Evolution of the IMS Database
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  • Since its inception, IMS has been at the forefront of technology in Database and Transaction Management IMS has been the first at delivering IBM solutions Some examples are: Multiple Systems Coupling Facility - IMS has been distributing workload across multiple systems for a long time, Datasharing -- IMS has been the first to provide 2-way and then N-way data sharing, and extended that to Message sharing and network sharing as well. eXtended Recovery Facility provides a hot standby capability for IMS customers. IMS is the only DB/TM system to provide this level of high availability takeover support; the same is true for Remote site Recovery IMS Fast Path continues to support the highest transaction per second database access solution As we move further into the new era of computing, IMS is still leading the way. More than 30 years since the first IMS-ready message for the Apollo Space program, IMS and the zSeries are breaking technology barriers, but sometimes taken for granted. But we continue to lead the industry in performance, availability and ebusiness enablement.
  • The IMS system code resides in a set of IMS System Address Spaces – the Control Region, the Database Recovery Control (DBRC) address space, the DL/1 Separate Address Space (DLISAS) and optionally the IBM Resource Lock Manager (IRLM) address space. Their functions will be discussed shortly. Each of these address spaces – and particularly the Control region – makes extensive use of multi-tasking. The result is that an IMS online system is a very highly parallel system. On the previous slide, we mentioned that batch applications run in BMP regions. Messages are processed in Message Processing Regions – the applications are referred to as Message Processing Programs or MPPs. There are various options for running MPPs, but typically, an MPP is dynamically scheduled into a dependent region as required, and deleted when it is both no longer needed and the dependent region is needed to process some other waiting transaction. In other words, an IMS Transaction Manager will dynamically manage its application resources according to the changing workload.
  • IMS is a database and transaction management system. A Database is a collection of interrelated data items, stored once and organized in a form for easy retrieval. A Database Management System is a collection of programs for storing organizing, selecting, modifying, and extracting data from a database. An IMS database is organized hierarchically with levels of data, each dependent on the higher level. an IMS Database Management system organizes the data in different structures to optimize storage and retrieval, and ensure integrity and recovery.
  • ROOT: The highest-level (no parent) segment in a hierarchy PARENT: A Segment above a dependent segment CHILD: A Segment below and dependent on a higher-level segment There is a maximum of 255 segment types . Instructor Notes: Purpose — Describe a database hierarchy and define key terms. Details — The same data is stored as on the traditional file but the information is now separated into segments. The segments are arranged in a hierarchy and a program is given access to only segments needed to do its job. Additional Information — Transition Statement — Some more of the critical definitions in an IMS database.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — List IMS Access Methods. Details — IMS physically stores database information in several different ways. This section will discuss the more commonly used of these access methods with special attention paid to those used most frequently. New with V7 are the PHDAM and PHIDAM access methods. We will discuss how you can partition DL/I databases a little later in this unit. DEDB databases will be covered as a separate topic later in this course. Additional Information — Transition Statement — Each of the database access methods uses one or more z/OS datasets.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Show dataset organization of select IMS access methods. Details — HSAM and HISAM seldom used. HDAM and HIDAM differ in that HIDAM has an index automatically maintained by IMS. GSAM is used for a sequential input or output file and has no index. Additional Information — Transition Statement — The most commonly used access methods rely on pointers to navigate the database.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Show physical storage alternatives. Details — HSAM and HISAM use sequential option. HDAM and HIDAM use direct. Direct processing is much preferred since inserts of new segments are much more efficient and space of deleted segments is immediately reusable. Additional Information — Note the segments are all in hierarchic sequence in this diagram. That may be true when the database was initially loaded or recently reorganized, but rarely remains that way over time. Transition Statement — Here's how an HD segment looks when it is stored.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Illustrate HD Segment. Details — Two parts to segment: Prefix Used by IMS - not available to application Data Information to or from application Illustrate use of PCF/PTF to link simple hierarchy. Additional Information — Transition Statement — Here is an example of a simple hierarchy.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Hierarchy example. Details — Used to illustrate physical organization on following pages. Additional Information — Transition Statement — Let's see how this hierarchy would be stored in an HSAM database.
  • This is what a valid twin chain should look like. Starting from a root, each child segment in the twin chain points to another segment of the same type, until we get to a pointer of zero (end of twin chain). Now we just need to identify the order of the child segments in this twin chain.
  • In HDAM/PHDAM, the data can be stored in a VSAM Entry Sequenced Data Set (ESDS) or an OSAM Data Set. If VSAM ESDS, the first CONTROL INTERVAL is Reserved If OSAM, use BLOCKs instead of CONTROL INTERVALS (CIs). (The first block is the BITMAP.) For all practical purposes, a VSAM ESDS and an OSAM Data Set are interchangeable in IMS. Instructor Notes: Purpose — Describe HDAM/PHDAM database structure. Details — No index - direct access provide by randomizer. A well-organized HDAM/PHDAM database will provide excellent direct processing since there is no index I/O to find the root segment. The data is not available to the program in root key sequence - the disadvantage of not having an index. Additional Information — Transition Statement — To summarize HDAM/PHDAM.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — HDAM/PHDAM summary. Details — HDAM/PHDAM should be the access method of choice when direct processing will be used to access the database. Since there is no index, I/O will be minimized and performance enhanced. Additional Information — Transition Statement — The most commonly used of the access methods.
  • 1. In HIDAM/PHIDAM, only the key is stored in a VSAM Key-Sequenced Data Set (KSDS). 2. The data can be stored in a VSAM Entry-Sequenced Data Set (ESDS) or an OSAM Data Set. If VSAM ESDS, the first CI is Reserved. If OSAM, Use BLOCKs instead of Control Intervals (CIs). (The first block is the BITMAP.) For all practical purposes, a VSAM ESDS and an OSAM DS are interchangeable in IMS. Instructor Notes: Purpose — Describe HIDAM/PHIDAM database structure. Details — Direct access provided by Index database - automatically maintained by IMS and VSAM. A HIDAM/PHIDAM database will provide direct processing and the index allows processing in root key sequence - the advantage to having an index. Since most applications have both sequential and direct requirements HIDAM/PHIDAM is the most commonly used of the IMS access methods. Additional Information — Transition Statement — To summarize HIDAM/PHIDAM.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — HIDAM/PHIDAM summary. Details — Supports both direct and sequential processing. Index IO may affect performance in direct mode, but can be controlled with proper buffering for the index. Additional Information — Transition Statement — Since V7, we can now partition DL/I databases.
  • GSAM is implemented with z/OS access methods BSAM or VSAM ESDS Sequentially organized Fixed or variable length records No prefix Write checkpoint data set for subsequent file repositioning Available in IMS Batch or Batch Message Processing (BMP) environments Input data into programs, or extract data for reports Instructor Notes: Purpose — Describe GSAM access method. Details — GSAM is not a hierarchy but a sequential database. Primary use is to allow automatic repositioning after restart of long running job. Additional Information — Transition Statement — There are many tools to help you work with IMS.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Hierarchic access method summary. Details — Direct - HDAM/PHDAM. Sequential or both - HIDAM/PHIDAM. HISAM ruled out because of performance considerations. Additional Information — Transition Statement — There's one more access method to discuss.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Summary of access methods. Details — The similarities and differences in the principal types of IMS access methods were identified The general application requirements which dictate the choice of access methods were learned Sequential - HSAM and HISAM Direct or Mixed - HDAM/PHDAM and HIDAM/PHIDAM Non-Hierarchic - GSAM Tools used to work with IMS databases were identified Transition Statement — There are also some optional database functions we may wish to use.
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — Discuss the large database and high availability characteristics of HALDB (High Availability Large Database). Details — Describe how databases can be partitioned. Specifically that database records are grouped into partitions. Maximum number of partitions per database is 1001. One or more partitions can define a single database. The hierarchical structure is maintained within a partition. A partition can have a maximum of 10 data set groups. The maximum data set size is 4 GB for VSAM and OSAM. The recommended size is 2 GB and even length block size is enforced. Regarding partition independence, discuss how database utilities are allowed on a partition basis as well as concurrent utility processing against individual partitions. Discuss that the master database remains available when a partition is unavailable. Self-healing pointers - Reorganized databases can be immediately usable after image copies have been created because neither prefix resolution or prefix update utility processing is required. And finally, discuss the number of data sets that can make up a partition and the three new data types for HALDB, PHDAM, PHIDAM, and PSINDEX. Databases must be registered to DBRC. Minimal or no application changes are required. Primary index is automatically defined for each partition in PHIDAM and logical relationships and secondary indexing are supported. A partition definition is separated from the database structure definition and the data for the partition definition is stored and maintained in DBRC's RECON data sets. Therefore, DBDGENs will not be used for partitioned databases; instead, we have a new HALDB Partition Definition Utility which interfaces with DBRC. Additional Information — Transition Statement — Other HALDB characteristics.
  • Online reorganization (OLR) is essentially phase two of HALDB. IMS V9 OLR provides a fully integrated online reorganization by partition of HALDBs with concurrent online update and availability. This is totally non-disruptive. Users can adjust the pace of OLR to further minimize their online impact. Multiple partitions can be reorganized in parallel. This online reorganization function provides for enhanced database availability. Coordination is provided through the IMS DBRC facility.
  • Consider the database records for the entire HALDB partition to be ordered from left to right in three categories: Those records that have already been copied Those records that are currently being copied Those records that are still to be copied A cursor is a key or RBA of a database record that has already been copied to the output data set; a cursor marks which records are still in the input data set. As the copying proceeds, this cursor moves forward through the database (from left to right in the diagram).
  • Database quiesce enables you to create a coordinated recovery point across an IMSplex for IMS Fast Path data entry databases (DEDBs), Fast Path areas, full-function databases (including High Availability Large Databases - HALDBs), and database groups, without taking your resources offline or causing applications to encounter an unavailable database. When the quiesce function is invoked, the point of consistency is reached when all updates that are in progress are committed. After all updates are committed, and stored on DASD, the database data sets reflect the current database information because no updates are pending. At this time, the point of consistency has been reached locally on a single IMS. This process must occur on every IMS in the IMSplex that is actively using the database. When all activity has been quiesced, a new recovery point is recorded. You can create a point of consistency on a database without making the database unavailable to applications by using a new form of the existing type-2 UPDATE command (for example, UPDATE DB START (QUIESCE)). This command quiesces all work in progress so that a new recovery point can be created for a database while it is actively in use in the IMSplex. This enhancement should reduce the complexity of establishing a recovery point for a database. The reduced complexity should allow more frequent recovery points to be created for a database resource. We see value to your business with this enhancement by requiring less complexity in establishing a recovery point. Creating frequent recovery points could reduce the impact of an outage on a database since there would be less data to be processed during recovery.
  • Before going into the detail of quiesce, let’s look at an illustration of the current process required to create a recovery point for a database resource. In this picture there is a simple IMSplex with three different IMS systems in the DBRC sharing group. The database resource is in use on the three different IMS systems. First a user needs to take the resource offline. To do this the /DBR command is issued for the resource and routed to each IMS or issued on each IMS. On each IMS, the command checks for activity on the resource, if there is none then the command can be processed. Each IMS will go to the RECON and record a DEALLOC time. The database resource is closed and the data sets are deallocated. Next the user needs to check to make sure that the command was successful on each IMS system. Now a recovery point has been created for the database. Finally the user needs to make the resource available online. To do this the /STA command is issued for the resource and routed to each IMS or issued on each IMS. On each IMS, the command makes the database available. The database data sets are not allocated, and they are closed after the /DBR command. The OPEN option would be required to allocate and open the data sets on the /STA command, otherwise the first access will open the data sets.
  • This is an illustration of the process to create a recovery point for a database resource with Database Quiesce. In this picture there is a simple IMSplex with three different IMS systems in the DBRC sharing group. The database resource is in use on the three different IMS systems. To create the recovery point issue the quiesce command. The command will be processed by a single IMS, the command master. That command master will communicate with the other IMS systems to get the resource quiesced. If there is current activity on the resource the command will wait for a point of consistency to be reached. After that point the access on the database is stopped. The IMS systems will communicate back that the resource is quiesced. The command master will update the RECON on behalf of all the IMS systems, creating a common DEALLOC timestamp. The OLDS are switched on each IMS (as the default). After the quiesce point is reached, the quiesce on the resource is released. When the quiesce is released then a new ALLOC will be recorded for DEDB areas. No ALLOC is recorded for Full Function databases, instead, the first update access to the database will create a new ALLOC in the RECON. The command master communicates with all IMS systems to make the resource available again.
  • IMS calls from ODBA programs must be made to AERTDLI. This is a new entry point name for calls using the AIB interface. ODBA programs must establish and terminate connections to IMS subsystems. This is done with the CIMS call which is new. The APSB call is used to schedule a PSB. The DPSB call is used to deallocate a PSB which has been scheduled. These are the same calls that may also be used with APPC/IMS programs. Calls to databases are the same as for other types of IMS programs. Sync points must be created, but IMS synchronization calls, such as CHKP or SYNC, cannot be used. Instead, the RRS/MVS commit unit of recovery calls (SRRCMIT or ATRCMIT) must be used. This invokes RRS sync point processing.
  • Calls for one thread must use the same AIB. These are the APSB call, the database calls (such as GU, ISRT, and REPL), and the DPSB call. If a connector has multiple threads, each thread must operate under its own TCB. This is a requirement of RRS commit processing. Sync points are invoked for all of the work under a TCB. Sync points must be invoked with the RRS Commit_UR service. This is done with either the SRRCMIT or ATRCMIT calls. RRS services are documented in OS/390 MVS Programming: Resource Recovery (GC28-1739).
  • IMS Open Database is a new function in IMS 11 taking on the challenge of modernizing IMS DB access and application development. It addresses two significant bottlenecks for business growth: Connectivity – IMS DB has been historically grounded to the mainframe…certainly there are ways to get to it but none straightforward and simple. Programmatic access – even when connectivity isn’t an issue – the skills aren’t readily available to develop new application workload. DLI isn’t industry standard and skills aren’t plentiful. With IMS 11 we are rolling out a complete suite of Universal drivers in support of IMS database connectivity and programmatic access. The intent is to access IMS in a uniform way using the most relevant industry standards from any platform and from within the most strategic runtimes. A standards-based approach opens a lot of growth and expansion opportunity. The fundamental communication protocol we will use to communicate with IMS Connect will be the industry standard Distributed Relational Database Architecture (DRDA) protocol. Single Universal driver in support of both type-4 and type-2 connectivity in all supported runtimes – there’s no need to learn another driver’s semantics to toggle between environments and desired connectivity – it’s all built in to the framework. Distribution of resources within an IMSplex is included. The idea is to extend the reach of IMS by extending the data. IMS DB metadata is exposed via the standard JDBC API and therefore can be consumed and visualized by JDBC tooling. By allowing inspection of metadata, the next step is query. Query syntax uses standard query language syntax. IMS Open Database – IMS Open Database offers direct distributed access to IMS database resources. The distributed nature is two-fold. At the IMSplex level, it allows cross-LPAR access to any IMS database in the IMSplex. At the pure distributed level, it allows non-mainframe (e.g., Windows OS) access directly to IMS database resources through industry standard interfaces. This enhancement extends IMS Connect as the gateway to IMS DB. It adds a new Common Service Layer address space which manages connections to the IMS ODBA interface. This enhancement improves application access to IMS. IMS has seen an increased number of requests for distributed access to all database types. IMS Connect is currently the gateway to IMS TM. It will also become the gateway to IMS DB. Distribution of database assets comes in two flavours Distribution within an IMSplex. Applications on one LPAR can access an IMS database on another LPAR Distribution to non-System z platforms. Applications on a non-System z platform can have direct IMS DB access without needing an IMS transaction to proxy the data. The Universal drivers (JCA, JDBC, DLI) will allow both distributed as well as local (CICS, IMS, WAS z, DB2 z) access to IMS databases.
  • The intent of the following 4 charts is to show the current topology and illustrate the evolution to the new one, pointing out the enhancements at each step. As a point of fact, WAS z/OS cannot take advantage of ODBM’s cross-LPAR feature unless WAS itself embraces SCI. Applications can use the out-of-the-box compatibility mode to use AERTDLI and have those calls routed to an ODBM which will still prevent the U113 abend – but WAS and the ODBM address space will still need to be on the same LPAR. It is just an illustrative example showing what can be possible with WAS z/OS as an ODBM client. The current solution (whether or not we are talking about distributed or local access to IMS DB) leverages ODBA as the API to access IMS database resources. ODBA is capable of making address space to address space calls (PC calls) in the same logical partition. The net effect of this is that the ODBA modules need to be on the same LPAR as the IMS CTL region. These modules (ODBA) are loaded in the address space of the application, which is in turn loaded in the address space of the container. In this case the container is WebSphere AS. The result of this is that the WAS installation has to be on the same LPAR as the IMS DB itself. There is no isolation.
  • By leveraging SCI, the applications can be on any LPAR in an IMSplex. SCI uses either PC or XCF calls to communicate with other SCI components. XCF allows calls to go across LPARs in an IMSplex. This allows applications (and their containers) to be isolated on their own LPARs.
  • What we are doing is creating a new CSL address space to house the ODBA modules. This interface will use SCI as its communication mechanism. The ODBA modules are no longer tightly coupled with the applications themselves (and therefore the containers). By leveraging SCI, the applications can be on any LPAR in an IMSplex. SCI uses either PC or XCF calls to communicate with other SCI components. XCF allows calls to go across LPARs in an IMSplex. This allows applications (and their containers) to be isolated on their own LPARs.
  • This leads us to our real goal, which is to leverage IMS Connect as the complete gateway solution for IMS TM, OM, and now DB. IMS Connect will be augmented to be an ODBM client. This will allow distributed applications to leverage the TCP/IP protocol to communicate with IMS Connect, which can then access any database in the entire IMSplex. IMS Connect becomes the IMS Gateway to both IMS TM and IMS DB. WebSphere and DB2 Stored Procedures no longer have to be on the same LPAR with IMS when they interface with the IMS ODBM (Open Database Manager) address space. The ODBM address space must be on the same LPAR with IMS due to the use of the ODBA (Open Database Access) interface. Distributed clients would now have the option of going directly to IMS Connect for IMS DB requests. Existing DB Resource Adapter applications are unaffected by Open Database. In order to exploit Open Database from existing DB Resource Adapter applications, a migration to the JCA 1.5 programming model would have to be done.
  • We are providing different API layers that leverage the DRDA protocol. The DLI Java API is an API that mimics the traditional DLI API plus a few more advanced concepts. We are also offering XA capabilities for applications leveraging our framework. (Definition of XA is below.) For Open Database, we are offering a type 4 JDBC driver built on top of this framework. Ultimately we will offer a J2EE (Java Enterprise Edition) platform solution which is packaged as a JCA (Java Connection Architecture) 1.5 resource adapter for deployment in WebSphere Application Server (which is a J2EE server). (Editorial note: Sun dropped the ‘2’ so it is really now JEE and not J2EE but most folks still keep the ‘2’.) This JCA resource adapter will leverage all of the robust features of the J2EE platform (connection management, transaction management, security management, XA support, logging, etc.) and will allow for direct distributed access to IMS database resources. These interfaces will provide a base set of APIs that future clients (such as XQuery) can be built on top of (we have an XQuery implementation today, but now with ODB these APIs will be distributed). The XA standard is an X/Open specification for distributed transaction processing (DTP). It describes the interface between the global transaction manager and the local resource manager. We are the resource manager (from JDBC driver through IMS connect, ODBM and IMS).
  • A segment is a table…a field in a segment is a column…but what about the relationships between segments? How can we report that relationally and still preserve the original IMS data model and normalization? Key idea here is that we do not want to fundamentally change the IMS model – it needs to remain intact.
  • RRS=Y must be specified in the configuration for a global transaction. This slide shows how Open Database achieves cross LPAR transaction management. When a client establishes a connection through IIMS Connect to ODBM several things are done to establish a coordinated Unit of Work. First IMS Connect creates the parent Unit of Recovery. IMS Connect then sends the UR token to ODBM. ODBM then expresses interest in the UR as a child. At this point we have a coordinated Unit of Recovery established.
  • SQL PA for DB2 – query explain – for IMS will show the actual DL/I call – also how IMS does it ie secondary index, etc. Another – force = over >=/<= in parent SSAs - this will increase performance Tooling support – if a pgm runs wild, only need to stop PSB. No ned to bring down IMS. N number of apps using same PSB. If an Open DB app is eating up a PSB, stop a psb is no good. That will stop all the other apps. So we want to have the PSB stopped at the ODBM level (an operator to issue) that way other non-OpenDB apps wont be stopped.
  • For performance in general – customers have indicated that for Java running on the mainframe their business requires at least 1200 tx/sec. Our Java frameworks (both JDBC and DLI) far exceed that rate. While Java will never be as fast as COBOL - with all of the improvements in JVM technology (JIT technology, advances in garbage collection, etc) the Java numbers are improving with each new release. The numbers we are getting for Java workload exceed any performance requirement we’ve seen to date. COBOL and PL/I are proven on the mainframe to meet business performance criteria. Our measurements show that Java is also more than capable of being integrated into the enterprise without compromising the performance objectives. Coupled with z/OS specialty engines (zAAP, zIIP) Java provides a very robust solution opportunity. Note: Java is only 20% slower than COBOL Java DLI (type 2) application on z/OS in a JMP results are as follows: IMS 10: 7892 2CPs and 2zAAPs with 100 JMPs in a lab environment COBOL application on z/OS results are as follows: IMS 10: 9980 2CPs with 100 MPPs in a lab environment Initial performance testing indicates that the Universal DLI drivers also far exceed business performance requirements. While we can and will make improvements to the throughput for distributed access, it will never be as fast as running the application on the System z platform where the data resides. Note: Distributed application continues to meet business requirements. A co-located solution (application and data on System z) outperforms as expected Java DLI (type 4) results are as follows: IMS 10: 4000 Single IMS, Single, IMS Connect, Single ODBM Java DLI (type 2) results are as follows: IMS 10: 7892 trans/sec 2CPs and 2zAAPs with 100 JMPs in a lab environment Without doing any significant tuning of the Universal JDBC drivers we are only seeing a 5% overhead incurred for all of the JDBC API processing as well as SQL processing. Java DLI (type 4) results are as follows: IMS 10: 4000 Single IMS, Single, IMS Connect, Single ODBM Java JDBC (type 4) results are as follows: IMS 10: 3800 Single IMS, Single, IMS Connect, Single ODBM
  • The key to the XML DB project is the mapping of XML schemas with IMS PSBs & DBDs.
  • Tooling takes IMS DB and converts into XML. This is the bottom-up approach. We are also looking into a top-down approach to be able to create IMS databases from an XML schema.
  • In V10 we introduced support for a good number of XQuery calls. XQuery was designed to query properly formed collections of XML data. That fits perfectly with what we have in IMS – a bunch of records viewed as XML records. Semantically similar to SQL.
  • DLIModel Utility is used to generated the DatabaseView class that needs to be deployed within the WAS classpath The DatabaseView class is a relational representation of the IMS database which is hierarchical by nature
  • IMS Database does not have its own launch point since with it’s JDBC support is functionally the same as the other databases listed above. The following screenshots can apply to any of the databases and not just IMS
  • The Metadata URL is an IMS specific parameter and points to the DatabaseView class generated by the DLIModel Utility Note that connection profiles can be reused and removes the need to respescify the parameters if more than one feed is created for that database Support has been included for both managed (JNDI) and unmanaged (DriverManager) connections
  • GUI only allows for the creation of simple select statements Preview button will show the first 10 entries of the query in a table form
  • The main challenges being addressed by the IMS Enterprise Suite is the installation and management of products containing open source. This is a challenge both for IBM as well as customers who may want to isolate products with open source from their proprietary software for legal and other reasons.. IMS Enterprise Suite V1.1 is available as a separate, no-charge product that includes a collection of IMS middleware functions and tools based on industry-standard tools and interfaces. The IMS Enterprise Suite V1.1 components will be seamlessly integrated with IBM WebSphere, IBM Rational and industry tooling. These components support access to IMS data and transactions running on IMS version 10 or 11, from both z/OS mainframe and distributed environments. It supports SMP/E for z/OS components and the IBM Installation Manager for most distributed components. And it is available both through web download as well as the standard mainframe ordering and SMP/E installation process. Enables them to install and get service through regular IMS service stream!
  • This release of IMS Enterprise Suite V1.1 includes: SOAP Gateway, C/C++ and Java APIs for use with IMS Connect, Java Message Service (JMS) API, a JAR file that must be present to support the Java API for synchronous callout in IMS V10 and V11 and DLIModel utility plugin
  • Any feature of ES can be installed two ways: Two ways to install it. Mainframe - use SMP/E Distributed platform you can use Installation Manager Some components only run on one of the other: SOAP (both) DLI (only distributed)
  • Puts a GUI front end (first section). Takes advantage of base structure (Eclipse). Can run separate – doesn’t need to be part of anything. Lets you see what the structure of your data is. What the address consists of. Way to visualize a DB. Metadata generation – using COBOL copy books. You can see it and learn descriptions of it. Can take stuff from cobol copy books and pl/I copy books (which are called includes) DL/I Model Utility plug in provides a user friendly interface, simplifies IMS metadata generation, eases IMS Java and XML database application development and access, and offers a visual representation of IMS databases. Enhancements ease use of this utility, and its users can now import PL/I Include to redefine segment layout in IMS metadata, as well as take advantage of the new IMS Universal JDBC driver. Enhancements also include: Export PSB graphical view as graphic files (JPG or BMP) Auto select DBDs that referred by a PSB in wizard - enhancing the DLIModel utility wizard to automatically select DBDs refered to by a PSB and automatically merge existing metadata with modified PSB and DBD sources Support PL/I Include Import – allowing PL/I copybook import Add PROCOPT to the IMS metadata for the IMS JDBC driver – adding PROCOPT to the DLIDatabase View metadata class Add Virtual Foreign Key view to the PSB graphical editor – providing graphical view of virtual foreign key fields. Change GUI messages to match with product messages prefixes Add the search capability to the PSB graphical view - Completing the graphical editor of PSB and DBD with search, save and print functions Update the existing metadata with newly updated PSB/DBD source Ship under the new IMS Enterprise Suite through IBM Installation Manager - Seamlessly shell-sharing with other Eclipse based products from IBM with IBM Installation Manager Customer requirements: Customers want DLIModel utility to be able to import COBOL copybook with PIC G(n) statement and generate appropriate DLITypeInfo. Utility should also provide function to specify CCSID Customers want to be able to import PL/I includes Customers want to be able to integrate user-defined information in metadata into modified PSB and DBD source
  • To access IMS database using JDBC, you must describe to IMS Java the application’s view of the databases. The application view information is in the PSB, but you must first convert this information into a form that you can use in your Java application: a subclass of DLIDatabaseView called IMS Java metadata class. This is what a DLIDatabaseView class might look like
  • The DLIModel utility GUI is a plug-in on top of Eclipse or any Eclipse based product like RAD, RDz, WID, Data Studio… - describe each one of these and describe how it fits into the Appl Devt workshop activities……it’s important to give an overview of the utility, and then state what functions will be used in the demo or hands-on exercises. IMS database visualization tool: Visualize an entire IMS PSB Can view and print each PCB individually Hierarchy, segments, fields, types, etc IMS database metadata generation tool: Generates the necessary metadata that is consumed at runtime by IMS JDBC driver, XML-DB, XQuery, IMS DB Web services Database metadata (the in-memory models of PSB and DBD) DLIDatabaseView for IMS JDBC XML schema for XML DB, XQuery Deployable IMS DB WS artifacts (EAR and WSDL files) for IMS DB Web services Bottom up tooling approach Parses PSB and DBD source using either Control statements or Wizard panels Optionally import COBOL copybook definitions to define field layouts for each segment
  • The DLIModel utility GUI is a plug-in on top of Eclipse or any Eclipse based product like RAD, RDz, WID, Data Studio… - describe each one of these and describe how it fits into the Appl Devt workshop activities……it’s important to give an overview of the utility, and then state what functions will be used in the demo or hands-on exercises. IMS database visualization tool: Visualize an entire IMS PSB Can view and print each PCB individually Hierarchy, segments, fields, types, etc IMS database metadata generation tool: Generates the necessary metadata that is consumed at runtime by IMS JDBC driver, XML-DB, XQuery, IMS DB Web services Database metadata (the in-memory models of PSB and DBD) DLIDatabaseView for IMS JDBC XML schema for XML DB, XQuery Deployable IMS DB WS artifacts (EAR and WSDL files) for IMS DB Web services Bottom up tooling approach Parses PSB and DBD source using either Control statements or Wizard panels Optionally import COBOL copybook definitions to define field layouts for each segment
  • Instructor Notes: Purpose — List database tools products. Details — There is a collection of utilities which may be purchased to help process, maintain, and tune IMS databases; these are just a few of them. Collectively they are called the Database Tools (DBT) and may be purchased separately or as a collection. For more detailed information, refer to the what does DBT Version Do? section of IMS System Utilities/Data Base Tools General Information manual, GH21-0540-03. Additional Information — Transition Statement —
  • IMS Database Solution Pack for z/OS = A complete end-to-end Reorganization solution High Performance tooling from the first Unload to the final Image Copy and re-building of indexes The power of parallelism means less elapsed time and a shorter batch window New Smart Reorg feature saves CPU and increases productivity – eliminating the maintenance burden IMS Database Solution Pack combines the following products into a single offering: v IBM IMS Database Reorganization Expert for z/OS v IBM IMS High Performance Image Copy for z/OS v IBM IMS High Performance Load for z/OS v IBM IMS High Performance Pointer Checker for z/OS v IBM IMS High Performance Prefix Resolution for z/OS v IBM IMS High Performance Unload for z/OS v IBM IMS Index Builder for z/OS v IBM IMS Library Integrity Utilities for z/OS v IBM IMS Database Repair Facility
  • IMS Performance Solution Pack combines the following tools into a single offering: v IBM IMS Connect Extensions for z/OS v IBM IMS Performance Analyzer for z/OS v IBM IMS Problem Investigator for z/OS IMS Fast Path Solution Pack combines the following products into a single offering: v IBM IMS High Performance Fast Path Utilities for z/OS v IBM IMS High Performance Image Copy for z/OS v IBM IMS Library Integrity Utilities for z/OS v IBM IMS Database Repair Facility
  • How the IBM Strategy can help Mainframe customers to build their future?
  • Marist College and IBM have jointly developed several unique Enterprise Systems Certificate programs.These worldwide programs are designed to educate personnel who are entering the field as well as those with experience in System z and z/OS , AIX on Power Systems , and variety of application programming tracks including COBOL , DB2 , Assembler language and IMS . A combination of lecture and “hands on” experience helps build valuable skills needed by mainframe professionals. You can learn about the z/OS program by viewing the z/OS Certificate Highlights video presented by the Marist Director of Large Systems Education. The specific organization of the Certificates and classes is available in the appropriate program overview section of the web site. This training is extremely cost effective due to financial support from IBM and New York State. Consult the financial information section for their program of interest.
  • IMS continues to be a premier server with architected standard interfaces New products and tools from a variety of vendors provide access to IMS transactions and data
  • We need to create awareness and demand with the USERS….i.e. the applications architects who recommend and design new apps or re-engineer legacy apps. They recommend what they know, and they have little to no awareness of how to write JAVA code to talk to IMS, how IMS plugs into SOA, how you can reuse existing transactions and data without rewriting, and how these techniques are much cheaper than rewriting apps. Challenge is reaching these people – they don’t go to IMS conferences, IOD etc. We need to learn to speak their language and talk to them not about feature/function of IMS but about cost, ease of development, fitting into their current SOA projects etc. Nintendo doesn’t market the Wii to parents. Parents stand in line all night to buy a Wii for their kid for Christmas because Nintendo has done a fabulous marketing job of convincing the kid that this is the best game system for him. Same concept with IMS, if we can create demand with the people that will actually be the end user, then the IT guys and management will go along. We are already starting to get feedback from customers about IMSs “new lease on life” . The SOA story needs to go hand in hand with the “back to basics” of IMS….why did they choose IMS in the first place? Because it’s the best product available (then and now) to support their critical business applications. Nothing else comes close to the performance and reliability of IMS.

Evolution of the IMS Database Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Evolution of IMS Database From the Moon to the Cloud Kiran Challapalli
  • 2. IMS Database Progress Data Base Concurrent Update From Multiple User/ System Multiple Systems Coupling (MSC) Batch DBMS Exploit MP Architecture Two Phase Commit Deadlock Detection > 2500 Transactions Per Second 1968 2011+ Concurrent Image Copy Parallel Systems N-Way Data Sharing 2-way Data Sharing JDBC Access Remote Site Recovery APPC/IMS Distributed Access ... Web Services > 1000 Transactions Per Second ~28000 Transactions Per Second Java Dependent Regions
  • 3. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 4. IMS Database Manager Architecture
    • Highly Parallel Architecture exploiting System z
      • An IMS control region with multiple system address spaces, each with multiple tasks
      • Batch programs (called BMPs or JBPs) can also be run concurrently
        • IMS standalone batch also supported
      • Access from CICS, DB2 Stored Procedures, WAS on z/OS
    DLISAS DBRC CONTROL REGION IMS Log RECON IMS DB Up to 999 Threads IRLM IMS System Address Spaces BMPs & JBPs CICS Threads ODBA Threads SCI OM DB2 DB
  • 5. IMS/DB is a Database Management System
    • A Database
      • is a collection of interrelated data items, stored once and organized in a form for easy retrieval.
    • A Database Management System
      • is a collection of programs for storing, organizing, selecting, modifying, and extracting data from a database.
    • IMS DB is organized hierarchically
      • To optimize storage and retrieval
      • To ensure integrity and recovery
    A B C D
  • 6. IMS Database Structure EMPLOYEE NO. EMPLOYEE NAME DEPARTMENT DATE HIRED ADDR LINE FIT FICA STATE LOCAL EMPLOYEE SALARY ADDRESS TAXES DEDUCT TYPE AMT BAL GROSS SALARY SALARY CLASS AUTH DATE Level 1 Root Segment Level 2 Child Segment Level 3
  • 7.
    • Exploitation of System z Parallel Sysplex
      • Shared Databases
      • OSAM Caching
      • Fast Database Recovery
      • Global resource management
      • Single system image for automation
    IMS Database Manager Architecture … IMS1 IMS3 IMS4 IMS2 DB Shared Resources AUTOMATION SVSO OSAM VSAM LOCK Resource CF Coupling Facility
  • 8. IMS Database Physical Storage
    • Random Access by Key
    • Keyed Sequential Access
    • Other physical storage methods are available
    VSAM ESDS OR OSAM DATA INDEX KEY VSAM KSDS DATA VSAM ESDS OR OSAM HDAM / PHDAM HIDAM / PHIDAM
  • 9. IMS Hierarchic Access Methods
    • Basic: Access Method is Transparent to Program
      • HSAM: Hierarchic Sequential
      • HISAM: Hierarchic Indexed Sequential
      • HDAM: Hierarchic Direct
      • PHDAM: Partitioned Hierarchic Direct
      • HIDAM: Hierarchic Indexed Direct
      • PHIDAM: Partitioned Hierarchic Indexed Direct
    • Specialized: z/OS-compatible
      • SHSAM: Simple Hierarchic Sequential
      • SHISAM: Simple Hierarchic Indexed Sequential
      • GSAM: Generalized Sequential
    • Fast Path:
      • DEDB: Data Entry Database
  • 10. Physical Storage (1 of 2)
    • Hierarchic Sequential (HS…)
    • Hierarchic Direct (HD…)
    • Sequential
    INDEX VSAM ESDS OR OSAM DATA VSAM ESDS OR BSAM DATA INDEX VSAM ESDS DATA VSAM QSAM DATA GSAM KEY VSAM KSDS DATA VSAM KSDS DATA VSAM ESDS OR OSAM HSAM HDAM / PHDAM HISAM HIDAM / PHIDAM
  • 11. Physical Storage (2 of 2)
    • Sequential - Segments are related by physical adjacency
    • Direct - Segments are related by pointers
    A B C D D 13 D 12 D 11 C 31 C 12 C 11 B 12 B 11 A 1 D 23 D 22 D 21 D 22 D 21 C 22 C 21 B 1 A 2 D 13 D 12 D 11 C 13 C 12 C 11 B 12 B 11 A 1
  • 12. HD Pointers
    • HDAM/ PHDAM
    • HIDAM/PHIDAM
    SEGMENT PREFIX Physical Child Pointers Physical Twin Pointers Segment code Delete byte S D POINTER C B AREA DATA DATA
  • 13. Hierarchic Database Records COURSE C 2 INSTRUCT I 21 L 22 CLASS L 21 STUDENT S 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 22 INSTRUCT I 11 STUDENT S 11 COURSE C 1 CLASS L 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 12 13
  • 14. What a Database Should Look Like Child SC=06 Child SC=06 Child SC=06 Child SC=06 Root SC=01 End of twin chain PTF=0
  • 15. HDAM/PHDAM Storage Format KEY RANDOMIZER CONTROL INTERVAL and POINTER Control Interval or Block RESERVED (VSAM) BIT MAP C 7 L 71 S 71 S 72 S 73 I 71 C 2 L 21 I 21 I 22 S 21 S 22 S 23 S 24 S 25 E S D S / O S A M
  • 16.
    • Access to a database record is through a root segment via a randomizing module
    • Segments of a database record related by direct pointers
    • Segments, once stored, never move
    • Space of deleted segments is immediately reusable
    • Uses: Primarily direct application processing requiring fast access to the root
    HDAM/PHDAM Summary ROOT KEY RANDOMIZER C 1 . . . . . . C L I S 1 11 12 11 C L I S 1 11 12 11 C L I I I S 1 11 11 12 13 11
  • 17. HIDAM/PHIDAM Storage Format Control Interval RESERVED (VSAM) BIT MAP S 13 S 14 C 2 L 21 I 21 I 22 S 21 S 22 S 23 E S D S / O S A M C 1 L 11 I 12 I 13 S 11 I 11 S 12 S 24 S 25 K S D S Control Interval C1 C2 KEY KEY VSAM INDEX
  • 18. HIDAM/PHIDAM Summary
    • Direct access to a database record is via:
      • a root key index built and maintained by VSAM
      • a direct pointer maintained by IMS
    • Segments of a database record related by direct pointers
    • Segments, once stored, never move
    • Space of deleted segments is immediately reusable
    • Uses: Applications with both sequential and direct needs
      • Large numbers of segments within the database record
      • Large volume of insert and/or delete activity
    ROOT KEY C 1 C L I S 1 11 12 11 C L I I I S 1 11 11 12 13 11 C L I S 1 11 12 11 INDEX . . .
  • 19. GSAM
    • Simple Non-Hierarchic data set
    • Used mostly to ease restart process
      • More later in this class.
    COURSE C n CLASS C n INSTRUCT I STUDENT S n n n n E S D S / B S A M RECORD 1 RECORD 2 RECORD 2 CONT REC 3 REC ORD 4 . . .
  • 20. Hierarchic Summary
    • Which IMS access method ?
    • Identify the type of processing for each database
      • Direct
      • Sequential
      • Both
    • The "volatility" of the data
    • The "variability" of the database record length
  • 21. Summary
    • The similarities and differences in the principal types of IMS access methods were identified.
    • The general application requirements which dictate the choice of access methods were learned.
      • Sequential - HSAM and HISAM
      • Direct or Mixed - HDAM/PHDAM and HIDAM/PHIDAM
      • Non-Hierarchic - GSAM
    • Tools used to work with IMS databases were identified
  • 22. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 23. IMS HALDB Highlights
    • Database types
      • PHDAM - partitioned HDAM
      • PHIDAM - partitioned HIDAM
        • Index is also partitioned
      • PSINDEX - partitioned secondary index
    • Hierarchic structure is maintained
      • A database record resides in one partition
    • Partition selection
      • By key range or by user exit routine
    ...
  • 24. HALDB - What Is It?
    • Large Databases
      • Databases are partitioned
        • Up to 1001 partitions per database
        • Partitions have up to 10 data set groups
        • Partition definition separated from database structure definition
    • High Availability Databases
      • Partition Independence
        • Allocation, authorization, reorganization and recovery by partition
      • Self-Healing pointers
        • Reorganization of partition does not require changes to indexes or logically related databases which point to the partition
    • Partitioned Database Data Sets
      • PSINDEX
        • 1 data set - secondary index data set
      • PHDAM
        • 2 minimum/11 maximum - 1 for data, 1 for indirect list data set
      • PHIDAM
        • 3 minimum/ 12 maximum - 1 for data, 1 for indirect data set, 1 for primary index data set
  • 25. IMS HALDB Partitioning Options
    • Two methods of partitioning
      • Key range
        • Each partition is assigned a range of root segment keys
      • Partition Selection Exit routine
        • The exit routine assigns a root segment to a partition based on its key
    0 - 1000 1001 - 2000 2001 - 3000 9001 - 9999 ... 20US12 45US16 77US18 24UK12 78UK23 89UK00 17CA12 34CA32 85CA34 65FR49 77FR20 97FR91 ...
  • 26. IMS HALDB Benefits
    • Greater database capacity
      • "Unlimited" capacity
      • Partitions may be modified as requirements change
    • Increased database availability
      • Shortened reorganization process
      • Option of Online Reorg (IMS V9+)
      • Batch window may be shortened with concurrent processing
    • Improved performance
      • Concurrent processing against partitions
    • Application program changes are not required
    Availability Compatibility Usability Performance
  • 27. Customer Examples – More to add -
    • German Bank
      • 600 GB total capacity of all databeses, therefrom
      • 512 GB for all HALDBs
        • Largest HALDB: 340 GB
    • German Customer
      • 17 HALDB
      • Largest HALDB: 630 GB with 90 partitions and 2 secindex with 55 partitionen
    • France
      • Avant 01/2004 en France
        • AGF, Euroinformation, Natixis, Renault, Pole Emploi
      • Après 2004
        • GCA, …
    • UK Insurance
      • Largest HALDB: 140GB
  • 28. IMS HALDB Information
    • Redbook:
      • The Complete IMS HALDB Guide, All You Need to Know to Manage HALDBs
        • SG24-6945 – June 2003
        • http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/abstracts/sg246945.html?Open
    • Presentations and articles on the Web
      • IMS High Availability Large Database (HALDB)
        • http://www.ibm.com/support/techdocs/atsmastr.nsf/WebIndex/PRS185
      • Migrating to IMS HALDB – Refreshed 2009
        • http://www.ibm.com/support/techdocs/atsmastr.nsf/WebIndex/PRS693
      • Application Design and Programming with HALDB
        • http://www.ibm.com/support/techdocs/atsmastr.nsf/WebIndex/PRS490
      • Using GENJCL.USER to Allocate IMS HALDB Data Sets
        • http://www-1.ibm.com/support/techdocs/atsmastr.nsf/WebIndex/TD100491
  • 29. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 30.
    • Integrated OnLine Reorganization of HALDBs
      • HALDB OLR provides 100% availability of the largest databases in the world!
      • OLR provides non-disruptive reorganization of HALDB PHDAM and PHIDAM partitions
        • Concurrent IMS updates are allowed while OLR
        • is active
      • Planned data outage not required
    Online HALDB Reorganisation
  • 31. Relationship between Input and Output Datasets
  • 32. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 33. Shared IMS Databases CF Lock Structure Shared Databases IMS1 IMS2 IMSn
  • 34. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 35. Database Quiesce
    • Offers the ability to stop access to a Database, HALDB Partition, DEDB or Area, or Datagroup, allowing a single coordinated recovery point to be established
      • Without taking the resource offline! No /DBR is required
        • Type-2 UPDATE DB|AREA|DATAGRP command is used to start and stop quiesce
      • The recovery point will be coordinated across the IMSplex to create one common recovery point
      • Allows an image copy to be taken while the database or area is online
    • Reduces the complexity in establishing a recovery point for a database
    Improved Usability Improved Availability Reduced Complexity
  • 36. Database Quiesce…
    • Creating a recovery point without Database Quiesce…
      • Issue /DBR on each IMS to establish a recovery point
        • Each IMS will record a DEALLOC time in the RECON
        • Database resource is closed and data sets are deallocated
      • Check to make sure the database or area was successfully taken offline on each IMS
      • Issue /STA on each IMS to allow database to be used
        • OPEN option on /STA command is required to allocate and open the data sets
          • Otherwise first access will open the data sets
    Improved Usability Improved Availability Reduced Complexity IMS RECON IMS IMS
  • 37. Database Quiesce…
    • Creating a recovery point with Database Quiesce…
      • Issue UPDATE DB|AREA|DATAGRP START(QUIESCE) command
        • Command is processed by one IMS (command master) in the IMSplex
          • Databases and data sets are not closed and deallocated
          • Command waits for active use of the resource to reach a commit point and then quiesces the resource
          • Coordinated across the IMSplex, OLDS are switched on each IMS by default
          • RECON updated by one IMS with common DEALLOC timestamp on behalf of all the IMS systems
            • New allocations for FP areas done on local IMS
            • For FF databases, a new ALLOC is created at first database update after releasing the quiesce
          • Command master communicates with IMS systems to make resource available again
    Improved Usability Improved Availability Reduced Complexity IMS RECON IMS IMS
  • 38. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 39. DB2 Stored Procedures > ODBA > IMS IMS DB Services LPAR1 DB2 z WLM Java SP ODBA DB2 Client DRA
    • DB2 stored procedure example
      • DRDA Client issues SQL for stored procedure
      • DB2 invokes stored procedure
      • Stored procedure does SQL and DL/I calls
      • Client program does commit when stored procedure returns
    Universal drivers ... IMS Databases
  • 40. WAS z - ODBA – IMS DB IMS DB Services z/OS WLM EJB / Servlet ODBA JSP / Web Service DRA
    • WASz example
      • JSP or Web service calls EJB or Servlet
      • EJB or Servlet does SQL and DL/I calls
    Universal drivers ... IMS Databases
  • 41. IBM Corporation 2001 C ODBA Calls
    • IMS Calls must use AIB interface with AERTDLI
      • CIMS
        • Establishes and terminates the connection
      • APSB
        • Allocates a PSB
      • DPSB
        • Deallocates a PSB
      • DLI calls
        • Usual access to databases (GU, GN, ISRT, ...)
    • Synchronization done with SRRCMIT or ATRCMIT
  • 42. IBM Corporation 2001 C Coding Requirements
    • Calls for one unit of recovery must use the same AIB
      • APSB
      • DL/I calls
      • DPSB
    • Each thread must have its own TCB
      • Sync points are invoked for a TCB
    • Sync points must be created by RRS call
      • SRRCMIT or ATRCMIT
  • 43. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 44. IMS Open Database
    • IMS Open Database offers access to IMS database resources anywhere in the IMSplex directly from z/OS and distributed environments
      • Using industry standard Distributed Relational Database Architecture (DRDA) to communicate with IMS Connect
      • Different API layers are provided to leverage the DRDA protocol
        • IMS Universal DB Resource Adapter - to use JDBC SQL access to IMS data in a JEE environment such as WebSphere Application Server (WAS) on any TCPIP supported platform
        • IMS Universal JDBC driver - to use JDBC SQL access to IMS data in a Non-JEE environment such as stand-alone java, DB2 SP, IMS TM, CICS
        • IMS Universal DL/I driver - to issue calls that are similar to DL/I directly to IMS from a Non-JEE Java environment
        • RYO - Use a programming language of your choice to issue DRDA commands directly to IMS Connect
      • IMS Connect becomes the gateway to IMS Transactions and IMS Data
    • Makes Application development and Connectivity much simpler!
    Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards
  • 45. Open Database Environment LPAR A z/OS Distributed J C A 1.0 T C P I P WebSphere IMS DB CTL IMS PC S O A P IIOP Current Solution WAS z/OS O D B A T C P I P LPAR B LPAR C J C A 1.0 Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards
  • 46. Open Database Environment LPAR A z/OS Distributed J C A 1.0 T C P I P WebSphere IMS DB CTL IMS PC S O A P IIOP Evolution PC LPAR B LPAR C ODBM Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards S C I O D B A WAS z/OS T C P I P S C I J C A 1.0
  • 47. Open Database Environment LPAR A z/OS IMS DB CTL IMS PC Distributed Universal DB Resource Adapter J C A 1.5 T C P I P WebSphere S O A P Evolution LPAR B LPAR C XCF TCP/IP ODBM Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards IMS Connect T C P I P S C I S C I O D B A
  • 48. Open Database Environment Universal DB Resource Adapter J C A 1.5 T C P I P WAS on Any Platform S O A P LPAR A z/OS Distributed LPAR C IMS DB CTL IMS PC S C I O D B A IMS 11 Solutions TCP/IP TCP/IP IMS Universal Drivers LPAR A IMS DB CTL IMS PC S C I O D B A ODBM ODBM ODBM LPAR B XCF JEE Non-JEE Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards DLI JDBC RYO DRDA Appl. IMS DB CTL IMS PC S C I O D B A IMS Connect T C P I P S C I z/OS WAS Universal DB Resource Adapter J C A 1.5 T C P I P O D B A PC S C I Traditional ODBA DLI JDBC IMS Universal Drivers Traditional ODBA
  • 49. Solution Highlights
    • Three Universal drivers
      • Universal DB resource adapter
        • JCA 1.5
      • Universal JDBC driver
      • Universal DLI driver
    • Distributed access
      • Universal drivers support type 4 connectivity to IMS databases from TCP/IP enabled platforms and runtimes
        • Windows
        • zLinux
        • z/OS
        • WebSphere Application Server
        • Standalone Java SE
      • Resource Recovery Services (RRS) is NOT required if applications do not require distributed two phase commit
    • Local access
      • Requirement for Universal drivers to support type 2 connectivity to IMS databases from z/OS runtimes
        • WebSphere Application Server for z/OS
        • IMS Java dependent regions
        • CICS
        • DB2 z/OS stored procedures
  • 50. Solution highlights – local connectivity
    • Local connectivity
      • Universal drivers will support type 2 connectivity to IMS databases from z/OS runtimes
        • WebSphere Application Server for z/OS
        • IMS Java dependent regions
        • CICS
        • DB2 z/OS stored procedures
      • All environments zAAP eligible
        • Future consideration
          • Extended zAAP offload
  • 51. Solution highlights - JDBC
    • The two Universal drivers for JDBC - IMS Universal DB Resource Adapter and IMS Universal JDBC Driver - offer a greatly enhanced JDBC implementation
      • JDBC 3.0
      • Local commit/rollback support
      • Standard SQL implementation for the SQL subset supported
        • Keys of parent segments are included in table as foreign keys
          • Allows Standard SQL implementation
      • Updatable result sets
      • Metadata discovery API implementation
        • Uses metadata generated by DLIModel Utility as “catalog data”
        • Enables JDBC tooling to work with IMS DBs just as they do with DB2 DBs
    Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards
  • 52. IMS Open Database
    • Comparison of programming approaches for accessing IMS:
    Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards Scenario Accessing IMS data through TCP/IP from a non-Java application that resides on a distributed non-z/OS platform or a z/OS platform that is on a different LPAR from the IMS subsystem. Accessing IMS data through TCP/IP from a Java application (non-J2EE) that resides on a distributed non-z/OS platform or a z/OS platform that is on a different LPAR from the IMS subsystem. Accessing IMS data through TCP/IP from a J2EE application that resides on a distributed non-z/OS platform or a z/OS platform that is on a different LPAR from the IMS subsystem. Approach Use your language of choice to issue DRDA DDM commands Use the type-4 JDBC driver or the DL/I for Java API Use the JCA 1.5-compliant IMS distributed DB resource adapter
  • 53. Solution highlights - virtual foreign keys
    • Foreign keys
      • Referential constraint between two tables
        • Used to link information together and have linkage managed by the DBMS
      • Identifies a column (or set of columns) in one referencing table that refers to a column (or set of columns) in another referenced table
      • Columns in referencing table must be the primary key in the referenced table
      • Row in the referencing table cannot contain values that don’t exist in the referenced table
      • Cannot insert a row in a referencing table unless the column identified as the foreign key exists in the referenced table
        • Establishes a hierarchy in a relational database
    • Think IMS…cannot insert a dependent segment unless the parent segment exists
      • Virtually represent foreign keys in each segment which are comprised of keys of each parent segment
        • Fully integrate this into the metadata exposed via JDBC for tooling to consume
        • These fields actually do exist - in the key feedback area
          • Can be queried as part of an SQL query
          • Universal drivers don’t have to do anything additional to return them
          • For INSERT operations the VFKs are used to establish the correct position
            • Values aren’t actually inserted as they already exist in the database
  • 54. Solution highlights - XA
    • Distributed Syncpoint (global transaction) requires RRS on z/OS
    • Use of RRS with ODBM is optional
      • RRS=Y|N parm for ODBM start-up
        • If RRS=Y (also the default), ODBM will use the ODBA interface (i.e. AERTDLI)
        • If RRS=N, ODBM will use the DRA interface like CICS
          • Global transactions are not supported if RRS=N)
    LPAR A LPAR B z/OS Distributed J D B C T C P I P WAS IMS Connect T C P I P S O A P S C I Start UOW IMS DB IMS S C I O D B A ODBM RRS RRS Parent UOR Child Coordinated Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards
  • 55. Solution highlights – SQL query governance
    • Value
      • Offer a rules engine such that queries are as efficiently processed by IMS as possible
        • Offer customizable rules
    • Existing query governance
      • Cannot execute SQL queries that filter (search) results based on fields not defined in a DBD
      • Cannot execute SQL queries that join IMS segments that are not in the same hierarchic path
    • Additional SQL query governance candidates
      • Force key field usage at root levels
        • Customizable
      • Periodic commit processing (internal) during long running update processing
        • Customizable
      • Query explain
        • Given a query, indicate DLI call processing that will take place
  • 56. Solution highlights – database lock release
    • Distributed applications (even local applications) are not always well behaved when it comes to releasing database locks
      • Can negatively impact database concurrency
    • Universal drivers detect when an application no longer requires the database lock and will internally release the lock
      • ResultSet no longer active
        • Closed or end of data
      • Scroll insensitive result sets used
      • Aggregate queries used
      • Autocommit enabled
  • 57. Solution highlights – IMS Connect and ODBM
    • IMS Connect
      • TCP/IP endpoint for type 4 connectivity
      • Authentication engine for type 4 connectivity
      • Focal point for two phase commit for type 4 connectivity
      • Proxies one phase commit requests to ODBM
    • Open Database Manager (ODBM)
      • Processes type 4 database requests
      • Processes type 4 one phase commit requests
      • Authorization engine (via ODBA) for database access
      • Processes type 2 database requests when using ODBM compatibility for ODBA
        • Compatibility mode will allow ODBA to proxy requests to an ODBM address space on the same LPAR
  • 58. IMS DB Resource Adapter IMS JDR CICS DB2 LPAR A LPAR B z/OS IMS DB CTL IMS PC z/OS Universal Drivers TCP/IP IMS Connect S C I T C P I P IMS DB CTL IMS PC S C I O D B A S C I O D B A ODBM Innovative Improved Usability Open Standards J C A 1.5 T C P I P WebSphere S O A P DLI JDBC
  • 59. IMS Open Database – Performance Considerations The JDBC and SQL layer only adds approximately 5% overhead 4000 TPS vs. 3800 TPS Same language, Same platform, Different interface C) DIST JAVA DLI vs. DIST JAVA SQL System Z was approximately 2 times faster 4000 TPS vs. 7892 TPS Same call, Same language, Different platform B) DIST JAVA DLI vs. SysZ JAVA DLI Both COBOL & Java meets business requirements. 7892 TPS vs. 9980 TPS Same call, Same platform, Different language A) SysZ Java DLI vs. SysZ COBOL DLI Notes IBM SVL Lab Description Scenario
  • 60. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 61. IMS XML Database
    • View/map native IMS hierarchical data as XML documents
    • Allows the retrieval and storage of IMS Records as XML documents with no change to existing IMS databases
    • XML Evolution over XML Revolution
      • Run XML transactions concurrently with traditional workload
    XML Documents IMS Data book @year title seq price publisher choice author last first seq editor last first seq affiliation xs:date xs:string xs:string xs:string xs:string xs:string xs:string xs:string xs:decimal XML Schema TITLE PUBLISH FIRST LAST FIRST 0:oo 0:oo AUTH EDIT BOOK YEAR PRICE LAST AFFIL PCB: BIB21 IMS DBD
  • 62. IMS XML-DB Metadata
    • “ Natural” mapping between hierarchic XML data and hierarchic IMS database definitions.
    PSB DBD IMS DB definition <?xml version=&quot;1.0&quot; encoding=&quot;UTF-8&quot;?> <xsd:schema xmlns:xsd=&quot;http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema&quot; xmlns:ims=&quot;http://www.ibm.com/ims&quot; xmlns=&quot;http://www.ibm.com/ims/PSBName/PCBName&quot; targetNamespace=&quot;http://www.ibm.com/ims/PSBName/PCBName&quot; elementFormDefault=&quot;qualified&quot;> <xsd:annotation> <xsd:appinfo> <ims:DLI mode=&quot;store&quot; PSB=&quot;AUTPSB11&quot; PCB=&quot;AUTOLPCB&quot; dsg=&quot;DATASETG&quot; meanLength=&quot;1000&quot; numDocs=&quot;100&quot;/> </xsd:appinfo> </xsd:annotation> <xsd:element name=“A”> <xsd:complexType> <xsd:sequence> <xsd:element name=“field1&quot; type=&quot;xsd:int&quot;/> <xsd:element name=“field2&quot;> <xsd:simpleType> <xsd:restriction base=&quot;xsd:string&quot;> <xsd:maxLength value=&quot;30&quot;/> </xsd:restriction> … XML Schema mapping XML view of IMS data XML document definition DLIModel Utility DLIModel Utility
  • 63. XQuery support in IMS V10
    • Designed to address the querying of collections of XML data.
    • XQuery 1.0 became a W3C recommendation in Jan 2007
    • More natural fit for querying hierarchical data
    • Enables customers to leverage emerging standard skill set
    • Enhanced product and tooling integration
    • Immediately usable with no migration of existing IMS data
    Data Content Information as a Service
  • 64.
    • F OR: iterates through a sequence, bind variable to items
    • L ET: binds a variable to a sequence
    • W HERE: eliminates items of the iteration
    • O RDER BY: reorders items of the iteration
    • R ETURN: constructs query results
    XQuery FLWOR Expressions <bib> { for $b in /bib/book let $title := $b/title where $b/publisher = &quot;Addison-Wesley“ order by $b/@year return <book year=&quot;{ $b/@year }&quot;> { $title } </book> } </bib> <bib> <book year=“1992&quot;> <title>Advanced Programming in the Unix </book> <book year=“1994&quot;> <title>TCP/IP Illustrated</title> </book> </bib>
  • 65. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 66. IBM Mashup Center - Data as a service
    • Web 2.0 support for IMS data
      • Develop an IMS RESTful service/feed
        • Generate meta files from IMS DB
        • IMS Web 2.0 Editor in InfoSphere MashupHub
  • 67. Web 2.0 support for IMS Data (Mashup Center)
    • Enterprise Database Plugin
      • Allows users to create feeds from any Database that supports a JDBC driver
    • Supports the following databases:
      • DB2
      • Derby
      • IDS
      • IMS
      • Microsoft SQL
      • MySQL
      • Oracle
  • 68. Web 2.0 support for IMS Data (Mashup Center)
    • Features:
      • Support both managed and unmanaged connections
      • Can store connection profile information for reuse
  • 69. Web 2.0 support for IMS Data (Mashup Center)
    • Supports generating SQL queries via a GUI interface
  • 70. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Web 2.0
    • Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 71. Integration
    • IBM Mashup Center
      • Web 2.0, Data as a service
    • Data Source Explorer
      • IMS connectivity via Generic JDBC
      • Database exploration
      • View/Edit data
    • Data Project Explorer
      • SQL scripting
        • Graphical
        • Content assist
    • Cognos - requirement
      • Operational business intelligence and reporting
      • IMS Connectivity via Generic JDBC
  • 72. New Intelligence with System z , z/OS, … and IMS …
    • Demonstrate access to IMS databases assets from business intelligence offering
      • COGNOS as open, enterprise-class platform for PM and BI
      • IMS Databases as efficient hierarchical database manager hosting enterprise production data
    COGNOS B InfoSphere Classic Federation Server z/OS InfoSphere Federation Server Linux on System z D IMS Database Manager IMS API How do I access information scattered in disparate data sources? IMS Connect + ODBM IMS Universal JDBC driver ODBC planned
  • 73. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB (IMS V7)
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases (IMS V?)
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 74. IMS Enterprise Suite 1.1 – Business Value Provided
    • Solution Statement
      • IMS Enterprise Suite is a single product offering that provides
        • Consistent installation and service process for select IMS SOA offerings,
        • Means for isolating offerings that contain open source.
    • Business Value
      • Part of IMS simplification strategy – simplifies installation and maintenance of select IMS SOA offerings
      • First step in helping customers improve their development productivity by shifting focus from maintenance to application development.
    • Challenge Addressed
      • Several components require open source code which customers have to personally obtain and keep isolated from their IMS systems and other high value, business critical systems
  • 75.
    • General Availability Nov 6, 2009
    • IMS Enterprise Suite 1.1 components:
      • SOAP Gateway
      • Connect API for C
      • Connect API for Java
      • DLIModel Utility Plug-in
      • JMS API
    IMS Enterprise Suite 1.1 – Solution Highlights
  • 76.
    • Two ways to install any IMS Enterprise Suite 1.1 feature:
      • SMP/E install for z/OS environment
        • No longer need to download and install from website
      • Installation Manager for distributed platforms
        • Easy-to-use tool for managing installation and updates
    IMS Enterprise Suite 1.1 – Installation
  • 77.
    • Graphical User Interface (GUI)
      • Leverage Eclipse, Eclipse Modeling Framework (EMF) and Graphical Editor Framework (GEF)
      • Can be installed as a stand-alone function or on top of other Eclipse based products (i.e. RAD 7.5, RDz 7.5, Data Studio) using IBM Installation Manager
    • IMS Database Visualization Tool
      • User can visualize an entire IMS PSB and DBD in a multi-page graphical editor.
        • Each PCB can be viewed, saved and printed individually. Each PCB editor shows the IMS DB hierarchy with the segments, fields, field types, etc.
      • User can also search an entire IMS PSB for a specific PCB, segment, or field.
    IMS Enterprise Suite 1.1: DLIModel Utility Plug-in
  • 78. DLIDatabaseView IMS Java Metadata DLI Database View package samples.dealership; import com.ibm.ims.db.*; import com.ibm.ims.base.*; public class AUTPSB11DatabaseView extends DLIDatabaseView { // The following DLITypeInfo[] array describes Segment: DEALER in PCB: AUTOLPCB static DLITypeInfo[] AUTOLPCBDEALERArray= { new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerNo&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 1 , 4 , &quot;DLRNO&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerName&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 5 , 30 , &quot;DLRNAME&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerCity&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 35 , 10 , &quot;CITY&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerZip&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 45 , 10 , &quot;ZIP&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerPhone&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 55 , 7 , &quot;PHONE&quot; ) }; static DLISegment AUTOLPCBDEALERSegment= new DLISegment ( &quot;DealerSegment&quot; , &quot;DEALER&quot; ,AUTOLPCBDEALERArray, 61 ); ... // An array of DLISegmentInfo objects follows to describe the view for PCB: AUTOLPCB static DLISegmentInfo[] AUTOLPCBarray = { new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBDEALERSegment,DLIDatabaseView.ROOT), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBMODELSegment, 0 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBORDERSegment, 1 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSALESSegment, 1 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSTOCKSegment, 1 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSTOCSALESegment, 4 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSALESINFSegment, 5 ) }; ... } PSB DBD
  • 79. DLI Model Utility - Database Visualization
    • UML View of the Database Metadata
  • 80. IMS DLIModel Utility PSB DBD DLIModel Utility interface IMS Java Metadata classes package samples.dealership; import com.ibm.ims.db.*; import com.ibm.ims.base.*; public class AUTPSB11DatabaseView extends DLIDatabaseView { // The following DLITypeInfo[] array describes Segment: DEALER in PCB: AUTOLPCB static DLITypeInfo[] AUTOLPCBDEALERArray= { new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerNo&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 1 , 4 , &quot;DLRNO&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerName&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 5 , 30 , &quot;DLRNAME&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerCity&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 35 , 10 , &quot;CITY&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerZip&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 45 , 10 , &quot;ZIP&quot; ), new DLITypeInfo ( &quot;DealerPhone&quot; , DLITypeInfo.CHAR, 55 , 7 , &quot;PHONE&quot; ) }; static DLISegment AUTOLPCBDEALERSegment= new DLISegment ( &quot;DealerSegment&quot; , &quot;DEALER&quot; ,AUTOLPCBDEALERArray, 61 ); ... // An array of DLISegmentInfo objects follows to describe the view for PCB: AUTOLPCB static DLISegmentInfo[] AUTOLPCBarray = { new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBDEALERSegment,DLIDatabaseView.ROOT), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBMODELSegment, 0 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBORDERSegment, 1 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSALESSegment, 1 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSTOCKSegment, 1 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSTOCSALESegment, 4 ), new DLISegmentInfo (AUTOLPCBSALESINFSegment, 5 ) }; ... } XML schemas COBOL copybook members
  • 81. Enterprise Suite DLIModel Utility Enterprise Suite DLIModel Utility interface EAR WebSphere z/OS IMS DLI commands INSERT UPDATE DELETE RETRIEVE
    • Types
    • Interface
    • Binding
    • Service
    WSDL
  • 82. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB (IMS V7)
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases (IMS V?)
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 83. IMS Database Tools
    • IMS Hardware Data Compression Extended
    • Fast Path Basic Tools
      • DEDB Pointer Checker
      • DEDB Tuning Aid
      • DEDB Unload/Reload
    • Fast Path Online Tools
      • Online Pointer Checker
      • Online Data Extract
      • Online Area Extender
    • IMS Buffer Pool Analyzer
    • HALDB Conversion and Maintenance Aid
    • IMS Database Repair Facility
    • IMS DEDB Fast Recovery
    • IMS Database Recovery Facility
      • follow-on product to ORS
    • IMS Database Control Suite
    • High Performance Unload
    • High Performance Load
    • IMS Index Builder
    • IMS High Performance Prefix Resolution
    • IMS Parallel Reorganization
    • IMS Image Copy Extensions
    • IMS High Performance Change Accumulation
    • High Performance Pointer Checker
      • HD Pointer Checker
      • HD Tuning Aid
      • DB Segment Restructure
      • Space Monitor
      • DB Historical Data Analyzer
    • IMS Library Integrity Utilities
      • DBD/PSB/ACB Compare
      • DBD/PSB/ACB Mapper
      • DBD/PSB/ACB Reversal
      • Advanced ACB Generator
  • 84. IMS Tools Product Portfolio © 2009 IBM Corporation Batch Terminal Simulator Batch Backout Manager IMS Connect Extensions Program Restart Facility IMS Audit Management Expert IBM Data Encryption for IMS and DB2 Databases
    • IMS Cloning Tool
    • IMS Database Control Suite
    • High Performance Fast Path Utilities
    • High Performance Unload
    • High Performance Load
    • IMS Index Builder
    • High Performance Prefix Resolution
    • Parallel Reorganization
    • Online Reorganization Facility
    • High Performance Pointer Checker
    • Database Control Suite
    • Command Control Facility
    • ETO Support
    • HP Sysgen Tools
    • Queue Control Facility
    • IMS Workload Router
    IMS Recovery Expert Database Recovery Facility High Perf Image Copy High Perf Change Accumulation DEDB Fast Recovery IMS Parameter Manager IMS Sysplex Manager HALDB Toolkit HD Compression- Extended Library Integrity Utilities Sequential Randomizer Generator IMS Tools Knowledge Base Buffer Pool Analyzer Network Compression Facility Performance Analyzer Problem Investigator OMEGAMON XE for IMS Utility Management Backup and Recovery End to End Management Performance Management IMS DATA BASE TOOLS Application Management Transaction Management Data Base Administration Regulatory Compliance System Administration © 2009 IBM Corporation
  • 85. IMS Tools Solution Packs – From IMS Tools Lab
    • Related products packaged together to provide end-to-end IMS solutions
      • Combined Install
      • Increased Integration
      • Simplified Maintenance
    • Lay the foundation for new IMS Tools in the pipeline via a nocharge Base Pack which contains necessary common code (Generic Exits, DAI, ITKB, etc.)
    • Complete Solutions Designed to…
    Reduce CPU Consumption Reduce DBA Labor Costs
      • Eliminate Application Downtime
    + + = Deliver faster return on your investment IMS Recovery Solution Pack IMS Database Solution Pack IMS Performance Solution Pack IMS Fast Path Solution Pack IMS Tools Base
  • 86. IMS Tools Solution Packs …
    • IMS Tools Base for z/OS (5655-V93) – No Charge
      • IMS Tools Knowledge Base
      • IMS Hardware Data Compression Extended
      • IMS Tools Generic Exits
      • IMS Tools Online System Interface (TOSI)
      • Policy Services
      • Distributed Access Infrastructure (preview)
    • IMS Database Solution Pack for z/OS (5655S77)
      • IMS Parallel Reorganization renamed DB Reorg Expert
      • IMS HP Load
      • IMS HP Unload
      • IMS HP Pointer Checker including DB Repair Facility
      • IMS HP Prefix Resolution
      • IMS Index Builder
      • IMS Library Integrity Utilities
      • IMS HP Image Copy
    Replacement for IMS Parallel Reorg V3 5655M28 IMS Library Integrity Utilities V2 5655U08 IMS Index Builder V3 5655R01 IMS HP Unload V1 5655E06 IMS HP Prefix Resolution V3 5655M27 IMS HP Pointer Checker V3 5655U09 IMS HP Load V2 5655M26 IMS HP Image Copy V4 5655N45 Replacement for IMS Tools Knowledge Base 5655R34 IMS HD Comp Extended V2 5655E02
  • 87. IMS Tools Solution Packs …
    • IMS Performance Solution Pack (5655-S42)
      • IMS Connect Extensions
      • IMS Performance Analyzer
      • IMS Problem Investigator
    • IMS FastPath Solution Pack ( 5655-W14)
      • IMS HP FP Utilities (load, unload, PC, etc)
      • IMS HP Image Copy
      • IMS Library Integrity Utilities
      • IMS DB Repair
    • IMS Recovery Solution Pack (5655-V86)
      • IMS Recovery Expert
      • IMS Database Recovery Facility
      • IMS HP Change Accum
      • IMS HP Image Copy
      • IMS Index Builder
    Replacement for IMS Recovery Expert 5655R26 IMS Index Builder V3 5655R01 IMS HP Image Copy V4 5655N45 IMS HP Change Accum V1 5655F59 IMS DB Recovery Facility V3 5655N47 IMS Libr Integrity Utils V2 5655U08 IMS HP Image Copy V4 5655N45 IMS HP FP Utilities V3 5655R05 IMS Database Repair V1 5655E03 Replacement for Replacement for IMS Problem Investigator V2 5655R02 IMS Performance Analyzer V4 5655R03 IMS Connect Extensions V2 5655S56
  • 88. IMS Links with IBM Strategy for Smarter Planet “ Data is exploding and it’s in silos” I Need Insight “ Our resources are limited” I Need Efficiency “ New business and process demands” I Need to Work Smart “ My infrastructure is inflexible and costly” I Need to Respond Quickly NEW INTELLIGENCE GREEN & BEYOND SMART WORK DYNAMIC INFRASTRUCTURE DB2 Optim WAS* ILOG Rational Tivoli z/OS Parallel Sysplex RACF WLM … Datapower System z Data Compres. IMS integrated in IBM Strategy with … Cognos . . . De-duplication InfoSphere Classic Fed. & EP Cope GT Software Syspertec Metrixware / Scort Softbase
  • 89. IMS Value
    • IMS is Efficient: 22K trans/sec on a single eight way z9. Remarkable performance that translates to the most cost efficient run-time environment. Reusing IMS transactions and data saves money.
    • IMS enables Growth: IMS SOA provides Open, standard interfaces allowing ‘any-to-any’ connectivity and access for new applications.
    • IMS supports Growth: with IMS scalability you can just keep on growing. Customers have routinely handled peaks of 100 million transactions in a day.
    • IMS is Resilient: Customers report going thousands of days without an unplanned outage. One bank reports availability of 99.998% over 10 years, 1.5 hours for planned outages.
    • IMS and z/OS are secure
    • Most efficient run-time, maintains application investment protection
    • Fully integrated into today’s AD toolsets
    • Fully integrates with WebSphere Application Server/ ESB / Process Server
    • Fully supports SOA
    • Improved efficiency and reduced skill requirements for systems and development staff
    • Flexibility: JAVA, COBOL, C, PL/I, XML, Web 2.0…
    • Continuous improvement to Rock solid availability
    • Continuous improvement to operations and serviceability tools
    • Fully supported by IMS & Tivoli tools
    IMS “Value Proposition” 40+ years of Continuous Core Systems Improvement Resilience Growth Efficiency
  • 90. IMS DB in Perspective
    • High performance database manager
      • Integrated with IMS Transaction Manager for higher throughput
      • Used with both CICS or IMS TM by largest workload WW
      • Accessible by DB2 Stored Procedures and WAS on z/OS
      • Accessible any distributed environment with IMS 11 & Open Database
      • Basic free utilities for reorganization and recovery – IBM Tools for enhanced capabilities
    • Intrinsic qualities
      • Hierarchical design
      • Accessible thru IMS DLI API with many languages or thru JDBC API for Java applications
      • Performance without CPU consumption
      • Unlimited capacity and high availability by design with IMS partitioned DB (HALDB)
    • Very integrated with z/OS to provide best Quality Of Service
      • RRS, ARM, Security server, …
      • Efficient parallel sysplex support with IMS data sharing
  • 91. IMS DB in Perspective … Yes, We Can!!! COGNOS Operational Business Intelligence InfoSphere Classic Data Event Publisher Publication of DB Changes InfoSphere Classic Replication Server Replication InfoSphere Classic Federation Data Federation InfoSphere Family Information Integration OPTIM Family Creating Test databases OPTIM Family Anonymisation of databases IMS Tools Audit for every access IMS Tools Compression and Encryption   Data Governance IMS Tools Reorganization for better performance IMS Tools Backup and Recovery Advanced Solutions Pointer validation & repair Health Check DFSMS family Advanced Space Management Capabilities   Data Management IMS 11 Open Database Open Access and Data Integration IMS Java Java SQL support (JDBC) COBOL, PLI, C, … JAVA Multi-language AD support   Application Development 1/2 the MIPS and 1/2 the DASD of relational Performance without CPU extra cost IMS Data Sharing High Availability HALDB & DEDB High Capacity   Native Quality of Services
  • 92. Agenda
    • Intro to IMS DB
      • Architecture
      • Hierarchic structure
      • Access methods
    • HALDB (IMS V7)
      • What is it?
      • Reorg
    • Shared Databases (IMS V?)
    • Database Quiesce (IMS 11)
    • ODBA (IMS V6)
    • IMS Open Database (IMS 11)
    • XML
      • XML DB (IMS V9)
      • XQuery IMS V10)
    • Product Integration
      • Mashup Center
      • DataSource Explorer
      • Data Project Explorer
      • Cognos
    • Enterprise Suite
    • Explorer
    • Tools
    • Certification & Training
  • 93. http://www.idcp.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=74&Itemid=74
    • Unique Enterprise Systems Certificate programs from Marist College and IBM
  • 94. The Message
    • IMS continues to be a premier server with architected standard interfaces
      • New products and tools from a variety of vendors provide access to IMS transactions and data
    • SOA is revolutionizing the way businesses are being designed and run. For it to make sense:
      • All assets must be easily accessible in a standard way
      • All data must be represented and manipulated in a standard way
    • Our goal is to leverage IMS Database Manager as an integral part of the enterprise in the evolving business world through
      • Addition of support for complimentary standards surrounding IMS data connectivity, data representation, and application development
    • And to allow you to realize the promises of building a Service Oriented Architecture:
      • Simplify the business environment
      • Respond to market changes more quickly and cheaply
  • 95. Grow your IMS Business and Protect Investment
    • How to add new or expand existing IMS applications and IMS data?
      • Target LOB applications architects & management
        • Today awareness of “SOA-ing” IMS applications with this audience is nil
      • Publicize success stories internally
    • Back to IMS and z/OS basics messages
      • Superior performance, bulletproof reliability
      • Don’t risk your business by moving off IMS
      • Value proposition:
        • Growing transaction workload grows your revenue!
        • More gateway on the LOB business logic and business data
        • Drive demand for new function, justify V to V upgrades
  • 96. For more information
    • IMS Family Web site:
      • ibm.com/ims
      • IMS Version 9 has been Withdrawn from Marketing on 7th September 2009
        • See Announcement Letter ZP09-0212 issued 2nd June 2009
      • IMS Version 9 will be Withdrawn from Service on 7th November 2010
        • See Announcement Letter ZP09-0318 issued 4th August 2009
    • z Journal reports on IMS: Exciting Future Still Ahead – 09/2009
      • http:// www.zjournal.com/index.cfm?section = article&aid =1225
  • 97.