WHEN MURDER IS NOT AN OPTIONDealing with Conflict<br />Business Visions<br />Sandy Ringer<br />502.718.7749<br />
What is Conflict?<br /><ul><li>Definition: A sharp disagreement of opposition of interests or ideas.
Synonyms include:
Fight
Struggle
Contention
Organizations need to understand the cause and impact of workplace conflict.</li></ul>2<br />
   Sources of Conflict<br /><ul><li>Competition for limited resources
Competing demands and expectations
Personality clashes / aggressive personalities
Behavior of others</li></ul>3<br />
  Sources of Conflict (cont.)<br /><ul><li>External Factors
Poorly functioning equipment
Time constraints
Badly designed policies / procedures
Internal Factors
Dissimilar values / biases
Fear of the unfamiliar
Unrealistic expectations
Inflexibility</li></ul>4<br />
The Value of Conflict<br /><ul><li>Is natural and can be valuable
Can be a source of energy
Is a result of real differences
Different perspectives allow for  breakthrough thinking
Improved creativity and problem solving
Positive release of emotion, anxiety and stress</li></ul>	Conflict pushes us to strive for solutions and collaboration.<br...
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March 2011 IABC Presentation

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  1. 1. WHEN MURDER IS NOT AN OPTIONDealing with Conflict<br />Business Visions<br />Sandy Ringer<br />502.718.7749<br />
  2. 2. What is Conflict?<br /><ul><li>Definition: A sharp disagreement of opposition of interests or ideas.
  3. 3. Synonyms include:
  4. 4. Fight
  5. 5. Struggle
  6. 6. Contention
  7. 7. Organizations need to understand the cause and impact of workplace conflict.</li></ul>2<br />
  8. 8. Sources of Conflict<br /><ul><li>Competition for limited resources
  9. 9. Competing demands and expectations
  10. 10. Personality clashes / aggressive personalities
  11. 11. Behavior of others</li></ul>3<br />
  12. 12. Sources of Conflict (cont.)<br /><ul><li>External Factors
  13. 13. Poorly functioning equipment
  14. 14. Time constraints
  15. 15. Badly designed policies / procedures
  16. 16. Internal Factors
  17. 17. Dissimilar values / biases
  18. 18. Fear of the unfamiliar
  19. 19. Unrealistic expectations
  20. 20. Inflexibility</li></ul>4<br />
  21. 21. The Value of Conflict<br /><ul><li>Is natural and can be valuable
  22. 22. Can be a source of energy
  23. 23. Is a result of real differences
  24. 24. Different perspectives allow for breakthrough thinking
  25. 25. Improved creativity and problem solving
  26. 26. Positive release of emotion, anxiety and stress</li></ul> Conflict pushes us to strive for solutions and collaboration.<br />5<br />
  27. 27. Common Responses to Conflict<br /><ul><li>Avoiding
  28. 28. Smoothing
  29. 29. Forcing
  30. 30. Compromising</li></ul>6<br />
  31. 31. DESTRUCTIVE CONFLICT<br /><ul><li>Reduces cooperation and teamwork
  32. 32. Brings about hostility
  33. 33. Undermines the system and the people within it</li></ul>7<br />
  34. 34. Examples of Destructive Conflict<br /><ul><li>Refusal to cooperate
  35. 35. Verbal attacks
  36. 36. Sabotage of projects
  37. 37. Talking behind another’s back to uninvolved people to gain support for one’s position
  38. 38. Purposely missing deadlines
  39. 39. Making deliberate errors in one’s work</li></ul>8<br />
  40. 40. Destructive conflict must be identified and managed to reduce its negative effects. <br />Unfortunately, the destructive elements of conflict are present simultaneously with its positive or constructive elements – it swirls together!<br />9<br />
  41. 41. Conflict Management Style<br />What’s Your Conflict Management Style?<br />10<br />
  42. 42. Five Most Common Conflict Management Styles<br />11<br />High<br />Win-Lose<br />Competition<br />Win-Win<br />Collaboration<br />ASSERTIVENESS<br />Compromise<br />Lose-Lose<br />Avoidance<br />Lose-Win<br />Accommodation<br />Low<br />ACCOMMODATION<br />High<br />
  43. 43. A Win-Win Approach<br />Typical Tactics<br />- Stating your views about the issue or problem in clear, nonjudgmental language<br />- Clarifying the core issues by sorting out areas of agreement from areas of disagreement<br />- Listening carefully to each person’s point of view<br />12<br />
  44. 44. Factors that De-Escalate Tension<br /><ul><li>Focus on the objective – not the subjective
  45. 45. Listen more – talk less
  46. 46. Don’t put others on the “defensive”
  47. 47. Deal with conflict early
  48. 48. Refuse to “play the game”</li></ul>13<br />
  49. 49. The 10 Most UnwantedAndHow to Deal With Them!<br />
  50. 50. The 10 Most Unwanted<br /><ul><li>The Tank
  51. 51. The Sniper
  52. 52. The Know-It-All
  53. 53. The Think-They-Know-It-All
  54. 54. The Grenade
  55. 55. The Yes Person
  56. 56. The Maybe Person
  57. 57. The Nothing Person
  58. 58. The No Person
  59. 59. The Whiner</li></ul>15<br />
  60. 60. The Tank<br />Pushy and ruthless, loud and forceful, or with the quiet intensity and surgical precision of a laser, the task assumes that the end justifies the means. Expect no mercy.<br />Your goal: Command respect.<br />16<br />
  61. 61. The Sniper<br />This covert operator identifies your weaknesses and uses them against you, through sabotage behind your back or well-aimed putdowns in front of the crowd.<br />Your goal: Get all his “snipes” and objections on the table.<br />17<br />
  62. 62. The Know-It-All<br />This person knows 98% of anything. Just ask! They will tell you what they know – for hours at a time – but won’t take a second to listen to your clearly inferior ideas.<br />Your goal: To open their mind to new information and ideas.<br />18<br />
  63. 63. The Think-They-Know-It-All<br />This character does not know much, but does not let that get in the way. Exaggerating, bragging, misleading, and distracting, these legends-in-their-own minds pull you off track.<br /> Your goal: Give their bad ideas the hook, and replace with more acceptable solutions.<br />19<br />
  64. 64. The Grenade<br />They blow their tops, they’re unable to stop, and shrapnel hits everyone in range. Then the smoke clears, the dust settles, and the cycle begins building to critical mass again.<br /> Your goal: Take control of the situation before the person starts to lose it if possible.<br />20<br />
  65. 65. The “Yes” Person<br /> Quick to agree, slow to deliver, the Yes Person leaves a trail of non-commitments and broken promises. Though they please no one, Yes People over commit to please.<br />Your goal: Get commitments you can count on, and HOLD THEM ACCOUNTABLE!<br />21<br />
  66. 66. The “Maybe” Person<br />When faced with a crucial decision, they keep putting it off until it’s too late - but there comes a point when the decision makes itself. Then, it’s nobody’s fault but their own.<br /> Your goal: Help them think decisively.<br />22<br />
  67. 67. The “Nothing” Person<br />You won’t know what’s going on because they tell you nothing! No verbal feedback. No nonverbal feedback. They seal their mouths and stare past you as if you’re not there.<br /> Your goal: Persuade the person to talk.<br />23<br />
  68. 68. The “No” Person<br />They say that “What goes up must come down.” And what comes down must never be allowed to get back up again. Doleful and discouraging, they drive others to despair.<br />Your goal: Getting them to transition into a problem-solving mode.<br />24<br />
  69. 69. The Whiner<br /> They wallow in their woe, whine incessantly, and carry the weight of the world on their shoulders.<br />Your goal: Form a problem-solving alliance.<br />25<br />
  70. 70. In Summary . . .<br /><ul><li>Don’t avoid conflicts – they will always be there!
  71. 71. Do understand your personality & ways to deal with the situation.
  72. 72. Use clear communications to deal with conflict.
  73. 73. Listen, listen & listen!
  74. 74. Learn personalities, and diminish the triggers of conflict.</li></ul> Thank you!<br />26<br />
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