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Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2
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Maureen Dowd - Period 1 & 2

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Megan Aquino, Victor Camargo, Vayshon Hesz, & Bailey Jackson

Megan Aquino, Victor Camargo, Vayshon Hesz, & Bailey Jackson

Published in: Education
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  • 1. The Perils of Plagiarism: Maureen Dowd Megan Aquino, Victor Camargo, Vayshon Hesz, Bailey Jackson Taiz/Bell Period 1 & 2
  • 2. Who is Maureen Dowd? • Maureen Dowd was born in Washington D.C. • She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature from Catholic University of Washington D.C. • Dowd started her journalism career in 1974 as an editorial assistant for The Washington Star. • There, she wrote as a sports columnist, metropolitan reporter, and feature writer.
  • 3. Who is Maureen Dowd?• In 1981, The Washington Starclosed and Dowd joined TimeMagazine.• In 1983, Dowd joined The NewYork Times as a metropolitanreporter.• Maureen Dowd has written twocolumns a week for The NewYork Times since 1995.• Dowd was a winner of the 1999Pulitzer Price for distinguishedcommentary.
  • 4. What,Where, & When: MaureenDowd vs. Talking Points Memo• On Saturday, May 18, 2009, Maureen Dowd wrote aboutRepublican policies in her weekend column in The New YorkTimes.• This column included a 43-word paragraph that was almostword-for-word to one written by Josh Marshall on the politicalwebsite Talking Points Memo.
  • 5. What,Where & When: MaureenDowd vs. Talking Points Memo•The similarity was first noticed by Talking Points Memo the nextmorning.• By evening, Dowd had publically apologized in an e-mail toHuffington Post claiming she had never read Marshall’s column,and the general idea of the paragraph came from a friend whohad been helping her write her report the day earlier.
  • 6. Comparing the two paragraphs:• The only difference between the two paragraphs is that in Dowd’s version, “we” is changed to “the Bush crowd”.•Dowd: “More and more the timeline is raising the question of why, if the torture was to prevent terrorist attacks, it seemed to happen mainly during the period when the Bush crowd was looking for what was essentially political information to justify the invasion of Iraq.”
  • 7. Comparing the two paragraphs:•Josh Marshall of Talking Points Memo: “More and more the timeline is raising the question of why, if the torture was to prevent terrorist attacks, it seemed to happen mainly during the period when we were looking for what was essentially political information to justify the invasion of Iraq.”
  • 8. Intentional Act of Plagiarism or Honest Mistake?Was the 2009 Maureen Dowd plagiarism controversy an intentional act of plagiarism or a honest mistake?• Many people believe Dowd when she said in herHuffington Post apology that she had gotten the idea of theparagraph from a friend that was helping her. They say Maureen Dowd is a columnist who has written hundreds of articles in her career & it is easy to make a mistake.
  • 9. Intentional Act of Plagiarism or Honest Mistake? Was the 2009 Maureen Dowd plagiarism controversy an intentional act of plagiarism or a honest mistake?•All the same, many people argue that Maureen Dowd’s 45-word paragraph is too similar to Josh Marshall’s 43-wordparagraph, and that it is impossible for one to come up witha paragraph so similar without having have looked at theoriginal first. They argue Dowd most likely plagiarized the paragraph off of TalkingPointsMemo.com because she assumed no one would notice, as TPM is far less popular than The New York Times.
  • 10. In Conclusion…Whether you think thatMaureen Dowd plagiarizedthe paragraph or not, we canall agree that the two articlesof writing are very similar… … So whether you are a student in an ACHS classroom or a weekly columnist in The New York Times, try to cite your sources, check your websites, and steer as far away from plagiarizing as you can!

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