IBM BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

IBM BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud

on

  • 800 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
800
Views on SlideShare
800
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

IBM BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud IBM BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud Document Transcript

  •   IBM BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud  By Anne MacFarland Virtualization is a boon to technology’s effectiveness.  Virtualize servers and you can safely use them for more applications.  Virtualize storage and you can get higher utilization and streamlined operations management.  Virtualize networks and application performance improves.  Virtualize I/O and you can replace elements without interrupting data center operations.  Virtualize them all and you can change your mode of data center operation to one that is simpler, less expensive (CAPEX and OPEX), and uses far fewer cables and less space. Many businesses are looking for this kind of comprehensively virtualized x86 environment (storage, networks, servers) pre‐loaded with core applications such as MS Windows, VMware ESX, and management elements. They want good performance at a great price with less complex but fully comprehensive operational management.  They want heightened density in order to reduce the size (and cost) of their data center footprints.  Generated heat can be dealt with in a more focused (and expeditious) way. There is also less latency between compute elements, which benefits many core business applications. The IBM BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud, a data‐center‐in‐a‐box (well, actually, in a BladeCenter cabinet) is just such a system.  It comes with servers, storage and redundant 10 Gigabit Fiber Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) networks, a backplane giving direct connections to LAN and SAN, and a BNT top‐of‐rack switch.  Management elements include VMware vSphere, the vSphere client, IBM Systems Director 6.2, IBM DS Storage Manager 10.70, and IBM Active Energy Manager 4.3.  This all comes at a list price starting at $180,000 for “small” (up to 150 virtual machines and 7.2 TB raw storage (the capacity prior to OS/application allocations)), $380,000 for “medium” (500+ virtual machines, and 29 TB raw storage) and $750,000 for “large” (1000+ virtual machines, and 58 TB raw storage). BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud’s density and performance make it a great solution for mid‐market enterprises and for the IBM Business Partners that serve them.  Business partners are the procurement route for most smaller organizations and for geographies where local procurement is preferred.  Many of these partners have specific industry expertise, or offer additional services, such as pre‐populating and loading virtual machines, that are beneficial to their customers. These partners offer numerous component options such as blade and switch choices, turbo storage, more memory on a blade (up to 384 GB), more blades, more chasses –  ©2011 MacFarland Consulting          Page 1 of 3    
  •  and also options of ordering by a single SKU, or a set of SKUs for a particular subsystem, or by the SKU of a particular part.  These options keep their wholesale‐style operations lean and cost‐effective, while satisfying their customers by providing exactly what they need.  In addition,  a 40 page IBM Redpaper tells do‐it‐yourselfers how to put it all together. IBM Systems Director is designed to manage multiple heterogeneous systems, operating systems and applications so it can handle whatever your data center becomes.  This extensibility, accomplished by a plug‐in architecture, is important for the medium and long term.  Over time, as needed, more functionality can be added.  As an example, IBM Service Delivery Manager can support even more efficiency by delivering applications (those used only a few times a year come to mind) as services.  Or, Tivoli components that support audit logs, fine‐grained authorization, and compliance reporting may be added as they become important to the business.   There are many options to support the levels of control and automation that may be necessary or desirable.  This keeps management a consistent whole, and avoids silos of management requiring more staff.  Breadth of management has become increasingly important as applications have extended across and beyond organizational boundaries.  The business requirements made on your private cloud (for that is what BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud really is) will change, and you need a better response than “more” or “something else.”  That’s how data center “sprawl” happens. IBM BladeCenter Open Fabric Manager (BOFM), included in BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud, virtualizes LAN and SAN addresses and enhances resiliency.  It provides a single point of I/O address management across multiple chassis’, and obviates the need for reconfiguration when replacing blades.  The included IBM VirtualFabric software supports converged network functionality, reducing the number of adapters and switches required and simplifying LAN and SAN capacity planning. In addition to VMware Enterprise and VCenter, whose licenses are included in the purchase price, a new function, IBM VMready, is also included in all BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud offerings.  It focuses on VM‐aware networking, supporting all major virtualization offerings, and runs on the BNT switch (thus not consuming processor cycles).  VMready provides several key capabilities:   VM Detection, that supports discovery and tracking of VMs and their migration.  It can  also audit the traffic per VM.   VM Groups, that lets you group VMs for group‐level management.  Page 2 of 3   
  •    NMotion, a trademarked feature that tracks VM migrations and ties VM port attributes  to individual VM images so they are moved automatically with the VMs they apply to.    This last feature greatly simplifies operations and reduces the opportunity for error. VMready also facilitates interactions between other hypervisors (say, Linux servers running on KVM) and interactions with VMware’s VCenter. For aggregate products, vendors typically choose the components that create compelling value at a competitive price.  IBM has chosen carefully, as BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud resembles new small cars that can carry far more than you expect while still getting good gas mileage.  While BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud is the entry level to a growing family of IBM cloud offerings, it has the I/O and form factor density to pack a lot of business value into not a lot of floor space – or a big energy draw.  It is an infrastructure that you can evolve – from small to large, or by adding more control and automation elements – rather than just buying more of the same.   The other members of IBM’s Cloud family certainly offer more sophisticated management and many other valuable capabilities.  But, if you just want to get started in the new mode of a fully‐virtualized, balanced infrastructure in a way that grows as you need and keeps management unified, consider IBM’s BladeCenter Foundation for Cloud.   Page 3 of 3    BLW03025-USEN-00