, Release 7, Modification 2 of the HMCVersion EM350, release 85 of the POWER6 System FirmwareVersion AL720, release 80 of the POWER7 System FirmwareNote: Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in“Notices” on page xvii.
  4. 4. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. iiiContentsFigures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ixTables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvNotices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviiTrademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xviiiPreface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xixThe team who wrote this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xixNow you can become a published author, too! . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiiComments welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiiStay connected to IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxiiiSummary of changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvJune 2011, Fifth Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxvChapter 1. Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 The value of virtualization on Power Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2 PowerVM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2.1 PowerVM editions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21.2.2 Logical partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41.2.3 Virtual I/O Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61.2.4 I/O Virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71.2.5 Integrated Virtualization Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91.2.6 PowerVM Lx86 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91.2.7 Virtual Fibre Channel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101.2.8 Partition Suspend and Resume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101.2.9 Shared storage pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121.2.10 Multiple Shared-Processor Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131.2.11 Active Memory Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141.2.12 PowerVM Live Partition Mobility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151.3 Complementary technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161.3.1 Simultaneous multithreading. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161.3.2 POWER processor modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161.3.3 Active Memory Expansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171.3.4 Capacity on Demand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181.3.5 System Planning Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191.4 Operating system support for virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201.4.1 PowerVM features supported . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
  5. 5. iv IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.4.2 POWER7-specific Linux programming support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211.5 Hardware support for virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 231.6 Availability of virtualized systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251.6.1 Reducing and avoiding outages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261.6.2 Serviceability in virtualized environments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271.6.3 Redundant Virtual I/O Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271.7 Security in a virtualized environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271.8 PowerVM Version 2.2 enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281.9 Summary of PowerVM technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29Chapter 2. Virtualization technologies on IBM Power Systems . . . . . . . . 312.1 Editions of the PowerVM feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322.1.1 PowerVM Express Edition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332.1.2 PowerVM Standard Edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 342.1.3 PowerVM Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352.1.4 Activating the PowerVM feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 362.1.5 Summary of PowerVM feature codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392.2 Introduction to the POWER Hypervisor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412.2.1 POWER Hypervisor virtual processor dispatch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 422.2.2 POWER Hypervisor and virtual I/O . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 462.2.3 System port (virtual TTY/console support) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472.3 Overview of Micro-Partitioning technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482.3.1 Micro-partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 482.3.2 Shared-processor pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 572.3.3 Examples of Multiple Shared-Processor Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 772.3.4 Shared dedicated capacity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 832.4 Memory virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 842.4.1 Active Memory Sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 862.4.2 Active Memory Expansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 882.5 Virtual I/O Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 912.5.1 Supported platforms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932.5.2 Virtual I/O Server sizing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932.5.3 Storage virtualization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 942.5.4 Shared Ethernet Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 992.5.5 Network security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 992.5.6 Command line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002.5.7 Hardware Management Console integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002.5.8 System Planning Tool support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002.5.9 Performance Toolbox support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1002.5.10 Integrated Virtualization Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1012.5.11 Tivoli support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1012.5.12 Allowed third party applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1032.6 Integrated Virtualization Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
  6. 6. Contents v2.6.1 IVM setup guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1042.6.2 Partition configuration with IVM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1062.7 Virtual SCSI introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1092.7.1 Partition access to virtual SCSI devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1112.7.2 Shared Storage Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1182.7.3 General virtual SCSI considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1252.8 N_Port ID Virtualization introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1292.8.1 Redundancy configurations for virtual Fibre Channel adapters . . . 1312.8.2 Implementation considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1362.8.3 Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1392.9 Virtual SCSI and NPIV comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1412.9.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1412.9.2 Components and features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1422.10 Virtual Networking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1442.10.1 Virtual Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1452.10.2 Virtual LAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1462.10.3 Virtual switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1552.10.4 Accessing external networks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1592.10.5 Virtual and Shared Ethernet configuration example . . . . . . . . . . . 1642.10.6 Integrated Virtual Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1692.10.7 Performance considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1712.11 IBM i virtual I/O concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1722.11.1 Virtual Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1732.11.2 Virtual SCSI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1742.11.3 N_Port ID Virtualization. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1772.11.4 Multipathing and mirroring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1782.12 Linux virtual I/O concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1802.12.1 Linux device drivers for IBM Power Systems virtual devices . . . . 1802.12.2 Linux as Virtual I/O Server client. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1812.13 Software licensing in a virtualized environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1842.13.1 Software licensing methods for operating systems. . . . . . . . . . . . 1852.13.2 Licensing factors in a virtualized system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1852.13.3 Capacity capping of partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1862.13.4 License planning and license provisioning of IBM software . . . . . 1902.13.5 Sub-capacity licensing for IBM software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1912.13.6 Linux operating system licensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1932.13.7 IBM License Metric Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1932.14 Introduction to simultaneous multithreading . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1952.14.1 POWER processor SMT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1962.14.2 SMT and the operating system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1972.14.3 SMT control in IBM i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012.14.4 SMT control in Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2022.15 Dynamic resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 203
  7. 7. vi IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration2.15.1 Dedicated-processor partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2032.15.2 Micro-partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2032.15.3 Dynamic LPAR operations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2042.15.4 Capacity on Demand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2042.16 Partition Suspend and Resume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2052.16.1 Configuration requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2062.16.2 The Reserved Storage Device Pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2072.16.3 Suspend/Resume and Shared Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2092.16.4 Shutdown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2142.16.5 Recover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2142.16.6 Migrate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 215Chapter 3. Setting up virtualization: The basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2173.1 Getting started. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2183.1.1 Command line interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2183.1.2 Hardware resources managed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2233.1.3 Software packaging and support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2243.1.4 Updating the Virtual I/O Server using fix packs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2253.2 Virtual I/O Server configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2263.2.1 Creating the Virtual I/O Server partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2263.2.2 Virtual I/O Server software installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2463.2.3 Mirroring the Virtual I/O Server rootvg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2523.2.4 Creating a Shared Ethernet Adapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2543.2.5 Defining virtual disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2583.2.6 Virtual SCSI optical devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2723.2.7 Setting up a virtual tape drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2823.2.8 Virtual FC devices using N_Port ID Virtualization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2833.3 Client partition configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2973.3.1 Creating a Virtual I/O Server client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2973.3.2 Dedicated donating processors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3103.3.3 AIX client partition installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3123.3.4 IBM i client partition installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3193.4 Linux client partition installation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3213.4.1 Installing Linux from the network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3213.4.2 Installing Linux from a Virtual Media Library device . . . . . . . . . . . . 3243.5 Using system plans and System Planning Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3243.5.1 Creating a configuration using SPT and deploying on the HMC. . . 3253.5.2 Installing the Virtual I/O Server image using installios . . . . . . . . . . 3383.5.3 Creating an HMC system plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3403.5.4 Exporting an HMC system plan to SPT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3453.5.5 Adding a partition in SPT to be deployed on the HMC . . . . . . . . . . 3453.6 Active Memory Expansion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3473.7 Partition Suspend and Resume. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 350
  8. 8. Contents vii3.7.1 Creating a reserved storage device pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3503.7.2 Creating a suspend and resume capable partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3573.7.3 Validating that a partition is suspend capable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3603.7.4 Suspending a partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3623.7.5 Validating that a partition is resume capable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3673.7.6 Resuming a partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3693.8 Shared Storage Pools configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3723.8.1 Creating a shared storage pool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3733.8.2 Create and map logical units in a shared storage pool . . . . . . . . . . 376Chapter 4. Advanced virtualization configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3794.1 Virtual I/O Server redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3804.2 Virtual storage redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3854.3 Multipathing in the client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3874.3.1 Multipathing in the AIX client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3874.3.2 Multipathing in the IBM i client partition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3914.3.3 Multipathing in the Linux client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3914.4 Multipathing in the Virtual I/O Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3924.4.1 Fibre Channel device configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3934.4.2 hdisk device configuration on the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . 3934.4.3 SDDPCM and third-party multipathing software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3944.5 Mirroring in the client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3944.5.1 AIX LVM mirroring in the client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3944.5.2 IBM i mirroring in the client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3964.5.3 Linux mirroring in the client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3964.6 Virtual Ethernet redundancy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3974.6.1 Shared Ethernet Adapter failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3984.6.2 Network Interface Backup in the client partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4014.6.3 When to use SEA failover or Network Interface Backup. . . . . . . . . 4034.6.4 Using Link Aggregation on the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4044.7 Configuring Multiple Shared-Processor Pools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4074.7.1 Shared-Processor Pool management using the HMC GUI. . . . . . . 4094.7.2 Shared-Processor Pool management using the command line . . . 4154.8 AIX clients supported configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4174.8.1 Supported virtual SCSI configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4174.8.2 IBM PowerHA SystemMirror for AIX virtual I/O clients . . . . . . . . . . 4274.8.3 Concurrent disks in AIX client partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4314.8.4 General Parallel Filesystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433Chapter 5. Configuration scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4355.1 Shared Ethernet Adapter failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4365.1.1 Configuring Shared Ethernet Adapter failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4375.1.2 Testing Shared Ethernet Adapter failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4405.2 Network Interface Backup in the AIX client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442
  9. 9. viii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration5.2.1 Configuring Network Interface Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4435.2.2 Testing Network Interface Backup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4445.3 Linux Ethernet connection bonding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4475.3.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4475.3.2 Testing Ethernet connection bonding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4485.4 Setting up a VLAN. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4505.4.1 Configuring the client partitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4525.4.2 Configuring the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4545.4.3 Ensuring VLAN tags are not stripped on the Virtual I/O Server . . . 4555.4.4 Configuring the Shared Ethernet Adapter for VLAN use. . . . . . . . . 4565.4.5 Extending multiple VLANs into client partitions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4575.4.6 Virtual Ethernet and SEA considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4605.5 Multipathing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4615.5.1 Configuring multipathing in the server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4635.5.2 AIX client multipathing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4705.5.3 IBM i client multipathing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4765.5.4 Linux client multipathing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4895.6 Mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4945.6.1 Configuring the Virtual I/O Server for client mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . 4955.6.2 AIX client LVM mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5005.6.3 IBM i client mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5045.6.4 Linux client mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 528Appendix A. Recent PowerVM enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 533A.1 Tracking the latest virtualization enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 534A.2 New features in Version 2.2 FP24-SP1 of Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . 534A.3 New features in Version 2.1 of Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 536A.4 Other PowerVM enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537A.5 New features in Version 1.5 of the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 537A.6 New features in Version 1.4 of the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542A.7 New features in Version 1.3 of the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542A.8 New features in Version 1.2 of the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 547A.9 IVM V1.5 content . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 548Abbreviations and acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 549Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553IBM Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 553Other publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554Online resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 554How to get Redbooks publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556Help from IBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 556Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 557
  10. 10. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. ixFigures2-1 Example of virtualization activation codes website . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 372-2 HMC window to activate PowerVM feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 382-3 ASMI menu to enable the Virtualization Engine Technologies . . . . . . . . . 392-4 POWER Hypervisor abstracts physical server hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . 412-5 Virtual processor to physical processor mapping: Pass 1 and Pass 2 . . . 432-6 Micro-Partitioning processor dispatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 442-7 POWER5 physical shared processor pool and micro-partitions . . . . . . . . 582-8 Distribution of processor capacity entitlement on virtual processors . . . . 592-9 Example of capacity distribution of a capped micro-partition . . . . . . . . . . 612-10 Example of capacity distribution of an uncapped micro-partition . . . . . . 622-11 Overview of the architecture of Multiple Shared-Processor Pools . . . . . 632-12 Redistribution of ceded capacity within Shared-Processor Pool1 . . . . . . 662-13 Example of Multiple Shared-Processor Pools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 672-14 POWER6 (or later) server with two Shared-Processor Pools defined . . 702-15 The two levels of unused capacity redistribution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 722-16 Example of a micro-partition moving between Shared-Processor Pools 752-17 Example of a Web-facing deployment using Shared-Processor Pools. . 772-18 Web deployment using Shared-Processor Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 782-19 Capped Shared-Processor Pool offering database services . . . . . . . . . 802-20 Example of a system with Multiple Shared-Processor Pools . . . . . . . . . 822-21 Active Memory Sharing concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 872-22 Active Memory Expansion example partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 892-23 Simple Virtual I/O Server configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 922-24 Virtual I/O Server concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 962-25 Integrated Virtualization Manager configuration on a POWER6 server 1052-26 Basic configuration flow of virtual SCSI resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1122-27 Virtual SCSI architecture overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1142-28 Queue depths and virtual SCSI considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1152-29 Logical Remote Direct Memory Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1172-30 Abstract image of the clustered Virtual I/O Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1212-31 Thin-provisioned devices in the shared storage pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1242-32 Comparing virtual SCSI and NPIV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1292-33 Virtual I/O Server virtual Fibre Channel adapter mappings. . . . . . . . . . 1302-34 Host bus adapter failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1322-35 Host bus adapter and Virtual I/O Server failover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1332-36 Heterogeneous multipathing configuration with NPIV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1352-37 Server using redundant Virtual I/O Server partitions with NPIV . . . . . . 1372-38 Example of VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
  11. 11. x IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration2-39 The VID is placed in the extended Ethernet header . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1502-40 Adapters and interfaces with VLANs (left) and LA (right) . . . . . . . . . . . 1542-41 Flow chart of virtual Ethernet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1572-42 Shared Ethernet Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1602-43 Connection to external network using routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1632-44 VLAN configuration example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1652-45 Adding virtual Ethernet adapters on the Virtual I/O Server for VLANs . 1672-46 Virtual I/O Server SEA comparison with Integrated Virtual Ethernet . . 1702-47 Virtual Ethernet adapter reported on IBM i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1742-48 Page conversion of 520-bytes to 512-bytes sectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1752-49 Virtual SCSI disk unit reported on IBM i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1762-50 NPIV devices reported on IBM i . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1772-51 IBM i multipathing or mirroring for virtual SCSI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1792-52 Single Virtual I/O Server with dual paths to the same disk . . . . . . . . . . 1822-53 Dual Virtual I/O Server accessing the same disk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1832-54 Implementing mirroring at client or server level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1842-55 License boundaries with different processor and pool modes . . . . . . . 1892-56 Licensing requirements for a non-partitioned server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1922-57 Licensing requirements in a micro-partitioned server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1922-58 Physical, virtual, and logical processors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1972-59 SMIT SMT panel with options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2002-60 IBM i processor multi-tasking system value . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2012-61 Reserved Storage Device Pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2082-62 Pool management interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2102-63 Shared Memory Pool and Reserved Storage Device Pool . . . . . . . . . . 2113-1 Virtual I/O Server Config Assist menu. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2183-2 Basic Virtual I/O Server scenario . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2263-3 Hardware Management Console server view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2273-4 HMC Starting the Create Logical Partition wizard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2283-5 HMC Defining the partition ID and partition name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2293-6 HMC Naming the partition profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2303-7 HMC Select whether processors are to be shared or dedicated. . . . . . . 2313-8 HMC Virtual I/O Server processor settings for a micro-partition . . . . . . . 2323-9 HMC Virtual I/O Server memory settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2343-10 HMC Virtual I/O Server physical I/O selection for the partition . . . . . . . 2353-11 HMC start menu for creating virtual adapters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2373-12 HMC Selecting to create a virtual Ethernet adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2383-13 HMC Creating the virtual Ethernet adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2393-14 HMC Creating the virtual SCSI server adapter for the DVD . . . . . . . . . 2403-15 HMC virtual SCSI server adapter for the NIM_server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2413-16 HMC List of created virtual adapters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2423-17 HMC Menu for creating Logical Host Ethernet Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . 2433-18 HMC Menu Optional Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 244
  12. 12. Figures xi3-19 HMC Menu Profile Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2453-20 HMC The created partition VIO_Server1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2463-21 HMC Activating a partition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2483-22 HMC Activate Logical Partition submenu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2493-23 HMC Selecting the SMS menu for startup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2503-24 The SMS startup menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2513-25 Setting TCP/IP parameters using the cfgassist command . . . . . . . . . . 2573-26 Starting the shared storage management HMC dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2653-27 Creating a storage pool using the HMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2663-28 Defining storage pool attributes using the HMC GUI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2673-29 Creating a virtual disk using the HMC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2683-30 SCSI setup for shared optical device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2753-31 IBM i Work with Storage Resources panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2763-32 IBM i Logical Hardware Resources panel I/O debug option . . . . . . . . . 2773-33 IBM i Select IOP Debug Function panel IPL I/O processor option . . . . 2783-34 IBM i Select IOP Debug Function panel Reset I/O processor option . . 2793-35 Virtual Fibre Channel adapter numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2833-36 Dynamically add virtual adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2853-37 Create Fibre Channel server adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2863-38 Set virtual adapter ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2873-39 Save the Virtual I/O Server partition configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2883-40 Change profile to add virtual Fibre Channel client adapter . . . . . . . . . . 2893-41 Create Fibre Channel client adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2903-42 Define virtual adapter ID values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2913-43 Select virtual Fibre Channel client adapter properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2933-44 Virtual Fibre Channel client adapter properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2943-45 IBM i logical hardware resources with NPIV devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2963-46 Creating client logical partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2983-47 Create Partition dialog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2993-48 The start menu for creating virtual adapters window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3003-49 Creating a client Ethernet adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3013-50 Creating the client SCSI disk adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3023-51 Creating the client SCSI DVD adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3023-52 List of created virtual adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3033-53 The Logical Host Ethernet Adapters menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3043-54 IBM i tagged I/O settings dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3053-55 The Optional Settings menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3063-56 The Profile Summary menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3073-57 The list of partitions for the basic setup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3083-58 Backing up the profile definitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3093-59 The edit Managed Profile window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3103-60 Setting the Processor Sharing options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3113-61 Activating the DB_server partition. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313
  13. 13. xii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration3-62 The SMS menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3143-63 Selecting the network adapter for remote IPL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3153-64 IP settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3163-65 Ping test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3173-66 Setting the install device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3183-67 IBM i Select load source device panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3203-68 Edit Virtual Slots in SPT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3263-69 Selecting to work with System Plans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3273-70 Deploying a system plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3283-71 Opening the Deploy System Plan Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3283-72 System plan validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3293-73 Partition Deployment window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3303-74 Operating Environment installation window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3313-75 Customize Operating Environment Install. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3323-76 Modify Install Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3333-77 Summary - Deploy System Plan Wizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3343-78 Confirm Deployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3343-79 Deployment Progress updating automatically. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3353-80 Deployment complete . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3363-81 Basic scenario deployed from the system plan created in SPT . . . . . . 3373-82 Creating an HMC system plan for documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3403-83 Giving a name to the system plan being created . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3413-84 The created system plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3423-85 The back of the server and its installed adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3433-86 Options for the HMC system plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3443-87 Added logical partition using the system plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3463-88 Enabling Active Memory Expansion on the HMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3483-89 Reserved storage device pool management access menu . . . . . . . . . 3513-90 Reserved storage device pool management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3523-91 Reserved storage device list selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3533-92 Reserved storage device selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3543-93 Reserved storage device pool creation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3553-94 Creating a suspend and resume capable partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3573-95 Partition suspend menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3603-96 Validating suspend operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3613-97 Partition successful validation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3613-98 Starting partition suspend operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3623-99 Running partition suspend operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3633-100 Finished partition suspend operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3643-101 Hardware Management Console suspended partition view . . . . . . . . 3653-102 Reserved storage device pool properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3663-103 Partition resume menu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3673-104 Validating resume operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 368
  14. 14. Figures xiii3-105 Successful validation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3683-106 Starting partition resume operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3693-107 Running partition resume operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3703-108 Finished partition resume operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3713-109 Hardware Management Console resume view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3724-1 Redundant Virtual I/O Servers before maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3814-2 Redundant Virtual I/O Servers during maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3824-3 Separating disk and network traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3844-4 Virtual SCSI redundancy using multipathing and mirroring. . . . . . . . . . . 3864-5 MPIO attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3904-6 LVM mirroring with two storage subsystems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3954-7 Basic SEA failover configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3994-8 Alternative configuration for SEA failover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4014-9 Network redundancy using two Virtual I/O Servers and NIB. . . . . . . . . . 4024-10 Link Aggregation (EtherChannel) on the Virtual I/O Server . . . . . . . . . 4074-11 Starting Shared-Processor Pool configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4104-12 Virtual Shared-Processor Pool selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4114-13 Shared-Processor Pool configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4124-14 Virtual Shared-Processor Pool partition tab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4134-15 Shared-Processor Pool partition assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4134-16 Overview of Shared-Processor Pool assignments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4144-17 Supported and best ways to mirror virtual disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4184-18 RAID5 configuration using a RAID adapter on the Virtual I/O Server . . 4194-19 Best way to mirror virtual disks with two Virtual I/O Server. . . . . . . . . . 4214-20 Using MPIO with IBM System Storage DS8000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4234-21 Using MPIO on the Virtual I/O Server with IBM TotalStorage. . . . . . . . 4244-22 Configuration for IBM TotalStorage SAN Volume Controller . . . . . . . . 4254-23 Configuration for multiple Virtual I/O Servers and IBM FAStT . . . . . . . 4264-24 Basic issues for storage of AIX client partitions and PowerHASystemMirror . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4284-25 Example of PowerHA cluster between two AIX client partitions . . . . . . 4305-1 Highly available Shared Ethernet Adapter setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4365-2 Create an IP address on the Shared Ethernet Adapter using cfgassist . 4405-3 NIB configuration on AIX client . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4425-4 VLAN configuration scenario. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4525-5 Virtual Ethernet configuration for the client partition using the HMC. . . . 4535-6 Virtual Ethernet configuration for Virtual I/O Server using the HMC . . . . 4555-7 HMC in a VLAN tagged environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4585-8 Cross-network VLAN tagging with a single HMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4595-9 SAN attachment with multipathing across two Virtual I/O Servers . . . . . 4625-10 IBM i System Service Tools Display disk configuration status . . . . . . . 4775-11 IBM i System Service Tools Display disk unit details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4785-12 IBM i client partition with added virtual SCSI adapter for multipathing . 479
  15. 15. xiv IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration5-13 IBM i SST Display disk configuration status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4825-14 IBM i SST Display disk path status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4835-15 IBM i SST Display disk unit details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4845-16 IBM i CPPEA33 message for a failed disk unit connection. . . . . . . . . . 4855-17 IBM i SST Display disk path status after outage of Virtual I/O Server 1 4865-18 IBM i CPPEA35 message for a restored disk unit connection . . . . . . . 4875-19 IBM i SST Display disk path status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4885-20 Linux client partition using MPIO to access SAN storage . . . . . . . . . . . 4895-21 Redundant Virtual I/O Server client mirroring scenario. . . . . . . . . . . . . 4945-22 VIO_Server2 physical adapter selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4955-23 Virtual SCSI adapters for VIO_Server2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4975-24 IBM i SST Display disk configuration status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5045-25 IBM i SST Display non-configured units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5055-26 IBM i SST Display disk unit details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5065-27 IBM i SST Specify ASPs to add units to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5075-28 IBM i SST Problem Report Unit possibly configured for Power PC AS 5085-29 IBM i SST Confirm Add Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5095-30 IBM i SST Selected units have been added successfully . . . . . . . . . . . 5105-31 IBM i partition restart to DST using a manual IPL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5115-32 IBM i DST Enable remote load source mirroring. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5125-33 IBM i DST Work with mirrored protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5135-34 IBM i DST Select ASP to start mirrored protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5145-35 IBM i DST Problem Report for Virtual disk units in the ASP . . . . . . . . . 5155-36 IBM i DST Virtual disk units in the ASP message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5165-37 IBM i DST Confirm Start Mirrored Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5175-38 IBM i Disk configuration information report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5185-39 IBM i Licensed internal code IPL progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5195-40 IBM i Confirm Add Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5205-41 IBM i resulting mirroring configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5215-42 IBM i CPI0949 message for a failed disk unit connection . . . . . . . . . . . 5225-43 IBM i SST Display disk path status after outage of Virtual I/O Server 1 5235-44 IBM i CPI0988 message for resuming mirrored protection . . . . . . . . . . 5245-45 IBM i SST Display disk configuration status for resuming mirroring . . . 5255-46 IBM i CPI0989 message for resumed mirrored protection . . . . . . . . . . 5265-47 IBM i SST Display disk configuration status after resumed mirroring . . 5275-48 Linux client partition using mirroring with mdadm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5285-49 Linux partitioning layout for mdadm mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 529
  16. 16. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xvTables1-1 PowerVM capabilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31-2 Differences between virtual Ethernet technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81-3 Differences between POWER6 and POWER7 mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171-4 Virtualization features supported by AIX, IBM i and Linux . . . . . . . . . . . . 201-5 Linux support for POWER7 features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221-6 Virtualization features supported by POWER technology levels. . . . . . . . 231-7 Server model to POWER technology level cross-reference . . . . . . . . . . . 242-1 Overview of PowerVM capabilities by edition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322-2 PowerVM feature code overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 392-3 Reasonable settings for shared processor partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 542-4 Entitled capacities for micro-partitions in a Shared-Processor Pool . . . . . 652-5 Attribute values for the default Shared-Processor Pool (SPP0) . . . . . . . . 682-6 AMS and AME comparison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 852-7 Virtual I/O Server sizing examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 932-8 Suggested maximum number of devices per virtual SCSI link . . . . . . . . 1162-9 Virtual SCSI and NPIV comparison. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1412-10 Inter-partition VLAN communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1662-11 VLAN communication to external network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1682-12 Kernel modules for IBM Power Systems virtual devices. . . . . . . . . . . . 1803-1 Network settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2564-1 Main differences between EC and LA aggregation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4054-2 Micro-partition configuration and Shared-Processor Pool assignments . 4084-3 Shared-Processor Pool attributes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4095-1 Virtual Ethernet adapter overview for Virtual I/O Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . 4385-2 Network interface backup configuration examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4435-3 Virtual SCSI adapter configuration for MPIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4645-4 Virtual SCSI adapter configuration for LVM mirroring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
  17. 17. xvi IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration
  18. 18. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xviiNoticesThis information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.IBM may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consultyour local IBM representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area.Any reference to an IBM product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBMproduct, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service thatdoes not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However, it is the usersresponsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM product, program, or service.IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document.The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send licenseinquiries, in writing, to:IBM Director of Licensing, IBM Corporation, North Castle Drive, Armonk, NY 10504-1785 U.S.A.The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other country where suchprovisions are inconsistent with local law: INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATIONPROVIDES THIS PUBLICATION "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS ORIMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT,MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimerof express or implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to you.This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically madeto the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM maymake improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication atany time without notice.Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for convenience only and do not in anymanner serve as an endorsement of those Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of thematerials for this IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.IBM may use or distribute any of the information you supply in any way it believes appropriate withoutincurring any obligation to you.Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled environment. Therefore, the resultsobtained in other operating environments may vary significantly. Some measurements may have been madeon development-level systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the same ongenerally available systems. Furthermore, some measurement may have been estimated throughextrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for theirspecific environment.Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their publishedannouncements or other publicly available sources. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirmthe accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions onthe capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business operations. To illustrate themas completely as possible, the examples include the names of individuals, companies, brands, and products.All of these names are fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual businessenterprise is entirely coincidental.
  19. 19. xviii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationCOPYRIGHT LICENSE:This information contains sample application programs in source language, which illustrate programmingtechniques on various operating platforms. You may copy, modify, and distribute these sample programs inany form without payment to IBM, for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing applicationprograms conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for which thesample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly tested under all conditions. IBM,therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.TrademarksIBM, the IBM logo, and ibm.com are trademarks or registered trademarks of International BusinessMachines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. These and other IBM trademarkedterms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol (® or ™),indicating US registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information waspublished. Such trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A currentlist of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtmlThe following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,other countries, or both:Active Memory™AIX 5L™AIX®BladeCenter®DB2®developerWorks®DS4000®DS6000™DS8000®EnergyScale™Enterprise Storage Server®eServer™GDPS®Geographically DispersedParallel Sysplex™GPFS™HACMP™i5/OS®IBM®iSeries®Micro-Partitioning™OS/400®Parallel Sysplex®Passport Advantage®Power Architecture®POWER Hypervisor™Power Systems™POWER3™POWER4™POWER5™POWER6+™POWER6®POWER7™POWER7 Systems™PowerHA™PowerVM™POWER®pSeries®Redbooks®Redpaper™Redbooks (logo) ®System i®System p5®System p®System Storage®System z®Systems Director VMControl™Tivoli®TotalStorage®XIV®The following terms are trademarks of other companies:Windows, and the Windows logo are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, othercountries, or both.Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside logo, and Intel Centrino logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of IntelCorporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both.Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.
  20. 20. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xixPrefaceThis IBM® Redbooks® publication provides an introduction to PowerVM™virtualization technologies on Power System servers.PowerVM is a combination of hardware, firmware, and software that providesCPU, network, and disk virtualization. These are the main virtualizationtechnologies:POWER7, POWER6™, and POWER5™ hardwarePOWER Hypervisor™Virtual I/O ServerThough the PowerVM brand includes partitioning, management software, andother offerings, this publication focuses on the virtualization technologies that arepart of the PowerVM Standard and Enterprise Editions.This publication is also designed to be an introduction guide for systemadministrators, providing instructions for these tasks:Configuration and creation of partitions and resources on the HMCInstallation and configuration of the Virtual I/O ServerCreation and installation of virtualized partitionsExamples using AIX, IBM i, and LinuxThis edition has been updated with the new features available with the IBMPOWER7 hardware and firmware.The team who wrote this bookThis book was produced by a team of specialists from around the world workingat the International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center.Stuart Devenish is an IT Specialist from Brisbane, Australia. He is currentlyworking for Suncorp as the Team Leader of Midrange Systems. His team isresponsible for the design, implementation, and support of UNIX and Linuxbased hosting platforms for all brands of the company. For the last few years hehas spent most of his time merging Power installations, consolidating datacenters, and implementing iSCSI/NFS storage configurations. He has ten yearsof experience in UNIX/Linux and holds a degree in Information Technology fromCentral Queensland University. His areas of expertise include AIX, PowerVM,TCP/IP, and Perl.
  21. 21. xx IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationIngo Dimmer is an IBM Consulting IT Specialist for IBM i and a PMI ProjectManagement Professional working in the IBM STG ATS Europe storage supportorganization in Mainz, Germany. He has eleven years of experience in enterprisestorage support from working in IBM post-sales and pre-sales support. He holdsa degree in Electrical Engineering from the Gerhard-Mercator UniversityDuisburg. His areas of expertise include IBM i external disk and tape storagesolutions, PowerVM virtualization, I/O performance and high availability for whichhe has been an author of several white papers and IBM Redbooks publications.Rafael Folco has been working at IBM Brazil for five years as a SoftwareEngineer for the IBM STG Linux Technology Center in Hortolandia, Brazil. Heholds a bachelors degree in Computer Engineering from the PontificiaUniversidade Catolica and a postgraduate degree in Software Engineering fromUniversidade Metodista de Piracicaba. He has five years of experience in IBMPower systems and seven years of experience in Linux development and testing.His areas of expertise include Linux on Power development and testing, Python,C/C++, and PowerVM.Mark Roy is an IBM i Specialist based in Melbourne, Australia. He waspreviously with a large Australian bank, designing, installing, and enhancing theirIBM i (previously branded as CPF, OS/400®, and i5/OS®) environment. Markhas authored several IBM Redbooks publications, covering topics such as IBM itechnical overviews, IBM i problem determination, IBM i performancemanagement, and IBM PowerVM. He recently established Sysarb, a companyproviding freelance consulting and contracting services to IBM i customers andservice providers. He specializes in IBM i and Power Systems infrastructurearchitecture, technical support, and performance and systems management.Mark can be contacted at Mark.Roy@sysarb.com.au.Stephane Saleur is an IT Specialist working for IBM France in the IntegratedTechnology Delivery division in La Gaude. He has 15 years of experience in theInformation Technology field. His areas of expertise include AIX, PowerVM,PowerHA, Power Systems, Storage Area Network and IBM System Storage. Heis an IBM @server Certified Systems Expert - pSeries HACMP for AIX 5L andIBM @server Certified Advanced Technical Expert - pSeries and AIX 5L.Oliver Stadler is a Senior IT Specialist working in Integrated TechnologyDelivery in IBM Switzerland. He has 21 years of experience in the IT-industry. Inhis current job he is responsible for the architecture, design, and implementationof IBM Power Systems and AIX based solutions for IBM strategic outsourcingcustomers. He has written extensively on PowerVM virtualization for IBM PowerSystems.
  22. 22. Preface xxiNaoya Takizawa is an IT Specialist for Power Systems and AIX in IBM JapanSystems Engineering that provides a part of the ATS function in Japan. He hasfive years of experience in AIX and PowerVM field. He holds a Master of Sciencedegree in Theoretical Physics from Tokyo Institute of Technology and SophiaUniversity. His areas of expertise include Power Systems, PowerVM, AIX andPowerHA SystemMirror for AIX. He also has experience in IBM System Storage.The project that produced this publication was managed by:Scott Vetter, PMP. Scott is a Certified Executive Project Manager at theInternational Technical Support Organization, Austin Center. He has enjoyed 26years of rich and diverse experience working for IBM in a variety of challengingroles. His latest efforts are directed at providing world-class Power SystemsRedbooks publications, white papers, and workshop collateral.Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:John Banchy, Bob Battista, Gail Belli, Bruno Blanchard, Ralph Baumann,Shaival Chokshi, Herman Dierks, Arpana Durgaprasad, Nathan Fontenot,Chris Francois, Veena Ganti, Ron Gordon, Eric Haase, Robert Jennings,Yessong Brandon JohngBrian King, Bob Kovacs, Monica Lemay, Chris Liebl,Naresh Nayar, Terrence Nixa, Jorge Nogueras, Jim Pafumi, Amartey Pearson,Scott Prather, Michael Reed, Sergio Reyes, Jeffrey Scheel, Naoya Takizawa,Richard Wale, Robert Wallis, Duane Wenzel, Kristopher Whitney, Michael Wolf,Joseph Writz, Laura ZaborowskiIBM USNigel Griffiths, Sam Moseley, Dai WilliamsIBM UKJoergen BergIBM DenmarkBruno BlanchardIBM FranceAuthors of the first edition, Advanced POWER Virtualization on IBM eServerp5 Servers: Introduction and Basic Configuration, published in October 2004,were:Bill Adra, Annika Blank, Mariusz Gieparda, Joachim Haust,Oliver Stadler, Doug SzerdiAuthors of the second edition, Advanced POWER Virtualization on IBMSystem p5, December 2005, were:Annika Blank, Paul Kiefer, Carlos Sallave Jr., Gerardo Valencia,Jez Wain, Armin M. Warda
  23. 23. xxii IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationAuthors of the third edition, Advanced POWER Virtualization on IBM Systemp5: Introduction and Configuration, February 2007, were:Morten Vågmo, Peter WüstefeldAuthors of the fourth edition, PowerVM Virtualization on IBM System p:Introduction and Configuration, May 2008, were:Christopher Hales, Chris Milsted, Oliver Stadler, Morten VågmoNow you can become a published author, too!Heres an opportunity to spotlight your skills, grow your career, and become apublished author—all at the same time! Join an ITSO residency project and helpwrite a book in your area of expertise, while honing your experience usingleading-edge technologies. Your efforts will help to increase product acceptanceand customer satisfaction, as you expand your network of technical contacts andrelationships. Residencies run from two to six weeks in length, and you canparticipate either in person or as a remote resident working from your homebase.Find out more about the residency program, browse the residency index, andapply online at:ibm.com/redbooks/residencies.htmlComments welcomeYour comments are important to us!We want our books to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments aboutthis book or other IBM Redbooks publications in one of the following ways:Use the online Contact us review Redbooks form found at:ibm.com/redbooksSend your comments in an email to:redbooks@us.ibm.comMail your comments to:IBM Corporation, International Technical Support OrganizationDept. HYTD Mail Station P0992455 South RoadPoughkeepsie, NY 12601-5400
  24. 24. Preface xxiiiStay connected to IBM RedbooksFind us on Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/IBMRedbooksFollow us on Twitter:http://twitter.com/ibmredbooksLook for us on LinkedIn:http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=2130806Explore new Redbooks publications, residencies, and workshops with theIBM Redbooks weekly newsletter:https://www.redbooks.ibm.com/Redbooks.nsf/subscribe?OpenFormStay current on recent Redbooks publications with RSS Feeds:http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/rss.html
  25. 25. xxiv IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration
  26. 26. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. xxvSummary of changesThis section describes the technical changes made in this edition of the book andin previous editions. This edition might also include minor corrections andeditorial changes that are not identified.Summary of Changesfor SG24-7940-04for IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configurationas created or updated on June 12, 2012.June 2011, Fifth EditionThis revision reflects the addition, deletion, or modification of new and changedinformation described here.New informationCapabilities provided by Virtual I/O Server Version 2, Release 2, Fixpack 10,Service Pack 1, including these:– Virtual I/O Server Clustering, see “Virtual I/O Server storage clusteringmodel” on page 120– Shared Storage Pools, see 2.7.2, “Shared Storage Pools” on page 118– Thin provisioning, see “Thin provisioning” on page 122– Support for Peer to Peer Remote Copy, see “Peer to Peer Remote Copy”on page 98Major updates to the Virtual Ethernet sections, including these:– Support for multiple virtual switches, see “Multiple virtual switches” onpage 157– Performance considerations, see 2.10.7, “Performance considerations” onpage 171Suspend and Resume, see 2.16, “Partition Suspend and Resume” onpage 205In a number of sections, significant IBM i content has been added.In a number of sections, significant Linux content has been added.IBM License Metric Tool, see 2.13.7, “IBM License Metric Tool” on page 193
  27. 27. xxvi IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationChanged informationSections describing the concepts and setup of NPIV have been moved fromthe Redbooks publication, PowerVM Virtualization Managing and Monitoring,SG24-7590.The virtual memory section has been extended to include these:– Active Memory Expansion, see 1.3.3, “Active Memory Expansion” onpage 17– Active Memory Sharing, see 1.2.11, “Active Memory Sharing” on page 14Several sections have been updated to include POWER7 based offerings.Several sections have been updated to include new supported hardware suchas USB tape or USB Blu-ray devices.Several sections have been updated to include Virtual Tape.
  28. 28. © Copyright IBM Corp. 2010-2011. All rights reserved. 1Chapter 1. IntroductionBusinesses are turning to PowerVM virtualization to consolidate multipleworkloads onto fewer systems, increasing server utilization, and reducing cost.Power VM technology provides a secure and scalable virtualization environmentfor AIX, IBM i, and Linux applications, built upon the advanced reliability,availability, and serviceability features and the leading performance of the PowerSystems platform.This book targets clients new to virtualization as well as more experiencedvirtualization professionals. It is split into five chapters, each with a differenttarget audience in mind.Chapter 1 provides a short overview of the key virtualization technologies. Anunderstanding of this chapter is required for the remainder of the book.Chapter 2 is a slightly more in-depth discussion of the technology aimed more atthe estate-architect or project-architect for deployments.Chapters 3, 4, and 5 are aimed at professionals who are deploying thetechnology. Chapter 3 works through a simple scenario and Chapter 4 introducesmore advanced topics such as virtual storage and virtual network redundancy.Chapter 5 expands on some of the introduced topics by providing workedconfiguration examples.1
  29. 29. 2 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.1 The value of virtualization on Power SystemsAs you look for ways to maximize the return on your IT infrastructureinvestments, consolidating workloads becomes an attractive proposition.IBM Power Systems combined with PowerVM technology are designed to helpyou consolidate and simplify your IT environment. Key capabilities include these:Improve server utilization and sharing I/O resources to reduce total cost ofownership and make better use of IT assets.Improve business responsiveness and operational speed by dynamicallyre-allocating resources to applications as needed — to better match changingbusiness needs or handle unexpected changes in demand.Simplify IT infrastructure management by making workloads independent ofhardware resources, thereby enabling you to make business-driven policies todeliver resources based on time, cost and service-level requirements.This chapter discusses the virtualization technologies and features on IBMPower Systems.1.2 PowerVMPowerVM is the industry-leading virtualization solution for AIX, IBM i, and Linuxenvironments on IBM POWER technology. PowerVM offers a securevirtualization environment, built on the advanced RAS features and leadershipperformance of the Power Systems platform. It features leading technologiessuch as Power Hypervisor, Micro-Partitioning, Dynamic Logical Partitioning,Shared Processor Pools, Shared Storage Pools, Integrated VirtualizationManager, PowerVM Lx86, Live Partition Mobility, Active Memory Sharing, N_PortID Virtualization, and Suspend/Resume. PowerVM is a combination of hardwareenablement and value-added software. In 1.2.1, “PowerVM editions” on page 2we discuss the licensed features of each of the three different editions ofPowerVM.1.2.1 PowerVM editionsThis section provides information about the virtualization capabilities ofPowerVM. There are three versions of PowerVM, suited for various purposes:PowerVM Express Edition:PowerVM Express Edition is designed for customers looking for anintroduction to more advanced virtualization features at a highly affordableprice.
  30. 30. Chapter 1. Introduction 3PowerVM Standard Edition:PowerVM Standard Edition provides advanced virtualization functionality forAIX, IBM i, and Linux operating systems. PowerVM Standard Edition issupported on all POWER processor-based servers and includes featuresdesigned to allow businesses to increase system utilization.PowerVM Enterprise Edition:PowerVM Enterprise Edition includes all the features of PowerVM StandardEdition plus two new industry-leading capabilities called Active MemorySharing and Live Partition Mobility. It provides the most completevirtualization for AIX, IBM i, and Linux operating systems in the industry.It is possible to upgrade from the Standard Edition to the Enterprise Edition.Table 1-1 outlines the functional elements of the available PowerVM editions.Table 1-1 PowerVM capabilitiesPowerVM editions Express Standard EnterprisePowerVM Hypervisor Yes Yes YesDynamic Logical Partitioning Yes Yes YesMaximum partitions 3 per server 254 per server 254 per serverManagement VM Control, IVM VM Control, IVM, HMC VM Control, IVM, HMCVirtual I/O Server Yes Yes (Dual) Yes (Dual)Integrated Virtualization Manager Yes Yes YesPowerVM Lx86 Yes Yes YesSuspend/Resume No Yes YesN_Port ID Virtualization Yes Yes YesMultiple Shared Processor Pool No Yes YesShared Storage Pools No Yes YesThin Provisioning No Yes YesActive Memory Sharing No No YesLive Partition Mobility No No Yes
  31. 31. 4 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.2.2 Logical partitionsLogical partitions (LPARs) and virtualization increase utilization of systemresources and add a new level of configuration possibilities. This sectionprovides details and configuration specifications for these topics.Dynamic logical partitioningLogical partitioning (LPAR) was introduced for IBM POWER servers with the IBMPOWER4 processor-based product line and the IBM OS/400 V4R4 operatingsystem. This technology offered the capability to divide a POWER offering intoseparate logical systems, allowing each LPAR to run an operating environmenton dedicated attached devices, such as processors, memory, and I/Ocomponents.Later, dynamic logical partitioning (DLPAR) increased the flexibility, allowingselected system resources, such as processors, memory, and I/O components,to be added and deleted from logical partitions while they are executing. Theability to reconfigure dynamic LPARs encourages system administrators todynamically redefine all available system resources to reach the optimumcapacity for each defined dynamic LPAR.For more information about dynamic logical partitioning, see 2.15, “Dynamicresources” on page 203.Micro-PartitioningMicro-Partitioning technology allows you to allocate fractions of processors to alogical partition. A logical partition using fractions of processors is also known asa Shared Processor Partition or Micro-Partition. Micro-Partitions run over a set ofprocessors called a Shared Processor Pool.Virtual processors are used to let the operating system manage the fractions ofprocessing power assigned to the logical partition. From an operating systemperspective, a virtual processor cannot be distinguished from a physicalprocessor, unless the operating system has been enhanced to be made aware ofthe difference. Physical processors are abstracted into virtual processors that areavailable to partitions. The meaning of the term physical processor in this sectionis a processor core. For example, in a 2-core server there are two physicalprocessors.For more information about Micro-Partitioning, see 2.3, “Overview ofMicro-Partitioning technologies” on page 48.
  32. 32. Chapter 1. Introduction 5Processing modeWhen you create a logical partition, you can assign entire processors fordedicated use, or you can assign partial processor units from a shared processorpool.Dedicated modeIn dedicated mode, physical processors are assigned as a whole to partitions.The simultaneous multithreading feature in the POWER technology allows thecore to execute instructions from two or four independent software threadssimultaneously. To support this feature, we use the concept of logical processors.The operating system (AIX, IBM i, or Linux) sees one physical processor as twoor four logical processors if the simultaneous multithreading feature is on. Ifsimultaneous multithreading is off, then each physical processor is presented asone logical processor and thus only one thread.Shared dedicated modeOn POWER technology, you can configure dedicated partitions to becomeprocessor donors for idle processors they own. Allowing for the donation of spareCPU cycles from dedicated processor partitions to a Shared Processor Pool. Thededicated partition maintains absolute priority for dedicated CPU cycles.Enabling this feature can help to increase system utilization, withoutcompromising the computing power for critical workloads in a dedicatedprocessor.Shared modeIn shared mode, logical partitions use virtual processors to access fractions ofphysical processors. Shared partitions can define any number of virtualprocessors (the maximum number is 10 times the number of processing unitsassigned to the partition). From the POWER Hypervisor point of view, virtualprocessors represent dispatching objects. The POWER Hypervisor dispatchesvirtual processors to physical processors according to the partition’s processingunits entitlement.One Processing Unit represents one physical processor’s processing capacity. Atthe end of the POWER Hypervisor’s dispatch cycle (10 ms), all partitions mustreceive total CPU time equal to their processing units entitlement. The logicalprocessors are defined on top of virtual processors. So, even with a virtualprocessor, the concept of a logical processor exists and the number of logicalprocessors depends on whether the simultaneous multithreading is turned on oroff.For more information about processing modes, see 2.3, “Overview ofMicro-Partitioning technologies” on page 48.
  33. 33. 6 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.2.3 Virtual I/O ServerAs part of PowerVM, the Virtual I/O Server is a software appliance with whichyou can associate physical resources and that allows you to share theseresources among multiple client logical partitions. The Virtual I/O Server can useboth virtualized storage and network adapters, making use of the virtual SCSIand virtual Ethernet facilities.For storage virtualization, these backing devices can be used:Direct-attached entire disks from the Virtual I/O ServerSAN disks attached to the Virtual I/O ServerLogical volumes defined on either of the aforementioned disksFile-backed storage, with the files residing on either of the aforementioneddisksLogical units from shared storage poolsOptical storage devices.Tape storage devicesFor virtual Ethernet we can define Shared Ethernet Adapters on the Virtual I/OServer, bridging network traffic between the server internal virtual Ethernetnetworks and external physical Ethernet networks.The Virtual I/O Server technology facilitates the consolidation of LAN and diskI/O resources and minimizes the number of physical adapters that are required,while meeting the non-functional requirements of the server.The Virtual I/O Server can run in either a dedicated processor partition or amicro-partition. The different configurations for the Virtual I/O Server andassociated I/O subsystems can be seen in Advanced POWER Virtualization onIBM System p Virtual I/O Server Deployment Examples, REDP-4224.For more information about Virtual I/O Server, see 2.5, “Virtual I/O Server” onpage 91.
  34. 34. Chapter 1. Introduction 71.2.4 I/O VirtualizationCombined with features designed into the POWER processors, the POWERHypervisor delivers functions that enable other system technologies, includinglogical partitioning technology, virtualized processors, IEEE VLAN compatiblevirtual switch, virtual SCSI adapters, virtual Fibre Channel adapters and virtualconsoles. The POWER Hypervisor is a basic component of the system’sfirmware and offers the following functions:Provides an abstraction between the physical hardware resources and thelogical partitions that use themEnforces partition integrity by providing a security layer between logicalpartitionsControls the dispatch of virtual processors to physical processors (see“Processing mode” on page 5)Saves and restores all processor state information during a logical processorcontext switchControls hardware I/O interrupt management facilities for logical partitionsProvides virtual LAN channels between logical partitions that help to reducethe need for physical Ethernet adapters for inter-partition communicationMonitors the Service Processor and will perform a reset/reload if it detects theloss of the Service Processor, notifying the operating system if the problem isnot correctedThe POWER Hypervisor is always active, regardless of the system configurationand also when not connected to the HMC. The POWER Hypervisor provides thefollowing types of virtual I/O adapters:Virtual SCSIVirtual EthernetVirtual Fibre ChannelVirtual consoleVirtual SCSIThe POWER Hypervisor provides a virtual SCSI mechanism for virtualization ofstorage devices. The storage virtualization is accomplished using two, paired,adapters: a virtual SCSI server adapter and a virtual SCSI client adapter. AVirtual I/O Server partition or an IBM i partition can define virtual SCSI serveradapters, AIX, Linux, and other IBM i partitions, can then be client partitions. TheVirtual I/O Server partition is a special logical partition. The Virtual I/O Serversoftware is available with the optional PowerVM Edition features. Virtual SCSIcan be used for virtual disk, virtual tape (virtual tape support allows serial sharingof selected SAS and USB tape devices), and virtual optical devices.
  35. 35. 8 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationVirtual Ethernet technologiesVirtualizing Ethernet on a Power System offering can be accomplished usingdifferent technologies. Table 1-2 provides an overview of the differences betweenthe virtual Ethernet technologies.Table 1-2 Differences between virtual Ethernet technologiesVirtual EthernetThe POWER Hypervisor provides a virtual Ethernet switch function that allowspartitions on the same server to use a fast and secure communication withoutany need for physical interconnection. The virtual Ethernet allows varioustransmission speeds depending on the MTU size, starting at 1 Gbps. dependingon the maximum transmission unit (MTU) size and CPU entitlement. The virtualEthernet is part of the base system configuration and does not require Virtual I/OServer.Virtual Ethernet has the following major features:The virtual Ethernet adapters can be used for both IPv4 and IPv6.The POWER Hypervisor presents itself to partitions as a virtual 802.1Qcompliant switch.Virtual consoleEach partition needs to have access to a system console. Tasks such asoperating system installation, network setup, and some problem analysisactivities require a dedicated system console.For AIX and Linux, the POWER Hypervisor provides the virtual console using avirtual TTY or serial adapter and a set of Hypervisor calls to operate on them.Virtual TTY does not require the purchase of any additional features or softwaresuch as the PowerVM Edition features.Feature Virtual Ethernet Shared EthernetAdapterIntegrated VirtualEthernetAllowsinterpartitionconnectivity withina serverYes No Yes, howeverconnectivity mustbe through theexternal networkAllows partitionconnectivity tophysical networkNo Yes YesVirtual I/O Serverrequired?No Yes No
  36. 36. Chapter 1. Introduction 9Depending on the system configuration, the operating system console can beprovided by the Hardware Management Console virtual TTY, IVM virtual TTY, orfrom a terminal emulator that is connected to a system port.For IBM i, an HMC managed server can use the 5250 system console emulationthat is provided by a Hardware Management Console, or use an IBM i AccessOperations Console. IVM managed servers must use an IBM i AccessOperations Console.For more information about I/O virtualization, see Chapter 2, “Virtualizationtechnologies on IBM Power Systems” on page 31.1.2.5 Integrated Virtualization ManagerIntegrated Virtualization Manager (IVM) is a management tool that combinespartition management and Virtual I/O Server (VIOS) functionality into a singlepartition running on the system. The IVM features an easy-to-use point-and-clickinterface and is supported on blades and entry-level to mid-range servers. Usingthe IVM helps lower the cost of entry to PowerVM virtualization because it doesnot require a Hardware Management Console.For more information about the Integrated Virtualization Manager, see 2.6,“Integrated Virtualization Manager” on page 103.1.2.6 PowerVM Lx86PowerVM Lx86 supports the installation and running of most 32-bit x86 Linuxapplications on any POWER5 (or later) offering, or IBM Power Architecturetechnology-based blade servers. PowerVM Lx86 creates a virtual x86environment, within which the Linux on Intel applications can run. Currently, avirtual PowerVM Lx86 environment supports SUSE Linux or Red Hat Linux x86distributions. The translator and the virtual environment run strictly within userspace.No modifications to the POWER kernel are required. PowerVM Lx86 does notrun the x86 kernel on the POWER system and is not a virtual machine. Instead,x86 applications are encapsulated so that the operating environment appears tobe Linux on x86, even though the underlying system is a Linux on POWERsystem.Support: RHEL5 only supports POWER7 processor-based servers inPOWER6 Compatibility Mode. Customers will need to use SLES11 to take fulladvantage of the POWER7 technology.
  37. 37. 10 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationFor more information about PowerVM Lx86, see the following website:http://www-947.ibm.com/support/entry/portal/Downloads/Software/Other_Software/PowerVM_Lx86_for_x86_Linux1.2.7 Virtual Fibre ChannelN_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) is an industry-standard technology that allows anNPIV capable Fibre Channel adapter to be configured with multiple virtualworld-wide port names (WWPNs). Similar to the virtual SCSI functionality, NPIVis another way of securely sharing a physical Fibre Channel adapter amongmultiple Virtual I/O Server client partitions.From an architectural perspective, the key difference with NPIV compared tovirtual SCSI is that the Virtual I/O Server does not act as a SCSI emulator to itsclient partitions but as a direct Fibre Channel pass-through for the Fibre ChannelProtocol I/O traffic through the POWER Hypervisor. Instead of generic SCSIdevices presented to the client partitions with virtual SCSI, with NPIV, the clientpartitions are presented with native access to the physical SCSI target devices ofSAN disk or tape storage systems.The benefit with NPIV is that the physical target device characteristics such asvendor or model information remain fully visible to the Virtual I/O Server clientpartition, so that device drivers such as multipathing software, middleware suchas copy services, or storage management applications that rely on the physicaldevice characteristics do not need to be changed.Virtual Fibre Channel can be used for virtual disk and/or virtual tape.1.2.8 Partition Suspend and ResumeThe Virtual I/O Server provides Partition Suspend and Resume capability toclient logical partitions within the IBM POWER7 systems. Suspend/Resumeoperations allow the partition’s state to be suspended and resumed at a latertime.A suspended logical partition indicates that it is in standby/hibernated state, andall of its resources can be used by other partitions. On the other hand, a resumedlogical partition means that the partition’s state has been successfully restoredfrom a suspend operation. A partition’s state is stored in a paging space on apersistent storage device.The Suspend/Resume feature has been built on existing Logical PartitionMobility (LPM) and Active Memory Sharing (AMS) architecture, and it requiresPowerVM Standard Edition.
  38. 38. Chapter 1. Introduction 11Suspend capable partitions are available on POWER7 Systems and support theAIX operating system. For more details about supported hardware and operatingsystems, see Table 1-6 on page 23 and Table 1-4 on page 20.The applicability and benefits of the Suspend/Resume feature include resourcebalancing and planned CEC outages for maintenance or upgrades. Lower priorityand/or long running workloads can be suspended to free resources. This isuseful for performance and energy management.Suspend/Resume can be used in place of or in conjunction with Partition Mobility,and might require less time and effort than a manual database shutdown/restart.A typical scenario in which the Suspend/Resume capability is valuable is thecase where a partition with a long running application can be suspended to allowfor maintenance or upgrades and then resumed afterwards.The availability requirements of the application might be such that configuring thepartition for Partition Mobility is not warranted. However, the application does notprovide its own periodic checkpoint capability, and shutting it down meansrestarting it from the beginning at a later time.The ability to suspend processing for the partition, save its state safely, free upthe system for whatever activities are required, and then resume it later, can bevery valuable in this scenario.Another example is the case where a partition is running applications that require1-2 hours to safely shut them all down before taking the partition down for systemmaintenance and another 1-2 hours to bring them back up to steady stateoperation after the maintenance window.Partition migration can be used to mitigate this scenario as well, but might requireresources that are not available on another server. The ability toSuspend/Resume the partition in less time will save hours of administrator timein shutdown and startup activities during planned outage windows.For more information about Suspend/Resume, see 2.16, “Partition Suspend andResume” on page 205.Requirements: Suspend/Resume requires PowerVM Standard Edition (SE).However, when used in conjunction with Partition Mobility, it requires PowerVMEnterprise Edition (EE).
  39. 39. 12 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and ConfigurationShared Ethernet AdapterThe Shared Ethernet Adapter (SEA) is a feature of the Virtual I/O server thatenables a Virtual I/O server to bridge Ethernet frames between a physicaladapter and the POWER Hypervisor switch. This allows multiple partitions tosimultaneously access an external network through the physical adapter. AShared Ethernet Adapter can be configured for High Availability (HA) by pairing itwith a Shared Ethernet Adapter on a second Virtual I/O server.Integrated Virtual EthernetIntegrated Virtual Ethernet (IVE) is the collective name referring to a number ofPOWER 6 (or later) technologies that provide high-speed Ethernet adapter ports,by a physical Host Ethernet Adapter (HEA), which can be shared betweenmultiple partitions. This technology does not require Virtual I/O server.1.2.9 Shared storage poolsWith Virtual I/O Server version 2.2.0.11 Fix Pack 11 Service Pack 1, sharedstorage pools are introduced. A shared storage pool is a server based storagevirtualization that is clustered and is an extension of existing storagevirtualization on the Virtual I/O Server.Shared storage pools can simplify the aggregation of large numbers of disks.They also allow better utilization of the available storage by using thinprovisioning. The thinly provisioned device is not fully backed by physical storageif the data block is not in actual use.Shared storage pools provide a simple administration for storage management.After the physical volumes are allocated to a Virtual I/O Server in the sharedstorage pool environment, the physical volume management tasks, such as acapacity management or an allocation of the volumes to a client partition, areperformed by the Virtual I/O Server.The shared storage pool is supported on the Virtual I/O Server Version 2.2.0.11,Fix Pack 24, Service Pack 1, or later.For more information about shared storage pools, see 2.7.2, “Shared StoragePools” on page 118.Cluster: At the time of writing, a cluster can only contain one Virtual I/OServer node.
  40. 40. Chapter 1. Introduction 131.2.10 Multiple Shared-Processor PoolsMultiple Shared-Processor Pools (MSPPs) is a capability supported on POWER6(or later) technology. This capability allows a system administrator to create a setof micro-partitions with the purpose of controlling the processor capacity that canbe consumed from the physical shared-processor pool.To implement MSPPs, there is a set of underlying techniques and technologies.Micro-partitions are created and then identified as members of either the defaultShared-Processor Pool0 or a user-defined Shared-Processor Pooln. The virtualprocessors that exist within the set of micro-partitions are monitored by thePOWER Hypervisor and processor capacity is managed according touser-defined attributes.If the Power Systems server is under heavy load, each micro-partition within aShared-Processor Pool is guaranteed its processor entitlement plus any capacitythat it can be allocated from the Reserved Pool Capacity if the micro-partition isuncapped.If certain micro-partitions in a Shared-Processor Pool do not use their capacityentitlement, the unused capacity is ceded and other uncapped micro-partitionswithin the same Shared-Processor Pool are allocated the additional capacityaccording to their uncapped weighting. In this way, the Entitled Pool Capacity of aShared-Processor Pool is distributed to the set of micro-partitions within thatShared-Processor Pool.All Power Systems servers that support the Multiple Shared-Processor Poolscapability will have a minimum of one (the default) Shared-Processor Pool andup to a maximum of 64 Shared-Processor Pools.Multiple Shared-Processor Pools can also be useful for software licensemanagement where sub-capacity licensing is involved. MultipleShared-Processor Pools can be used to isolate workloads in a pool and thus notexceed an upper CPU limit.For more information about sub-capacity licensing, see 2.13.5, “Sub-capacitylicensing for IBM software” on page 191.For more information about Multiple Shared-Processor Pools, see 2.3, “Overviewof Micro-Partitioning technologies” on page 48.
  41. 41. 14 IBM PowerVM Virtualization Introduction and Configuration1.2.11 Active Memory SharingActive Memory Sharing is an IBM PowerVM advanced memory virtualizationtechnology that provides system memory virtualization capabilities to IBM PowerSystems, allowing multiple partitions to share a common pool of physicalmemory. Active Memory Sharing is only available with the PowerVM Enterpriseedition.The physical memory of a IBM Power System server can be assigned to multiplepartitions either in a dedicated mode or a shared mode. The systemadministrator has the capability to assign part of the physical memory to apartition and other physical memory to a pool that is shared by other partitions.A single partition can have either dedicated or shared memory.With a pure dedicated memory model, it is the system administrator’s task tooptimize available memory distribution among partitions. When a partition suffersdegradation due to memory constraints and other partitions have unusedmemory, the administrator can react manually by issuing a dynamic memoryreconfiguration.With a shared memory model, it is the system that automatically decides theoptimal distribution of the physical memory to partitions and adjusts the memoryassignment based on partition load. The administrator reserves physical memoryfor the shared memory pool, assigns partitions to the pool, and provides accesslimits to the pool.Active Memory Sharing can be exploited to increase memory utilization on thesystem either by decreasing the global memory requirement or by allowing thecreation of additional partitions on an existing system. Active Memory Sharingcan be used in parallel with Active Memory Expansion on a system running amixed workload of various operating systems.For example, AIX partitions can take advantage of Active Memory Expansionwhile other operating systems take advantage of Active Memory Sharing.For additional information regarding Active Memory Sharing, see PowerVMVirtualization Active Memory Sharing, REDP-4470.Also see 2.4.1, “Active Memory Sharing” on page 86.
  42. 42. Chapter 1. Introduction 151.2.12 PowerVM Live Partition MobilityPowerVM Live Partition Mobility allows you to move a running logical partition,including its operating system and running applications, from one system toanother without any shutdown or without disrupting the operation of that logicalpartition. Inactive partition mobility allows you to move a powered off logicalpartition from one system to another.Partition mobility provides systems management flexibility and improves systemavailability, as follows:Avoid planned outages for hardware or firmware maintenance by movinglogical partitions to another server and then performing the maintenance. LivePartition Mobility can help lead to zero downtime maintenance because youcan use it to work around scheduled maintenance activities.Avoid downtime for a server upgrade by moving logical partitions to anotherserver and then performing the upgrade. This allows your end users tocontinue their work without disruption.Perform preventive failure management: If a server indicates a potentialfailure, you can move its logical partitions to another server before the failureoccurs. Partition mobility can help avoid unplanned downtime.Optimize server workloads:– Workload consolidation: You can consolidate workloads running onseveral small, under-utilized servers onto a single large server.– Flexible workload management: You can move workloads from server toserver to optimize resource use and workload performance within yourcomputing environment. With active partition mobility, you can manageworkloads with minimal downtime.Use Live Partition Mobility for a migration from POWER6 to POWER7processor-based servers without any downtime of your applications.Using IBM Systems Director VMControl’s system pool function, virtual serverrelocation using LPM can be automated, based on user defined policies orevent triggers.For more information about Live Partition Mobility, see the IBM Redbookspublication, IBM PowerVM Live Partition Mobility, SG24-7460.

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