Libraries support staff development

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This session will focus on the dilemmas and challenges of providing effective leadership skills for modern schools with digital ICT capabilities. It will review the selected challenges of engaging different generations of staff in ICT based learning and recommend strategies for effective leadership of ICT based schools. It will particularly focus on the issues of how a teacher-librarian and a library can assist to provide relevance and appropriateness of ICT based proposals and programs, and suggest ways to implement leadership policies which enable senior staff to remain accountable whilst all the changes enabled by ICT based learning are occurring within a school.

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Libraries support staff development

  1. 1. Diversity Challenge Resilience SCHOOL LIBRARIES IN ACTION Supporting the Digital Education Agenda Libraries Supporting Staff Development:- Applying Risk Management Principles To Education and Training Diversity Challenge Resilience: School Libraries in Action - The 12th Biennial School Library Association of Queensland, the 39th International Association of School Librarianship Annual Conference incorporating the 14th International Forum on Research in School Librarianship, Brisbane, QLD Australia, 27 September – 1 October 2010. 1 PROFESSOR MICHAEL HOUGH.SEP 10
  2. 2. AN OBSERVATION Black (2008,32) reviewed the recent Australian research on teachers’ use of technology across three Australian education sectors. He noted that: “Technology is still an ‘innovation’ rather than a mainstream activity; the most important additional investment needs to be in teachers- to provide the support and professional learning that enables teachers to embed technology into their practices ….Time to learn is the greatest barrier.” 2 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  3. 3. SOME USEFUL MINDSETS A TYPOLOGY OF STAFF DEVELOPMENT A FRAMEWORK OF DEVELOPING SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND THE VALUE ADDED USAGES OF I.C.T. A RISK MANAGEMENT APPROACH TO TRAINING 3 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  4. 4. A STAFF DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK Ref:- Joyce ( 1996/7) 4 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  5. 5. CLASSROOM TYPE I.C.T. SUPPORT AND ADVICE REQUIREMENTS TYPICAL UPDATE ISSUES How To Work Effectively With A Web Based Learning System E.G. WebCT / TopClass for both self learning and class / group learning How To Use Web 2.0 Systems To Support Meaningful Learning E.G. Facebook/ Twitter / Wikis / Blogs / Sliderocket/ Slideshare/ Prezi / Moodle / 2nd Life Use of support software e.g. Studywiz / Protopage How to use new learning options e.g. e-Books / e-readers / How to use Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy
  6. 6. Some I Centre Support Issues-1 ICT Support /Advice Role Location of ICT Help Desk and Support Services Physical Hub of I.C.T. Resources Virtual Hub of I.C.T. Resources Staff Development and Training Resource
  7. 7. BUSINESS IS USING WEB 2.0! For an example of an Australian small business initiative on how to use moodle go to:- http://lms.demo.microsolve.com.au. Microsolve is a Wollongong I.C.T. support business that offers an illustratory ‘moodle’ learning website for education e.g. high schools, as well as businesses to use
  8. 8. Some I Centre Support Issues-2 eLearning Policy and Support Centre Provides access a wide range of eLearning Tools and Resources (e.g. see Hay, 2010, Ch 9) Provides Training and Advice to Staff and Users-see useful eLearning resources listed in Finger & Jamieson-Proctor (2010, 226-227) Improve the Digital learning Capabilities-see in particular Hay (2010,145) for a summary of a 2008 research report on the information behaviour of young people, and a list of at least 10 areas of problems and weaknesses in them as information users Maher & Lee (2010) analyse student internet usage patterns, together with the challenges and policies recommended to deal with these issues in a supportive way.
  9. 9. Some I Centre Support issues-3 Major eLearning Assets Either on a ‘stand alone’ (i.e. one iCentre per school), or as part of a wider iCentre network, to provide what Hay 2010, 163 describes as:- “ Online Information services” and ‘learning through information’ scaffolds. Hay also provides a detailed example of 12 assets and services that could constitute appropriate eLearning services and scaffolds.
  10. 10. DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP ENHANCING THE LEARNING OF YOUNGER GENERATION LEARNERS / TEACHERS AND PARENTS DEVELOPING LEADERSHIP CAPABILITIES BASED ON EMOTIONAL AND MORAL INTELLIGENCE UNDERSTANDINGS AND CAPABILITIES ACTIVATING PARTNERSHIPS WITHIN AND BETWEEN SCHOOLS AND THEIR EXTERNAL AND INTERNAL COMMUNITIES 10 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  11. 11. NEW ROLES For School Leaders LODERING-Norse/Danish Term Lindisfarne MENAGERING-French Army Term Ellyard:- “Australia is over managed and under led” We need LODERERS not MENAGERERS 11 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  12. 12. BUILDING CAPACITY- LEADERSHIP THE LIBRARIAN AS C.I.O. The C.I.O. Role Senior Leadership Role on School Executive:- Particular Focus of Expertise:- Developments and Changes in ICT Based learning Options and Leadership On All Policies Affected by ICT Capabilities Responsible For ICT Policies:- Hardware / Software / Move toWireless / Cloud Computing / PDA’s / Cyber Safety/ Digital Citizenship/ Legal Conformance Responsible For Information Security:- School Accreditation to relevant ISO Standards / Cybersafety / Security of School Information / Access Policies / *Responsible For Environmental Scanning on Behalf of School Exec For ICT based developments Responsibility for maintaining awareness of new trends and capabilities in Digital Learning and ICT based technologies/ Advice and Staff Development for the school 12 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  13. 13. Some C.I.O. Leadership Tasks The Librarian As Chief Information Officer (CIO) Lee (2010, Ch 3) suggests the CIO should provide leadership to ensure that the following requirements can be met:- High levels of availability of digital technology across school functions Adequate deployment of the Technology into Classrooms Actual Usage of the Technology by Teachers and students in Classrooms Access to Online learning Platforms (see Becta for example) The conditions for normalised teacher and student usage are met (see Lee, 2010, 44) Teacher Training and Support- especially ease of usage in the ‘normal’ teaching classroom Relevance and Availability of the Technology for example the success and take-up of use the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) Infrastructure Finance –see Lee (2010) for a compelling argument that the home is the much greater investment point for student accessible ICT capability, and schools should accept this and learn how to network with these capabilities as a ‘normal’ relationship Leadership Implementation Bureaucratic and Hierarchical Control Administration and Communication –especially level of compatability with eLearning systems Impact of the Major Technology Corporations (e.g. Dell Apple Microsoft)
  14. 14. Situational Leadership ADOPTING THE APPROPRIATE LEADERSHIP ROLE AND ACTION(S) FOR EACH PARTICULAR SITUATION, AND THE OUTCOME(S) SOUGHT OR REQUIRED 14 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  15. 15. A SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP MODEL INTEGRAL LEADERSHIP:- A 4 QUADRANT MODEL OF SPIRIT, HEAD, HANDS AND HEART BY RON CACCIOPE OF W.A. 15 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  16. 16. INTEGRAL LEADERSHIP:- 4 QUADRANT MODEL QUADRANT 1:-SPIRIT- (VALUES)-COMMUNITY & CULTURE QUADRANT 2:-HEART (FEELINGS)-PEOPLE WELL BEING QUADRANT 3:-HANDS (SKILLS)-EFFECTIVENESS QUADRANT 4:-HEAD ( LOGIC)-EFFICIENCY Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 16 2010
  17. 17. 17 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  18. 18. A SITUATIONAL LEADERSHIP MODEL:- SELECTING I.C.T. AS A POSITIVE ENHANCER OF SCHOOL PERFORMANCE See Session Handout pp 5-8 Tables 1-4 EACH QUADRANT IDENTIFIES THE ROLE(S) FOR I.C.T. IN ENHANCING THIS SITUATIONAL REQUIREMENT AND OUTCOME 18 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
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  20. 20. 20 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
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  22. 22. Why a Risk Based Approach? Three Action Recommendations: School Librarians and School iCentres need to become central agencies in the staff development upgrades of staff, students and parents as the networked learning community emerges iCentres should promote adaptive staff development which must be developed using “targeting” techniques such as risk management applied to staff development choices, if the wide range of challenges and needs is to be met in upgrading teachers and leaders in our schools Librarians need to exert a leadership role in the I.C.T. support of teachers and leaders by developing into the Chief Information Officer (CIO) Role- a role which will require them to remain current in the developing technologies and recommended options, to provide effective leadership in selecting wisely from I.C.T. options and usages, and be available to ‘project manage’ and ‘house’ the actual approaches developed
  23. 23. RISK MANAGEMENT The benefits of using a Risk Management Approach include but are not limited to:- * Increased likelihood of achieving objectives * Encouraging proactive management * Improved identification of opportunity and threats * Complying with legislative requirements * Improved financial reporting * Improve governance * Improved stakeholder confidence and trust * Improve controls by management * More effective allocation of resources 23 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  24. 24. R.M. and Training In essence the risk management approach requires considered answers to the risks involved in educator’s answers to the following key questions:- What Item (S) Must Be Taught? What Level (S) Of Achievement Is Acceptable? How Can We Justify Our Choices In Selecting Or Rejecting Items To Be Included And Taught? How Do We Know That They Have Been Taught To An Acceptable Level Of Achievement By The Learner (s) Have We Minimised Risk In Selecting Answers To Their Above Key Questions? 24 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  25. 25. The Basic Risk Management Logic ISO 13001:-The basic risk management matrix is a simple two-way analysis table-which enables level of risk to be matched against level of consequence. The extremes of a simple risk management matrix then become:- High Risk + High Consequence High Risk + Low Consequence Low Risk + High Consequence Low Risk + Low Consequence. 25 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  26. 26. So One method of deciding which staff development options should be priorities for implementation, and to what level(s) should they be achieved? Deciding which of the leadership functions should be initially supported by I.C.T., and to what level(s)? Is to use the Risk Management approach as follows:- 26 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  27. 27. 27 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  28. 28. RISK IN CURRICULUM CHOICE ITEM TO BE ACHIEVED e.g. TEACHER SD RISK LEVELS JOB IMBEDDDED ITEMS 1- ? FOR EACH ONE A RATING OF: R1-High Risk + High Consequence R2-High Risk + Low Consequence R3-Low Risk + High Consequence R4-Low Risk + Low Consequence JOB RELATED ITEMS 1-? E.G. JR1- R1 / JR2-R3 / JR3-R2 ETC EMPLOYMENT SYSTEM RELATED 1-? E.G. CAREER / PROFESSION RELATED 1 -? E.G. SELF DIRECTED 1-? E.G. OTHER? E.G. EACH ITEM NEEDS TO THEN BE CATEGORISED The levels are: AS A REQUIRED LEVEL Essential Knowledge Important Knowledge Basic knowledge Associated knowledge 28 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  29. 29. ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE THE R.M. APPROACH ESSENTIALLY USES RISK LOGIC TO WORK THROUGH AND DECIDE:- Levels of knowledge for use in the matrix table hierarchy. The levels are: Essential Knowledge Important Knowledge Basic knowledge Associated knowledge 29 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  30. 30. ASSESSING RISK IN TEACHING APPROACHES TYPES OF TEACHING- EXAMPLES CONSEQUENCES AND RISKS INVOLVED MAX CLASS TIME WITH EXPERIENCED SENIOR ASSIMILATION OF SUBJECT MATTER BY ALL TEACHER STUDENTS , MOST COSTLY APPROACH. NO DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS LIKELY MIN CLASS TIME WITH JUNIOR TEACHER ASSIMILATION OF SUBJECT MATTER BY BETTER / INTERESTED STUDENTS POOR ASSIMILATION BY AVERAGE STUDENTS MIN CLASS TIME WITH NON SUBJECT / AREA ASSIMILATION OF SUBJECT MATTER BY ONLY BEST QUALIFIED TEACHER STUDENTS .LIKELY DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS AND PARENT COMPLAINTS ABOUT POOR LEARNING PROVIDE GUIDANCE NOTES NO CLASS TIME LIKELY WORKABLE METHOD FOR VERY BRIGHT, ALLOCATED MOTIVATED STUDENTS WITH HIGH ACHIEVEMENT GOALS. UNLIKELY TO GAIN SUCCESS WITH NON MOTIVATED STUDENTS CHEAP TO RUN OVER TIME REFER TO OTHER COURSES WHICH A STUDENT ? COULD CHOOSE TO EXPERIENCE AND LEARN FROM PUT UP A LIST OF REFERENCES AND USEFUL ? SOURCES DELIBERATELY IGNORE ? 30 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  31. 31. ASSESSING RISK IN ASSESSMENT APPROACHES ASSESSMENT TECHNIQUE / APPROACH LIKELY ACTUAL OUTCOME + RISK FULL ASSESSMENT OF EVERY LEARNING HIGHLY EXPENSIVE AND TIME OUTCOME EVERY TIME, ON AN CONSUMING BUT GUARANTEES? THAT INDIVIDUAL STUDENT BASIS, BY OUTCOME CLAIMED IS VALID EXTERNAL ASSESSORS FULL ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING LESS EXPENSIVE AND STILL GIVES HIGH OUTCOMES ON A GROUP BASIS BY LEVEL OF REASSURANCE BUT MORE EXTERNAL ASSESSORS RISK PARTIAL ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING RAISES RISK LEVELS THAT WHAT IS OUTCOMES BY EXTERNAL ASSESSORS CLAIMED TO BE LEARNED ACTUALLY HAS BEEN ANY OF THE ABOVE APPROACHES, BUT RAISES THE RISK THAT RESULTS NOT BY INTERNAL ASSESSORS SEEN AS VALID AS EXTERNAL ASSESSMENTS PEER OR SELF ASSESSMENT ? NO ASSESSMENT Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010 ? 31
  32. 32. SO A RISK ASSESSMENT OF TRAINING APPROACH WHAT IS THE RISK IN THE WAY YOU HAVE RANKED OUTCOMES FOR ACHIEVEMENT? WHAT IS THE RISK IN THE TEACHING METHOD YOU HAVE ASSIGNED TO ACHIEVE AN OUTCOME? WHAT IS THE RISK IN THE ASSESSMENT METHOD YOU THEN ADD TO THE TEACHING SELECTED? 32 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  33. 33. IN A MYSPACE DATE APPROACH WOULD AN AUDIT TRAIL OF EVIDENCE OF THE RISK BASED DECISIONS ANALYSED AND THEN TAKEN PROVIDE REASSURANCE AND COMFORT TO THOSE ASSESSING YOUR SCHOOL? 33 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  34. 34. PERCEIVED BENEFITS Some of the benefits of a risk management approach to training are as follows: Improved Effectiveness Of Training Decisions Taken More Thoughtfully Improved cost effectiveness of training Improved allocation of training resources Optimising of training efforts towards important and relevant outcomes Ensuring appropriate knowledge is included in training Ability to demonstrate to internal and external stakeholders fair and equitable training decisions Minimisation of organisational legal risks - especially in relation to any statutory training requirements Ensuring staff Occupational Health and Safety risks are minimised ? 34 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  35. 35. FINAL COMMENTS-1 This is a very promising methodology and you are invited to work with Barry Horton and myself in developing this approach further 35 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010
  36. 36. Remember Three key learnings: Librarians need to actively promote their role as Chief Information Officer and influence the leadership of the school School Libraries need to evolve into iCentre(s)- which houses the knowledge-based resources essential to modern learning and schooling. The iCentre will need to provide students and staff with a ‘one stop shop’ for all resourcing of, technology and learning needs on a daily basis.
  37. 37. THANK YOU mhough5@gmail.com 37 Professor Michael Hough.3. Sep 2010

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