Arch 5110 – Pre-thesisInterrogation 4                          what about form?                           Somol and Aureli...
somolSomol crushes the mythology in architecture and urbanism – the maskwhich covers a mere landscape of shapes.A mask gen...
shape vs. form              Shape is simply cool or boring       Shape is void of information, low-resolution             ...
shapeTraced to calculatedvagueness in renderings ofHugh Ferris and thehollowness of minimalist artMonumental (Superstudio’...
shapeInside inconsistent with theoutsideIntensive (OMA’s approachin CCTV to proportionatelyincrease volume andenvelope by ...
shapeExists in the materialworld, unlike form, whichcan be abstract,theoreticalEvidence of the effect ofentropy in archite...
SHAPE ‘MUST’   FLOAT?
“A shape is hole in a thing itis not. People look throughthem or from them, andnot necessarily at them.”(Carl Andre)(As co...
The WhitneyMuseum
shape is hieroglyph                                  =“Shapes can be interpreted as hieroglyphics; incomprehensible, yet t...
Architecture and Content, AureliUrban scene did not take the object of architecture.Monumentality is being brought back in...
Herzog and De Meuron   Richard Meier Shapers?              mover?
-isms   neo-classicism – romanticism – realism – symbolism – impressionism – post-impressionism –    cloisonnism – synthet...
-ismsblobism –architecture in which buildings have an organic, amoeba-shaped, bulgingformscritical regionalism –an approac...
Sage Gatestead, Norman Foster
-ismsblobism –architecture in which buildings have an organic, amoeba-shaped, bulgingformscritical regionalism –an approac...
Vitra Design Museum, Frank Gehry
UFA-Palast in Dresden by Coop Himmelb(l)au
-isms“Following the defeat of other types of false-consciousness, includingfunctionalism, organicism, realism, pragmatism,...
-isms|Questions|Do notions of –isms now propagate new architectures or are theysimply pedagogical means to classify an oth...
what am i? mover or shaper?Libeskind: I like   Zaha: I am driven bydeconstructivism    deconstructivism also!
what am i? mover or shaper?    Peter Eisenman: I like deconstructivism, and    conceptualism
what are we?   Diller Scofidio + Renfro:   floating shape We like conceptualism too!
what am i?                                      Norman Foster: I go for Blobism andFrank Ghery: I favor Blobism and       ...
what am i?Niemeyer: I have breathed modernism   Rem Koolhaas: I like Conceptualism                                      an...
architectural optimismEnvisions a world in which the architect can reappropriate spaces without having torely on the intel...
what architecture is really aboutSomol suggests that we need to pay attention to what architecture isreally about – not th...
shiftShift from the mapping-fetishism of the 1990s to a new shape-fetishism inthe zeros of the new millenniumValue in larg...
contentToday the content of the easy contributes to an economy of informationthat, behind the mythology of accessibility, ...
OMA
Herzog & de Meuron
Jean Nouvel
Toyo Ito
Diller + Scofidio
MVRDV
form – object to form-indexRudolf Wittkower, Colin Rowe, orPeter Eisenman = difficult form orform-objectPresent ‘shape arc...
Aureli’s conclusionWe must concentrate on the idea of form, determining the specific senseof it for each case, in such a w...
What About Form?
What About Form?
What About Form?
What About Form?
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What About Form?

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  • So if you were to take all the isms out of architecture, what we would be left with would be plain shapes.
  • Minimalist art was trying to be better than theatre in terms of dealing with the real. However, I do not really see the point of doing that, since we are dealing with two different art types, one not really less deserving of attention and respect than the other.
  • Agree very much with this quote, and Koolhaas emphasized this in his most recent lecture.
  • A shape carries with it an embedded symbolic meaning, even though not expressly linguistic as set by the grammatical structure of a language. In this case, a language of architecture. Some sort of ism.
  • Distinction a bit blurred, because some movers, like Peter Eisenman, has become kind of a shaper, and everyone cannot deny the influence of some kind of ism in their lives.
  • These two examples show how two people can produce very different architecture using the same ism, making it kind of difficult to separate what is object/form, versus what is shape sometimes.
  • Given the present state of architecture, we can say that its content consists in the precision with which architectural form replicates the low-resolution of information (in other words, our reality), obliterating the condition and the convention of its form-objecthood.Koolhaas, Herzog & de Meuron, Jean Nouvel, Toyo Ito, Diller + Scofidio, MVRDV and all of their followers – is pure content, or contenthood, as Fried might say today.
  • Therefore, “difficult form” which has embedded in it all of the formal architectural theory of the past 50 years – positively symbolized by the likes of Rudolf Wittkower, Colin Rowe, or Peter Eisenman – is founded on the belief that it is necessary to construct a complex “dispositif” for form, a whole system of virtual objects to support it and which are proof of its existence: a diagram of its own constitutional process.
  • Interesting conclusion, because for most of the article I thought he would make the case that we are on the right track. Then, suddenly, he says the contrary – that we should be careful with shapes and remind ourselves of forms and their importance also.
  • What About Form?

    1. 1. Arch 5110 – Pre-thesisInterrogation 4 what about form? Somol and Aureli’s Readings Hugo Lemes | Victor Ramos | Hanjoon Kim
    2. 2. somolSomol crushes the mythology in architecture and urbanism – the maskwhich covers a mere landscape of shapes.A mask generated by anthropology, sociology, technology, etc (all the‘isms’ of the world).
    3. 3. shape vs. form Shape is simply cool or boring Shape is void of information, low-resolution Shape requires participation Form is always seriousForm results from generative process and some sort of ‘ism’ Form must be reasoned, always
    4. 4. shapeTraced to calculatedvagueness in renderings ofHugh Ferris and thehollowness of minimalist artMonumental (Superstudio’sContinuous Monument)Arbitrary, ambiguous
    5. 5. shapeInside inconsistent with theoutsideIntensive (OMA’s approachin CCTV to proportionatelyincrease volume andenvelope by using largevoids, holes, etc) Melnikov House
    6. 6. shapeExists in the materialworld, unlike form, whichcan be abstract,theoreticalEvidence of the effect ofentropy in architecture.Buoyant, must float
    7. 7. SHAPE ‘MUST’ FLOAT?
    8. 8. “A shape is hole in a thing itis not. People look throughthem or from them, andnot necessarily at them.”(Carl Andre)(As contrary to aform/massing)
    9. 9. The WhitneyMuseum
    10. 10. shape is hieroglyph =“Shapes can be interpreted as hieroglyphics; incomprehensible, yet theirstubbornly figurative and symbolic character wants to be deciphered.”(Aureli)
    11. 11. Architecture and Content, AureliUrban scene did not take the object of architecture.Monumentality is being brought back into focus, particularly after 9/11Contemporary architecture divided into shapers and movers.One side bound to the super rational (movers) and the other, free(shapers)
    12. 12. Herzog and De Meuron Richard Meier Shapers? mover?
    13. 13. -isms neo-classicism – romanticism – realism – symbolism – impressionism – post-impressionism – cloisonnism – synthetism – art deco – fauvism – cubism – maximalism – minimalism – post- minimalism – orphism – futurism – synthetism – expressionism – vorticism – suprematism – neo- expressionism – dadaism – surrealism – tachism – lyrical abstraction – constructivism – deconstructivism – rationalism – critical regionalism – regionalism – blobism – modernism – neomodernism – postmodernism – classicism – neo-classicism – romanticism – realism –symbolism – impressionism – post-impressionism – cloisonnism – synthetism – art deco – fauvism – cubism – maximalism – minimalism – post-minimalism – orphism – futurism – synthetism –expressionism – vorticism – suprematism – neo-expressionism – dadaism – surrealism – tachism – lyrical abstraction – constructivism – deconstructivism – rationalism – critical regionalism – regionalism – blobism – modernism – neomodernism – postmodernism – classicism – – romanticism – realism – symbolism – impressionism – post-impressionism – cloisonnism – synthetism – art deco – fauvism – cubism – maximalism – minimalism – post-minimalism –orphism – futurism – synthetism – expressionism – vorticism – suprematism – neo-expressionism – dadaism – surrealism – tachism – lyrical abstraction – constructivism – deconstructivism – rationalism – critical regionalism – regionalism – blobism – modernism – neomodernism – postmodernism – classicism – urbanism
    14. 14. -ismsblobism –architecture in which buildings have an organic, amoeba-shaped, bulgingformscritical regionalism –an approach to architecture that strives to counter placelessness and lack ofidentity in modern architecture by utilizing the building’s geographicalcontextdeconstructivism –is a development of postmodern architecture that is characterized by ideasof fragmentation, an interest in manipulating ideas of a structure’s surface orskin, non rectilinear shapes which serve to distort and dislocate some of theelements of architecture, such as structure and envelope
    15. 15. Sage Gatestead, Norman Foster
    16. 16. -ismsblobism –architecture in which buildings have an organic, amoeba-shaped, bulgingformscritical regionalism –an approach to architecture that strives to counter placelessness and lack ofidentity in modern architecture by utilizing the building’s geographicalcontextdeconstructivism –is a development of postmodern architecture that is characterized by ideasof fragmentation, an interest in manipulating ideas of a structure’s surface orskin, non rectilinear shapes which serve to distort and dislocate some of theelements of architecture, such as structure and envelope
    17. 17. Vitra Design Museum, Frank Gehry
    18. 18. UFA-Palast in Dresden by Coop Himmelb(l)au
    19. 19. -isms“Following the defeat of other types of false-consciousness, includingfunctionalism, organicism, realism, pragmatism, supermodernism, minimalism, populism and utopia, there is nothing left to be had excepta sublimation of all such residue, that is, an autistic and self-referential universe made up of fragments and driftingbabbles, incapable of transmitting any sense. This is a universenurtured by the tired regimes of words and meanings that, beyondtheir evident hermeneutic paranoia, do not propose any new ideas”
    20. 20. -isms|Questions|Do notions of –isms now propagate new architectures or are theysimply pedagogical means to classify an otherwise unclassifiableassembly of forms and shapes?Pertaining to pedagogy, what is good design and how does/shouldone teach it? Shapes or forms? Both?
    21. 21. what am i? mover or shaper?Libeskind: I like Zaha: I am driven bydeconstructivism deconstructivism also!
    22. 22. what am i? mover or shaper? Peter Eisenman: I like deconstructivism, and conceptualism
    23. 23. what are we? Diller Scofidio + Renfro: floating shape We like conceptualism too!
    24. 24. what am i? Norman Foster: I go for Blobism andFrank Ghery: I favor Blobism and Structural Expressionism/Late ModernismDeconstructivism /High-Tech Architecture
    25. 25. what am i?Niemeyer: I have breathed modernism Rem Koolhaas: I like Conceptualism and Deconstructivism
    26. 26. architectural optimismEnvisions a world in which the architect can reappropriate spaces without having torely on the intellectual taboo of the difficult and their many responsibilities tosociety, technological resources, program, and the moral blackmail of utopiaNO MORE ISMS! But then….architectural optimism is yet another ism|Questions|Would an architectural thesis devoid of any major ‘ism’ and speculation, be asacceptable as any ‘minimalist’, monolithic ‘shape’ architecture now being executed bythe most renown architects?There has been a teaching about visual representation in architecture schools; “Adrawing has to speak itself.” Does a building have to speak itself about what “ism” itis? As an architect, do you expect for the public to interpret architecture andunderstand how its form is driven other than experiencing by just looking at its shape?
    27. 27. what architecture is really aboutSomol suggests that we need to pay attention to what architecture isreally about – not the false image provided bydiagrams, logos, software, installation, mappings of urban realities, etc, orthe intellectual data.
    28. 28. shiftShift from the mapping-fetishism of the 1990s to a new shape-fetishism inthe zeros of the new millenniumValue in large shapes lies in their superficiality, emptiness, nothingness
    29. 29. contentToday the content of the easy contributes to an economy of informationthat, behind the mythology of accessibility, the ordinary, thespontaneous, and the self-organizing, hides an unconvincing ideologicaland political opacity.Koolhaas, Herzog & de Meuron, Jean Nouvel, Toyo Ito, Diller +Scofidio, MVRDV and all of their followers – is pure content, orcontenthood, as Fried might say today.Also:EXCESS OF CONTENT = LACK OF SENSE
    30. 30. OMA
    31. 31. Herzog & de Meuron
    32. 32. Jean Nouvel
    33. 33. Toyo Ito
    34. 34. Diller + Scofidio
    35. 35. MVRDV
    36. 36. form – object to form-indexRudolf Wittkower, Colin Rowe, orPeter Eisenman = difficult form orform-objectPresent ‘shape architects’ = form-index
    37. 37. Aureli’s conclusionWe must concentrate on the idea of form, determining the specific senseof it for each case, in such a way as to salvage it from its own already tiredand self-referential drift into content.
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