LOCOG - Adecco's Diversity and Inclusion Case Study

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Adecco signed the contract to be the Official Recruitment Services Provider to the Olympic and Paralympic Games on 23rd December 2008. …

Adecco signed the contract to be the Official Recruitment Services Provider to the Olympic and Paralympic Games on 23rd December 2008.
The challenge was:
-to recruit the people to put on the greatest show on earth.
-to help London 2012 meet the commitment it made in Singapore in 2005 when it won the bid, to be the most diverse and inclusive Games ever.
-to provide outplacement services to the workforce during 2012.

The results:
By the end of the Games Adecco had recruited over 8,300 people,
nearly 5,000 in the six months leading up to the Games, managing over 218,000 applications.

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  • 1. adecco.co.uk London 2012 | Diversity & Inclusion Case Study Adecco signed the contract to be the Official Recruitment Services Provider to the Olympic and Paralympic Games on 23rd December 2008. The challenge Adecco’s role was wide ranging, complex and demanding: • Recruit the people to put on the greatest show on earth, the people who would determine if London 2012 would be a success or not. • Help London 2012 meet the commitment it made in Singapore in 2005 when it won the bid, to be the most diverse and inclusive Games ever. Sebastian Coe committed to the regeneration of Stratford and, for the first time, the incorporation of the Olympic and Paralympic Games under one organising committee. Two key objectives as a result were to ensure the workforce reflected the diversity of London and ensure the Paralympics were reflected in the workforce. • Provide outplacement services to the workforce during 2012. • All this needed to be achieved by the Opening Ceremony on 27th July 2012. By the end of the Games Adecco had recruited over 8,300 people, nearly 5,000 in the six months leading up to the Games. We recruited the widest range of staff from Board Directors to Stewards, from Venue and Operations Directors to procurers of shuttlecocks, the people who staged what was widely described by the media and commentators alike as the greatest Olympic and Paralympic Games ever. Services Systems design and implementation including the London 2012 Job site Outplacement services throughout 2012 Staff Permanent staff 3,800 Games staff (during the Games) 4,500 Managing over Pre-employment screening of all staff applications 218,000 London 2012 Diversity & Inclusion Case Study
  • 2. London 2012 | Diversity & Inclusion Case Study Within all phases there was a constant focus on social inclusion. There were pressures politically, as well as the well publicised commitment in Singapore, to regenerate the East End of London and be the most diverse and inclusive Games ever. Unemployed 15%-20% 20% 6 Host Borough residents How we did it Whilst every stream of diversity was important, there were two areas that had additional focus: • Disability For the first time, an Organising Committee incorporated the Paralympic and Olympic Games, so ensuring disabled people were represented in the workforce was essential. • Ethnicity The commitment in Singapore to help regenerate the East End of London, one of the most diverse communities in the world, required the workforce to be drawn, where possible, from local people. Recruiting disabled people The two major challenges of recruiting disabled people were: • Making suitable provision in the workplace for specific disabilities. • Reaching out to disabled people who would not normally apply and convince them that we were serious and committed to employing talented people whether disabled or not. Diversity and inclusion, the unemployed and engagement with the six host boroughs in the East End of London were firmly top of the agenda for the Board of LOCOG and therefore Adecco. Most organising committees from previous Games had, to a large extent, relied on the Games experts who moved from Games to Games and, with London being a popular destination, hiring from this pool of specialists would have been the easier and lower risk approach but would have been politically unacceptable. LOCOG had set themselves diversity targets to reflect the population of London based on the last census. The following were targets set to reflect the percentage of the LOCOG workforce: 46%- 54% Disability 3%- 6% 20%-30% Age <30 10%-15% Age >50 5%-7% LGBT* *Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual Gender (female) 18%-29% Ethnicity LOCOG workforce diversity targets LOCOG workforce diversity targets
  • 3. adecco.co.uk London 2012 | Diversity & Inclusion Case Study The work environment at LOCOG’s offices was accessible and provision was made to ensure adaptations were made for any disability. Communicating the fact that this was an inclusive work environment, that we actively encouraged disabled people to apply and that it was skills we were interested in was a harder challenge. To demonstrate that we were serious and not just a slogan on a recruitment advertisement, we worked with LOCOG’s D&I team to develop a Guaranteed Interview Scheme for disabled people. If someone had the right skills and was disabled, they were guaranteed an interview. There were two outcomes. The recruiting team sometimes had short lists that were long, with many disabled people having the right skills. But the benefit was that we uncovered a rich seam of talent. So much so, we wanted to make sure we had access to the skills for future jobs. We developed a Disability Talent Pool. If a disabled candidate did not get the job they were interviewed for, but received positive feedback from the hiring managers, they were asked if they wanted to be considered for future jobs and were then flagged on the recruitment system for hiring managers to draw on for future short lists. Once signed up, candidates would be regularly emailed with news of London 2012 and new job vacancies. The success of this programme was reflected in the fact that 10% of the total workforce had a declared disability by Games time. Recruiting Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) people The target to recruit people from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic groups (BAME) was between 18 and 29%. However, by the summer of 2010, whilst we were attracting 33% of applicants from BAME backgrounds, we were only hiring 11%. Demonstrating the importance of the issue, we were asked to come up with a plan to rectify the position as quickly as possible. We devised a two pronged approach. Firstly, we physically took our recruitment activity out to the communities of the East End of London. We had been surprised at the lack of attendance when we had organised recruitment events at the offices of LOCOG in Canary Wharf. On investigating the reasons, we were told that most people from the host boroughs considered the high rise office blocks of Canary Wharf as very separate from their neighbourhood. We therefore organised recruitment events in local venues and enlisted the help of Job Centre Plus, local employment brokerages and other local community groups to get people along to local venues where we would give a presentation about the work being done at LOCOG and the desire to hire local people. We also used the local community groups to help people with their applications and even had vacancies posted in mosques. The second prong was to use the success of the Disability Talent Pool and develop something similar for BAME candidates. This required us to ask the applicants, when filling out the diversity questionnaire, if they were from a BAME background, if they wanted to be considered to be part of the Talent Pool and to do so, agree to have their names associated with the BAME Talent Pool. The risk in this approach was that it could be seen as positive discrimination. We consulted the legal teams at both Adecco and LOCOG and their opinion was that as LOCOG had committed from the outset to reflect the diversity of the communities of the East End of London in its workforce, we would only be using the talent pool approach to meet published commitments. The focus, as with all candidates, was on the right skills for the job. Our role was to spread the net wider and reach out to those that would not normally apply. Again, the result was spectacular. At the start of the Games, 33% of the workforce were from BAME backgrounds. Internal education Because of the scale of the recruitment operation, as well as the additional challenges and targets around diversity and inclusion, a competency framework based on the LOCOG values was created and implemented jointly by LOCOG and Adecco. The framework was used in all communications with hiring managers to educate them in how to attract and recruit the best, and most diverse and inclusive workforce possible. With the growth of the workforce, including managers who would build their own teams, we created and implemented a training programme that was delivered weekly to all new hiring managers. This included a focus on LOCOG’s commitment to deliver against their challenging diversity and inclusion targets and the programmes we had put in place to help achieve this. In addition, one-off courses were delivered by the D&I team to Functional Areas in conjunction with the Adecco team. Diversity & Inclusion Unique software developed to track diversity through all stages of recruitment: MonthlyBy department *Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic Ethnicity (BAME*): 1 3Two programmes developed to reach disabled candidates: 2 Guaranteed Interview Scheme Disabled Talent Pool BAME* Talent Pool
  • 4. London 2012 | Diversity & Inclusion Case Study But hosting an Olympic and Paralympic Games in the modern era is about much more than putting on the biggest global sporting event. With billions invested by the host country there is a greater emphasis on the transformative powers of the Games, a legacy. For London it was all about the regeneration of a run down area of East London and an engagement with one of the poorest areas of London and one of the most diverse areas in the world. For LOCOG and Adecco this translated into the diversity and inclusion agenda. Through a series of innovative programmes and continual dialogue with the communities of the six host boroughs, we ensured the diversity targets were exceeded: over 25% of the LOCOG workforce were previously unemployed and over 25% of the workforce were six host borough residents. The results London 2012 is considered to be the most successful Games ever and this is entirely down to having the right people in place to deliver. Adecco is proud to have been a sponsor and the recruitment organisation behind the placement of those people that made it such a success. 48% Disability 10% 25% 25% 40% Age <30 13% Age >50 5% LGBT*Gender (female) 33% 18%-29% Ethnicity 3%-6% 46%-54% 20%-30% 10%-15% 5%-7% Achieved Target Achieved Target *Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transsexual Unemployed 15%-20% 20% 6 Host Borough residents LOCOG workforce diversity results LOCOG workforce diversity results By working closely with the senior team at LOCOG, Adecco has demonstrated that hiring a diverse and inclusive workforce is not about achieving targets but about having the best, most innovative and capable workforce possible; one able to put on one of the largest, most complex, deadline driven projects the world has seen and one that uniquely reflects the people and capabilities of London. Adecco takes from the project unique experience and a series of practical tools to help our existing and future clients better engage with local communities. We attract and source unique talent and above all deliver skills and teams to help organisations be the best in their respective markets.