Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
learning_environments
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

learning_environments

606
views

Published on

The full results from a 2008/2009 research study examining the application of a learning environment paradigm to the school library setting. Report the process of completing a comparative examination …

The full results from a 2008/2009 research study examining the application of a learning environment paradigm to the school library setting. Report the process of completing a comparative examination of the relationships among student perceptions of science programs and library programs with Third (ages 8 and 9), Fourth (ages 9 and 10) and Fifth (ages 10 and 11) Grades.

Published in: Education

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
606
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Assessing School Libraries as Learning Environments: Examining Students’ Perceptions in Third, Fourth and Fifth GradesThird, Fourth and Fifth Grades Barbara A. Schultz-Jones, Ph.D. University of North Texas Cynthia E. Ledbetter, Ph.D. University of Texas at Dallas IASL 39th Annual Conference, Brisbane, Australia
  • 2. Introduction • Previous studies show that both strong school library programs and positive learning environments contribute to high student outcomes. • Therefore, the role that a learning environment plays within the school library media centre is of interest. • “Learning environment refers to the social, psychological and• “Learning environment refers to the social, psychological and pedagogical contexts in which learning occurs and which affect student achievement and attitudes” (Fraser, 1998a, p.3). • This paper reports the full results of a 2008/2009 research study that examined the application of a learning environment paradigm to the school library setting. 9/28/2010 2Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter
  • 3. Learning Environment 9/28/2010 3Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter
  • 4. Background • School library media specialists (SLMS) and science teachers have complementary standards related to affecting student achievement. • Despite substantial efforts to document the• Despite substantial efforts to document the positive relationship between SLMSs and student achievement, any correlations between a strong school library media program and positive science achievement is, for the most part, unreported. 9/28/2010 4Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter
  • 5. Background • Evaluation of innovative classroom environments using My Class Inventory – Developed with a psychological view of learning that focused on students as co-constructors ofthat focused on students as co-constructors of their own knowledge – Uses a preferred and an actual form to assess dimensions of satisfaction, competition, friction, difficulty and cohesion 9/28/2010 5Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter
  • 6. Research Setting • School – K – 5 setting with a mathematics and pre- engineering integrated curriculum at each grade levellevel – Research and Design Center that functions as a combination library and centre for the delivery of a robotics program 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 6
  • 7. Participants • 176 students in Grades 3 – 5 were surveyed Table 1 Student demographics for Science Classes and R&D Center. 3-5th Grade Students in Science Class (n = 176) and 3-5th Grade Students in Center (n = 176) 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 7 3-5th Grade Students in Science Class (n = 176) and 3-5th Grade Students in Center (n = 176) Grade Male Female African American Asian Hispanic Native American Pacific Islander White Mixed 3 29 34 8 3 2 47 3 4 30 28 4 1 2 44 7 5 23 27 4 1 45 Total 82 89 16 2 5 2 136 10
  • 8. Instruments Table 2 Examples of the five scales from the MCI used to evaluate the learning environments of the R&D Centre and the Science Class MCI Science MCI Library Preferred Actual Preferred Actual Satisfaction In my science class the students would enjoy their schoolwork. The students enjoy their schoolwork in my class. Students would enjoy doing their schoolwork in the R&D centre. Students enjoy doing their schoolwork in the R&D centre. Friction In my science class students would be always fighting with Students are always fighting with each other. Students would always fight or argue with each other in the Students are always fighting with each other in the R&D 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 8 would be always fighting with each other. with each other. argue with each other in the R&D centre. with each other in the R&D centre. Competition In my science class students often would race to see who could finish first. Students often race to see who can finish first. Students would often race to see who can find things in the R&D Centre first. Students often race to see who can find things in the R&D Centre first. Difficulty In my science class the work would be hard to do. In my class the work is hard to do. In my R&D Centre finding different resources (such as books, magazines, CDs) would be hard to do. In my R&D Centre finding different resources (such as books, magazines, CDs) is hard to do. Cohesion In my science class everybody would be my friend. In my class everybody is my friend. In my R&D Centre everybody would be my friend. In my R&D Centre everybody is my friend.
  • 9. t-Test Analyses • Why do it? – To see if there is any difference in the averages of scoresscores – Tells us whether or not students perceptions are different from preferred to perceived (actual). 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 9
  • 10. t-Test Analyses • Results – 3rd Grade: • Prefer more friction in R&D Center than in the• Prefer more friction in R&D Center than in the classroom • Prefer more competition and difficulty in the science classroom 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 10
  • 11. t-Test Analyses • Results – 4th Grade: • Prefer more friction, competition and difficulty in R&D• Prefer more friction, competition and difficulty in R&D Center than in the science classroom • Perceive more satisfaction in the science classroom than in the R&D Center • Perceive more difficulty in the R&D Center than in the science classroom 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 11
  • 12. t-Test Analyses • Results – 5th Grade: • Prefer more friction in R&D Center than in the science• Prefer more friction in R&D Center than in the science classroom • Prefer more difficulty in the science classroom than in the R&D Center • Perceive more competition in the science classroom than in the R&D Center 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 12
  • 13. Pearson r Correlations • Why do it? – Correlations tell us if one thing is related to another; if there is an association between the twotwo • We’re looking at the relationship between the student perceptions of the learning environment and state test results – Those associations can be positive or negative – No correlation tells causation – Potential to demonstrate impact of school library 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 13
  • 14. Pearson r Correlations • Results – 3rd Grade: • Actual learning environment R&D Center perceptions – Satisfaction is negatively correlated with friction, competition, and difficulty; positively correlated with cohesion (matches the preferred)difficulty; positively correlated with cohesion (matches the preferred) – Friction is positively correlated with competition and difficulty and negatively correlated with cohesion and mathematics scores – Difficulty is negatively correlated with cohesion, scores in mathematics and scores in reading • Actual learning environment science class perceptions – Positive correlation between reading and mathematics – No other correlations between the science class learning environment and the math and reading scores 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 14
  • 15. Learning Environment 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 15
  • 16. Pearson r Correlations • Results – 4th Grade: • Actual learning environment R&D Center perceptions – Satisfaction is negatively correlated with friction and difficulty and positively correlated with cohesion and mathematics scorespositively correlated with cohesion and mathematics scores – Friction is positively correlated with competition and writing scores and negatively correlated with cohesion and reading scores – Reading is positively correlated with both mathematics and writing • Actual learning environment science class perceptions – Difficulty is negatively correlated with mathematics – Positive correlation between reading and writing 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 16
  • 17. Learning Environment 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 17
  • 18. Pearson r Correlations • Results – 5th Grade: • Actual learning environment R&D Center perceptions – Difficulty is positively correlated with science – Cohesion is positively correlated with mathematics– Cohesion is positively correlated with mathematics – Positive correlation between science and mathematics and science and reading • Actual learning environment science class perceptions – Negative correlation between satisfaction and friction; and satisfaction and difficulty – Negative correlation between satisfaction and mathematics – Positive correlation between science and mathematics, reading and mathematics, and reading and science 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 18
  • 19. Learning Environment 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 19
  • 20. Conclusions • The methodology for assessing a science classroom environment can be extended to the school library setting. • Knowledge of student perceptions could be used to guide the evolution and improvement of the learning environment. • Assessment of a school library learning environment could be a key factor in determining the success of new teaching methods andfactor in determining the success of new teaching methods and resources. • From a practical point of view, this study presents a new model for considering the contribution of school libraries to the field of education, specifically science education. • From a research point of view, this study makes a unique contribution to the field of learning environments by evaluating school library programs and their relationship to classroom environments. 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 20
  • 21. Future Research • Modified and validated new instruments that examine the inquiry aspect of the learning environment • Future research will include the application of these instruments in a broader range of school settings • Beyond applying these instruments to school library settings,• Beyond applying these instruments to school library settings, the next step is consideration of intervention strategies to affect the positive aspects of the learning environment • Short term and longitudinal studies, including international schools 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 21
  • 22. Future Research 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 22
  • 23. Contact Information Barbara A. Schultz-Jones, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, School Library Program Department of Library and Information Sciences College of Information, University of North Texas 1155 Union Circle 311068, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 Office: 940-369-8081 Fax: 940-565-3101 Barbara.Schultz-Jones@unt.eduBarbara.Schultz-Jones@unt.edu Cynthia E. Ledbetter, Ph.D. Professor, Science Education Science/Mathematics Education Department University of Texas at Dallas 800 West Campbell Rd., FN32, Richardson, TX 75080-0688 Office: 972-883-2496 FAX: 972-883-6796 ledbetter@utdallas.edu 9/28/2010 Schultz-Jones & Ledbetter 23