Hands Per Device (HPD)

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Hands-per-device, or HPD, is an alternative approach to efficiently designing interactive content and applications for a today's multi-platform ecosystem.

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  • Hello Steph/Yiibu: Apologies for the late reply (we’ve been really busy!), but thank you for the comprehensive response.

    Of course we’re aware that there is currently no way to detect if a device is one-handed or two-handed, and we completely agree that if there was, it would be great. The truth is, after viewing your presentation, it appears we’re both using very similar approaches to detection.

    Detection aside, the idea that we’re trying to push with HPD is that online providers should not simply decide between ’mobile and not mobile’, when planning, designing, and developing their content (we’re sure you know what we mean: this is the biggest current trend in web design / development circles at the moment) - what we’re hoping they see is that they need to look into the core issues, which are the differences in interaction among devices. HPD is merely our proposed approach to being able to economically and efficiently address the differences.

    Anyway, it was great exchanging ideas / sharing slides with you. We hope to see more presentations from you guys soon!

    Regards, Andrei
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  • Thanks...very interesting!

    We have been experimenting with ways to enhance responsive design to better account for the common edge cases that you mention. There are far too many cases where screen sizes are similar but the device itself (its browser capabilities, interaction models and physical size) are very different. Compensating for this is quite difficult as you are juggling many different types of information about the device...many of which cannot easily be detected.

    What we typically do is layer responsive design with capability detection. We also gather what we call 'tacit knowledge' which are properties and capabilities that cannot specifically be detected (e.g. you cannot use JavaScript or other detection technologies to determine if a device is in fact one or two handed...although it would be great to be able to do that!). We then enhance the design further based on these extra capabilities although we are just starting to consider how to best enhance for interaction methods (most of the enhancements so far have been traditional progressive enhancement based design enhancements).

    We used this technique to develop http://browser.nokia.com and you can see details of the approach in our Pragmatic Responsive Design presentation (Slideshare.net/yiibu).

    Thanks again!
    Steph
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  • informative and insightful, thx!
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  • It was very interesting to read this presentation and it was indeed very informative......
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  • Interesting for content providers...and critical as elearning moves from desktop to device.
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