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Huge
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These
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@constantcontact
#ccmobile

making the
case for
mobile
beyond text messages

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

/GhostPartner
@GhostPartner
share

#GhostLocal

blogs.constantcontact.com/tag/mobile/
learn mo...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

91%
of U.S. adults
own a cellphone
theatlantic.com

129,000,000
# of smartphones
owned in U.S....
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

83%
of our audiences use
mobile devices to
manage their personal
lives

80%

of adults 18-44 h...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

220,000,000!
Google “small business mobile marketing”

9

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

mobile responsive
vs.
mobile friendly

mobile friendly

11

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

12

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

US smartphone
subscriptions
expected to grow

+28%
in 2013

Mary Meeker

13

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

people look at smartphones
people look at mobile devices

150x

200x
per day

per day

Alan Mo...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

40%

of Americans under 35
used a mobile device to
make a donation.

50%

used a mobile device...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

90%

of mobile searches
lead to an action
searchengineland.com

75%

70%
who ran a local
searc...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

17

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

18

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

19

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

44%

Litmus.com

of email is opened
on a mobile device.

20

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

80%
of users delete
mobile email that
doesn’t look good.

Blue Hornet

30%
of users

unsubscri...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

22

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

66%

34%

of small businesses are
using mobile for their
business.

aren’t.

small business
us...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

• have no plans to adopt
mobile in the future
65%

34%
aren’t.

• lack of customer
demand 56%
...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

Dorothy S. Jones
April 1, 1947 – April 5, 2013
Services
Dorothy S. Jones, age 66, passed away
...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

why not?
we’re a
nonprofit…

not best
for my
products…

we’re
regulated
by the
government…

co...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

calendar or
time management

customer
communications

GPS / mapping

accounting or
invoicing

...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

28

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

YOU DON'T GET TO DECIDE
WHICH DEVICE PEOPLE USE TO
ACCESS YOUR CONTENT.
THEY DO.
Karen McGrane...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

at the end of
the day, it’s
about

success
30

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

31

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

tip
#1
avoid
using too
much text

32

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

tip
#2
avoid
multiple
columns

33

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

tip
#3
clear and
easy calls
to action

34

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

tip
#4
9-point font, headlines
don’t stand out

Minimum: 22-point
headlines, 11-point body
tex...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

tip
#4
Better: 22-point headlines,
16-point body text

avoid
tiny
fonts

36

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

tip
#5
use
images
carefully

37

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

bonus

#1
don’t
ignore
local
search

38

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

bonus

#2
don’t ask
customers or
supporters to
turn their
phones off!

39

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

1.4 billion
images
taken on mobile per day
Nokia’s Vesa Jutila, at DigitalK 2012

100 hours
of...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

44%

41

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

42

© 2013
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

less is more. focus –
use less text

use images carefully
(don’t rely on them)

use a single c...
@constantcontact
#ccmobile

next steps
have more questions? check out our
answers to 10 of the most popular at the
blog…
(...
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~~~~~~~~~...
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making the
case for
mobile
beyond text messages

© 2013
Ghost Partner: Making the case for Going Mobile
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Ghost Partner: Making the case for Going Mobile

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Perhaps a forgone conclusion, but here are some good stats and best practices for being mobile with your email marketing.

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  • Presenter should introduce themselves. RDDs should mention Constant Contact ALEs would mention their own company and clarify their relationship to Constant Contact.(Ask people in the room if any of them have ever attended a previous seminar. If there are a lot,Clarify that this is new content but that some of the same strategies we have taught in the past still applySo they might see a few familiar strategies or tips along the way. (Then mention the workbook – explain what it is, briefly, and let them know that you will refer to itThroughout the session with short exercises for them to complete. Next ask …)How many people in the room are small businesses or work for a small business?How many are nonprofits ….on purpose (they will laugh) relate to the room that you know it’s been a tough year for some and that the informationCovered in the session should help them start to move the needle.
  • Presenter should introduce themselves. RDDs should mention Constant Contact ALEs would mention their own company and clarify their relationship to Constant Contact.(Ask people in the room if any of them have ever attended a previous seminar. If there are a lot,Clarify that this is new content but that some of the same strategies we have taught in the past still applySo they might see a few familiar strategies or tips along the way. (Then mention the workbook – explain what it is, briefly, and let them know that you will refer to itThroughout the session with short exercises for them to complete. Next ask …)How many people in the room are small businesses or work for a small business?How many are nonprofits ….on purpose (they will laugh) relate to the room that you know it’s been a tough year for some and that the informationCovered in the session should help them start to move the needle.
  • hello and thank you for joining us…we know that mobile and the use of mobile in business are a big topic these days, and we’re happy to have you here as we pull together what we think will be some very helpful information and tips as you think about mobile for your small business.At this time of year (summer), you’re either flat-out busy because you rely on the nicer weather, or you’re in a slow cycle waiting for business to pick up in the fall. In either case, we know that you’re thinking today about what you can do to build tomorrow’s success…and we hope to give you just a few things to think about with respect to mobile, and how you can start taking advantage of mobile today.[click to next slide]
  • hello and thank you for joining us…we know that mobile and the use of mobile in business are a big topic these days, and we’re happy to have you here as we pull together what we think will be some very helpful information and tips as you think about mobile for your small business.At this time of year (summer), you’re either flat-out busy because you rely on the nicer weather, or you’re in a slow cycle waiting for business to pick up in the fall. In either case, we know that you’re thinking today about what you can do to build tomorrow’s success…and we hope to give you just a few things to think about with respect to mobile, and how you can start taking advantage of mobile today.[click to next slide]
  • If you’re inspired to share any of the stats or tips you hear today, you’ve got a few ways to do that. You can add questions or comments to our timeline on our Facebook page (and we’ll actually respond!), and you can Tweet using our handle and the hashtag #ccmobile…you can also visit our blog where we have lots of great posts about mobile and small businesses.OK, with that out of the way, let’s get to our topic of the day…[click to next slide]
  • I’m going to lay out what we’re going to do today in a moment, but first I just want to get right to the point. Some of you listening today noted in your registration that you’re “already sold” or “I’m in and just want some tips” – we’ll get to those later. There were a lot of comments about needing help making the case to others in your organization to “go mobile.” Well…here are three stats that ought to help do that pretty quickly [build out the stats]Simply put, your customers are using mobile devices. A lot. These statistics alone should be enough to make the case and help convince you that it’s time to start thinking about how your business has to build mobile into it’s strategy. So, if you need to walk away right now, I hope this helps make the case – mobile is becoming an increasingly seamless part of our lives, and that includes your customers, members, supporters or followers.As an aside, the numbers I’m going to share today relate to a US-based population. I know we’ve got an international audience today, and I can tell you that the trends are moving in similar directions across the globe.[click to next slide]
  • Let’s just look at your use of mobile… [click to build]In one of our recent audiences, 85% said they were already using mobile devices to help manage their personal lives…CAN I SEE A SHOW OF HANDS IN THIS AUDIENCE OF HOW MANY USE MOBILE DEVICES TO MANAGE YOUR PERSONAL LIVES? You all can already appreciate the perspective of your customers, clients and supporters. When we look a little bit further at the physical connection of mobile devices to people, we see stats like this one [click to build]a recent study found that approximately 80% of adults have their mobile phone within arms reach for 22 hours a day. (http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/smartphones_b39001) if you think this sounds a little bit crazy, consider how you reacted the last time you thought you lost your phone…So, without even getting to a discussion about mobile and your business, just look at how mobile has become a seamless part of our personal lives…your customer’s lives…[click to next slide]
  • Simply put, “mobile” as a technology has become largely inseparable from how we go about our days, our personal lives, and as we’ll talk about today, our professional lives as well. As you might imagine, there is a LOT that we could choose to focus on or discuss when it comes to mobile. In fact, if you Google “small business mobile marketing” you’ll get [click to build] over 200 million hits..…but we don’t have a week to spend together, so we made some choices when creating this webinar on what we wanted to address, and here’s what we’re going to do today…. [click to next slide]
  • Simply put, “mobile” as a technology has become largely inseparable from how we go about our days, our personal lives, and as we’ll talk about today, our professional lives as well. As you might imagine, there is a LOT that we could choose to focus on or discuss when it comes to mobile. In fact, if you “small business mobile marketing” on Bing you’ll get [click to build] over 200 million hits..…but we don’t have a week to spend together, so we made some choices when creating this webinar on what we wanted to address.[click to next slide]
  • One of the ways that we narrowed the scope of what we’re going to talk about today is by deciding which “big ticket mobile question” to focus on. There’s two sides to this…You’ve seen, or may have heard, that when people talk about mobile they usually start by asking something like [click to build] “is your site, or are your emails, mobile-responsive or mobile-friendly?” At the heart, that’s a [click to build]technology question…one that addresses how different platforms (desktops, tablets, mobile phones) display different content, websites or images.The other side of this is to consider [click to build]“mobile friendly” as a marketing and strategy question, one focused on how a small business thinks about their customers or supporters, how a small business creates content,and how mobile has changed the way that their audiences consume that content.Today we’re going to focus on [click to build] the second – the idea of becoming more mobile-friendly from the perspective of the choices you can make to be better positioned in a world in which mobile has become a part of us.With that in mind, let’s look at where we’re going today.[click to next slide]
  • [click to build] we’ve been setting the stage, but we’re about to move on to…[click to build] really driving home the point and some more of the evidence about why you can’t ignore mobile, even if you think your customers aren’t using it. There’s a lot of data out there…we’ve pulled together the statistics that we think will most likely make you sit up and take notice. Then, we’ll…[click to build] take that look into mobile a step deeper, and closer to where you are today – the reality of mobile use by businesses and nonprofits for business, fundraising, communicating, etc. [click to build] Finally, we’re going to share with you some simple tips you can use today to start preparing your business or organization to go mobile. You don’t have to change everything about your business to start making the move to mobile, but you do have to be thoughtful about a lot of aspects of your business and how they intersect with the mobile reality. (DN NOTE: this needs to be in a format that can be delivered via PDF and that will display well on a mobile device)You may choose not to take steps to leverage mobile for your business or organization, or you may decide that now isn’t the right time. But by the end of this presentation you’ll at least be making those decisions informed about the place that mobile now holds in the worlds of small businesses.[click to next slide]
  • Spread of mobileIn 2013, smartphone subscriptions in the US are expected to grow 28% year over year. (Mary Meeker, Kleiner Perkins -- http://www.slideshare.net/kleinerperkins/kpcb-internet-trends-2013, slide 40)By the end of 2013, worldwide smartphone usage will reach 1.4 billion and tablet usage will reach 268 million. (ABI Research)[click to next slide]
  • PeoplePeople are doing all sorts of things on their mobile phones. In fact, recent research shows that we look at our mobile devices [click to build] up to 150 times per day. That number goes up of [click to build] you consider smartphones only…That’s for email, checking calendars, listening to music, taking or viewing pictures…and, oh, right…making phone calls!!Let’s look at some other ways in which mobile has become a part of our behavior…SourcesData came originally from TomiAhonen…source cited is from Alan Moore Slidesharehttp://www.slideshare.net/fullscreen/alan.smlxl/society-organisations-economies-reshaped-by-mobile/1 are doing all sorts of things on their mobile phones. In fact, recent research shows that we look at our mobile devices [click to build] up to 150 times per day. That number goes up of [click to build] you consider smartphones only…
  • Nonprofits are starting to experience an impact from the rise of mobile…[click to build]40% of Americans under the age of 35 said they used a mobile device like a phone or a tablet to make a donation.[click to build] Another half (50%) of them said that they used their smart phone or tablet to browse non-profit websites and emails. As mobile fundraising becomes a prominent way that donors connect with organizations, it’s essential that non-profits capitalize on the trend by looking towards mobile fundraising solutions.1 in 10 American adults have texted a charitable donation from their phones (http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/MobileGiving.aspx) [click to next slide]
  • one area in which behavior has clearly been influenced and aided by mobile has to do with what is referred to as “local search” – essentially, finding something you need. It could be food (restaurants) or stuff (goods and services), but there’s no denying mobile has become a part of our search for what we want.[click to build] 75% of mobile users are looking for real-time, location based information on their phones[click to build] 90% of those mobile searches lead to an action (gomonews.com)[click to build] and 70% of those actions take place within an hour of the search (CMO Council) -- which makes sense, because we search for something when we need it…and finding a solution to that need, especially one that is close by, makes taking action incredibly compelling…[click to next slide]
  • one area in which behavior has clearly been influenced and aided by mobile has to do with what is referred to as “local search” – essentially, finding something you need. It could be food (restaurants) or stuff (goods and services), but there’s no denying mobile has become a part of our search for what we want.[click to build] 75% of mobile users are looking for real-time, location based information on their phones[click to build] 90% of those mobile searches lead to an action (gomonews.com)[click to build] and 70% of those actions take place within an hour of the search (CMO Council) -- which makes sense, because we search for something when we need it…and finding a solution to that need, especially one that is close by, makes taking action incredibly compelling…[click to next slide]
  • one area in which behavior has clearly been influenced and aided by mobile has to do with what is referred to as “local search” – essentially, finding something you need. It could be food (restaurants) or stuff (goods and services), but there’s no denying mobile has become a part of our search for what we want.[click to build] 75% of mobile users are looking for real-time, location based information on their phones[click to build] 90% of those mobile searches lead to an action (gomonews.com)[click to build] and 70% of those actions take place within an hour of the search (CMO Council) -- which makes sense, because we search for something when we need it…and finding a solution to that need, especially one that is close by, makes taking action incredibly compelling…[click to next slide]
  • one area in which behavior has clearly been influenced and aided by mobile has to do with what is referred to as “local search” – essentially, finding something you need. It could be food (restaurants) or stuff (goods and services), but there’s no denying mobile has become a part of our search for what we want.[click to build] 75% of mobile users are looking for real-time, location based information on their phones[click to build] 90% of those mobile searches lead to an action (gomonews.com)[click to build] and 70% of those actions take place within an hour of the search (CMO Council) -- which makes sense, because we search for something when we need it…and finding a solution to that need, especially one that is close by, makes taking action incredibly compelling…[click to next slide]
  • And one of the most prominent activities managed via mobile is the reading and management of email. Email itself is a ubiquitous form of communication, and mobile phones have only increased the ever-present nature of email.But just how much email is being viewed on mobile devices? A whopping [click to build] 43% of emails!! That number has grown steadily in just the last 2 years (up from 10% in 2011).This should make you sit up and take notice. Have we made the point? Apologies if we started to shade into overstatement, but it’s all there: more people are using mobile phones, more mobile phones are “smart,” enabling a more seamless connection between the user, their needs, their searches and communication, and ultimately their decision to buy or support a business or organization. And as we just showed…to actually take action!Whether or not your customers or supporters are using mobile at the moment to interact with you, they are using mobile to interact with the world, of which you are most certainly a part. And more and more they will be expecting to be able to interact with businesses large and small through their mobile devices.[click to next slide]
  • And since that number is so high, businesses that send email need to keep two more numbers in mind…[click to build] mobile email, and a mobile email experience that is easy for your readers to navigate, is incredibly important. Arecent study (from Blue Hornet) found that 80% of email recipients delete mobile email that doesn’t look good… [click to build]and 30% unsubscribe from the email list…put that all together and what you have is an argument for considering mobile as you build your emails and communications [click to next slide]
  • If you’ve found yourself wondering “Should I be figuring out mobile for my organization?” or saying “I don’t need to worry about it…my business or my customers don’t ‘fit’ mobile” – well, we’re going to shed some light on what other small businesses and nonprofits have already figured out. Since we’ve been listening to and talking with our customers (over 500,000 small businesses) about mobile, it’s at this point that we usually get the question “how are small businesses using mobile?” They’ve seen the numbers like the ones we just showed you, and they’re quickly moving to understand and respond to the impact on them.So, not only are they seeing the numbers a lot of them have already begun incorporating “mobile” into their business and strategies. In this section we’re going to look at some of the ways in which small businesses are facing mobile head-on (and that you could consider)…and we’ll address a couple of the things we hear when small businesses push back a bit.[click to next slide]
  • We recently conducted a survey of our customers to uncover how they’re using mobile, as we found that a clear majority of them, [click to build], 66%, are using mobile for their businesses. That does mean, however, that a bit more than 1/3rd of small businesses aren’t.What reasons are given by the other 34%? Let's take a look…[click to next slide]
  • We hear that of the 34% not using mobile (and that might include some of you), here are the top 3 reasons they’re not using mobile for their business:[click to build]quite simply, 65% say that they have no plans to adopt mobile in the future[click to build]56% cite a lack of customer demand[click to build]and 28% say “mobile isn’t relevant to my industry or business”This last one makes some sense…it may not immediately be clear how mobile could be applied within some industries. Which got us to thinking – what industries out there might not immediately come to mind (like a lot of business-to-consumer businesses) as leveraging the growth of mobile? Here are just 4 that we found…[click to next slide]
  • [click to build]Hope Hummus is, as the name suggests, a food manufacturer…and they sell through distributors (grocery stores and supermarkets). They have a mobile website that focuses on showing people how to connect through social media, and most importantly provides a button (“Find Hope”) to start a local search for hope Hummus[click to build]Wheels Manufacturing is a small manufacturer of bicycle parts…and they sell through distributors. Their emails offer insights into new products coming, and even on a mobile device their brand is prominent (soid (986302660937(jkqqdsw7))[click to build]Funeral Innovations is a small start-up in the funeral services industry, and they provide innovative technical solutions to their partners. One of their solutions provides QR codes to be placed on materials, directing those that scan the code a mobile site allowing for relations of the deceased to leave memories or photos, and to get information about upcoming services.[click to build] Here is a Liberty Tax franchise, a provider of tax-preparation services. In this email there is a clear call-to-action placed where it can be easily accessed by someone viewing the email on a mobile phone.For now, we’re not looking at how these businesses did or did not follow mobile best practices…we’re focused on the fact that across industries you might not have expected mobile is becoming part of the toolkit to work with customers. In short, if mobile is coming to the two absolutes in life, then it’s likely not far from your business!![click to next slide]
  • I mentioned earlier that a lot of the questions from the registration form were about how to convince others in the organization to embrace mobile. Here are 4 push-backs you’re likely to hear, and a comment on each for why these should be more “speedbump” than “roadblock” on your way to adopting mobile…[click to build]We’re a nonprofit and don’t sell productsNonprofits are starting to experiment with accepting donations via mobile devices – Square…there are limitations, but new ideas are being tested…Nonprofits could also benefit from the proliferation of tools for mobile phones and tablets that make running events easier – apps for checking in attendees and certainly apps for taking pictures, capturing video and distributing them via social media live, during the event!![click to build]We’re highly regulated by the governmentYou might not use mobile to exchange sensitive information…but your emails help you to remain in touch with your clients or constituents and stay top-of-mind. It’s a communication consideration…In fact, the US government (including the Pentagon!), has started building out security and management solutions for mobile technology…and making it easier for government contractors to reach procurement officers on “any available operating platform, whether it is iOS or Android” (http://governmentcontractingtips.com/gct/2013/05/30/new-government-formatted-website-package-designed-for-procurement-smart-phones-and-tablets/)[click to build]Mobile wouldn’t be best for my particular productsYou may not sell your products via mobile, but you could consider mobile as a channel for communicating to your customers about your products (can you take pictures and send those? Can you create excitement and drive people to visit your store? Do you have a mobile-optimized web-site that you could direct people to through emails and posts?)There are also ways to collect information (like email addresses) from the people you meet (think about events or conferences) – you could have them Text to Join your email list, scan a QR code on your business card, etc.[click to build]Costs too highIf you’re already doing email marketing or social media marketing, you’re already “invested” – what we’re suggesting is more of shift in how you think about things you already do, like creating content.[click to next slide]
  • In addition to starting to incorporate mobile into considerations for how to market themselves, our recent study also uncovered a selection of data showing ways that SMBs are using mobile for their operations:[click to build]82% of small businesses use mobile for calendar or time management[click to build]74 % use a customer communications app.[click to build]52 % use a GPS and mapping app.[click to build]44 % use an accounting/invoicing app.Small businesses (and this means you) ARE mobile today…for various aspects of their business…[click to next slide]
  • Here are some more examples of how some small businesses are embracing mobile in their efforts to connect with their audiences[click to build] the NB Fitness Clubshows that sometimes the use case for mobile and a small business can be pretty simple. They had to communicate a change in their hours over the holiday…perfect example of a great communication for mobile (outside of the small font)…it’s a focused message, branded and unambiguous.[click to build] here is Alex’s Lemonade Stand, a non-profit that has considered mobile as it built an email announcement about an upcoming event. Notice the easy-to-locate call to action button, and good use of images (located after the most important information and the call to action).[click to build] the South Grove PTA…exercise a best practice and creates simple messages, easy to digest on a mobile device…with [click to build] a clear call to action (click the link) in the second one.[click to build] in this example, Boloco, a chain of burrito restaurants announces their Mother’s Day promotion with a simple email. As with the first two here, the text could be larger (we’ll mention that in a few minutes)…but note the simplicity. None of these involved hours of brainstorming around a conference room table…What you see here are small businesses thinking and working at building mobile into their communications strategies. They’re doing this because they’ve realized something that eventually all businesses will…[click to next slide]
  • read the quotation…it’s worth the speaker reading this.Once you recognize this, I mean really recognize this at a foundational level, you’ll be ready to see that…[click to next slide]
  • Mobile can enable small businesses to work more effectively – at the moment that matters, whether that’s using mobile check-in to allow a consultant to step out from behind a registration table at a networking event and engage better with his prospective customers or letting a flower shop owner create and send an email coupon to her subscribers to draw in new business on rainy Tuesday. At the end of the day, embracing mobile is about success – the success of your efforts to communicate with your customers or supporters, and the success of your efforts to connect with them where they are…because they are most certainly connecting with their worlds via mobile.[click to next slide]
  • we've shown you how mobile has become prevalent in the world around us, and we've shown you how mobile is an increasingly important tool in the toolbox of small businesses…now we want to show you 5 tips for what you can do today to start preparing for or taking advantage of mobile...[click to next slide]
  • Tip #1: avoid using too much textThink about it – do you want to read long and complex messages on your phone? When you’re on the go? No. Which means neither do your customers or supporters. Do you want to read a message like the one here? [click to build] Probably not…What you want is to see something more like [click to build] this…the result of some basic considerations as you build your message:Start to re-think your content. Long-form content (think newsletters that have more than a couple of short, to-the-point paragraphs) doesn’t work for mobile readers. So look at the content you’re building and start to re-think it: could it be condensed? Can a picture tell the story better? Can you turn one newsletter into a series by cutting it into pieces?If you have longer, or more complex content or assets you want to share (like a product guide, or new regulations fo your clients or a research report that supporters of your non-profit would be interested in), send an email with a clear call-to-action that directs people to where that asset lives (on your website, blog, etc.[click to next slide]
  • Tip #2: avoid using multiple columnsPrior to the rise of mobile and mobile communication, emails had started to take on an almost website-like feel – with multiple columns and navigation elements similar to what you find on websites. But with mobile communications driving content to be more focused, and also just to fit a more physically condensed space, multiple columns cause problems.Here are two examples of what can happen:[click to build] In this first one, you can see how the mobile email client has tried to figure out what to do with the multiple columns…and it has [click to build]squished them together in a less than optimal way.[click to build] in this example, the email has been forced into a single column [click to build], but clearly that process has also created an ungainly single column that will make the email practically unreadable.[click to next slide]
  • Tip #3: clear and easy calls to actionYou want to make it easy for your readers to take an action, to do something that keeps them connected to you – come to your website or event registration page, click through to a white paper you wrote, learn more about your services. You can increase the odds of them taking that action by carefully thinking through the design of your emails. Let’s look at two examples of how not to do it, and one way to make it easier.[click to build] in this example, there are calls to action, but they’re [click to build] hard to see, and would be even harder to get a finger or thumb to hit them easily.[click to build] in this one, the calls to action are probably easier to get clicked on, but because they’re [click to build] bunched together, the likelihood that the reader will be able to click on the one they want is lower.[click to build] here’s one that works…notice how the call to action is [click to build] a button that is clearly separated from the rest of the content, both visually and spatially? This will make it easier for the reader to click on it. You should also consider making your images clickable…they’re ready-made buttons waiting to be clicked!A note here on buttons versus text links. What you really want to do is make it easy for your readers to take the action you suggest. Whether you give them large text links (with clear separation from surrounding text) or easy to tap buttons, make sure that there is no confusion about what action you want your reader to take: learn more? Register for an event? Make a donation? Make it incredibly easy…You should also be thinking about where that button or link takes them – will they be dumped into a screen that is hard to see on a mobile device? That could derail the entire experience for them… [click to next slide]
  • Tip #4: avoid using tiny fontsThis one would seem to be pretty self-explanatory…but is no less important.[click to build] here’s a sample with 9-point font. Yes, a lot of text fits on the screen, but who can read it? People will need to pinch-to-zoom the text, and then have to scroll around. They’re more likely to delete the message, as well as unsubscribe from future small-fonted emails.[click to build] this one is a bit better, as the font starts to reach a minimum size that we’d recommend (11 points for body text and 22 points for headlines), and starts to bring greater contrast between the text and the background. But it’s still hard to read.[click to next slide]
  • Tip #4: avoid using tiny fonts (continued)this third one gets better still…the font is now at a size that works better on a mobile device, but on a desktop it[click to build] won’t be overly large. So, at a minimum, use 11 point font for body text (and go larger for headlines – 22 points is good) and strong color contrast (dark text on a light background) – but also be sure to test the content on yourself…send the email to yourself and view it on your phone or tablet…or borrow one from a friend…[click to next slide]
  • Tip #5: use images carefullyImages are a great way to convey a message, tell a story…create a connection. But if you don’t carefully consider how you’re going to use images, you may end up with some unintended consequences that lead, at best, to someone not reading your email. At worst they’ll unsubscribe from your list and you won’t be able to communicate with them at all. Here are some common challenges to consider:[click to build] notice the red “X” here? That’s there because some mobile email clients may not display images by default…so be sure that you’re using what is called “Alt Text,” or text that appears if the image doesn’t, to at least let people know what’s there. [click to build] in this example, there’s a great picture – the promotional poster used for a fundraiser, and when viewed on a desktop email client it may look great…but the problem is that on a mobile device, in order to see it, or the rest of the message, [click to build] the reader will have to scroll the message. Notice also that the image has pushed the call to action all the way to the bottom of the message, making it less likely that the reader will actually click through.[click to build] finally, be aware of where or how an image may appear. You may need to resize images as you build your email (a lot of email marketing tools have simple, built in image-editing capabilities).Before you send any message out to your customers or supporters, TEST THE EMAIL BY SENDING IT TO YOURSELF!! And then view it with your readers in mind…and make changes accordingly. A few extra minutes of testing can save a lot of headache later.[click to next slide]
  • Bonus Tip #1: don’t ignore local searchOK, so remember when we said there’s so much out there about mobile that it’s hard to narrow down? Well, we had a hard time doing that for this section, so we’ve got some bonus tips for you. The first one is to make sure you keep local search in mind. If you’re a restaurant, a retailer of products or something that people are likely to search for as they’re out and about, there are a lot of listing services and apps out there that give small businesses the ability to get found. Here are just three examples:[click to build] yelp is one of the most popular location-based services…with lots of different categories available for people to search on. It can search by location, providing a map of the options available in the area where the search takes place.[click to build]urbanspoon is another, focused on finding dining options. As with most of these apps, patrons can leave reviews or photos…and there is easy access to directions and phone numbers.[click to build] Like we showed earlier, more and more mobile phone users are searching for information about local businesses through their phones – and they often act on those searches almost immediately. If you’re not listing your business or services everywhere you can, you’re missing opportunities. Spend some time to look over services like Yelp, YellowPages online, etc., and claim your name, claim your listing, make sure that at a minimum you’ll show up in searches when someone is looking for a service like yours. You can also seek out tools like SinglePlatform by Constant Contact, which allow you to update your information in one place and have that update flow out to all of the popular search tools and sites.When people search for you, you’d love to have the top listing on one of those search engines, or make sure your business’ “flag” shows up on the map like the one shown here.[click to next slide]
  • Bonus Tip #2: don’t turn the phones off!Unlike at the start of movies in a theater, lectures in a large hall or perhaps in church, you shouldn’t ask your customers, supporters, event attendees, etc. to turn their phones off. Phones have become an extension of how people experience the world…and how they share that experience with others. So they take pictures and post them to different channels…sometimes in real time. And along with that picture and that post comes an implied endorsement. Mobile phones also enable social media…posts, tweets, messages…it’s all right there at an individual’s fingertips.[click to build] these two examples are from Instagram – pictures were posted up by customers, offering emotional connections to the experiences that those customers were having.[click to build] In this one, you can see Tweets from customers endorsing products, an endorsement being shared with their networks, networks filled with individuals that might become that businesses’ next customer!We understand that you may have proprietary or sensitive information that you don’t want your customers or supporters to transmit, and in those cases you should obviously provide appropriate direction to your customers, supporters, clients or audiences. But as much as possible, allow people to keep their phones on. Make it clear that you welcome them sharing their thoughts of your presentation or content, and make it easy for them to do so (provide them with hashtags, Twitter handles, etc.).[click to next slide]
  • Bonus Tip #3: don’t youignore mobile technologyAlmost all phones manufactured today have a camera and messaging tools…that you can use to capture and share the personality of your organization. The volume of images and video being taken and shared every day is staggering [click to build] – offering a clue to just how much communication has become visual. In addition to taking pictures (of new items you’ve got in stock, of your employees interacting with customers, of your customers having a great time at an event or fundraiser), or videos of your organization’s supporters at that event, your phone can be a gateway to the social networks that you choose to use, making it easier for you to connect to your followers and audiences. And the most important thing to keep in mind with respect to mobile technology? Experiment, experiment, experiment…you’ll learn what works and what doesn’t for you and your supporters.[click to next slide]
  • We’ve put a lot in front of you today, we know. But don’t worry…you’re going to be hearing more from us in the future about mobile, and we’re going to be here to help you as you figure out how to make mobile work for your small business. Let me just review some of the things I want to make sure you take away from this presentation:First, we tried to make it clear that you can’t ignore mobile any longer.[click to build] with almost a third of Americans getting to the internet only through their mobile devices, and [click to build] close to half of all email being opened on mobile devices…[click to build] and ONLY 3% of people reading those emails and then doing something with them on a desktop)It has become increasingly clear that the behaviors of your customers, supporters (or potential customers and supporters) is moving them to consume information on mobile devices. More and more, if you want to connect to your audiences, you’re going to have to incorporate mobile into your thinking.[click to next slide]
  • We showed you how small businesses everywhere are embracing mobile for their own business operations [click to build] – they’re seeing mobile as a tool that can help them run a more successful business or nonprofit.They’re also jumping in to the world of mobile…testing and experimenting [click to build]– figuring out how to leverage mobile to help people find their products, get or share information and to let supporters or customers help tell their story (through images, reviews, etc.)[click to next slide]
  • Finally, we gave you a lot of tips to keep in mind as you start to think about how to make mobile a part of your communication strategy…[click to build]have more focused content; use single-column layouts; make it EASY for people to click on the links or buttons that you create for them to take an action[click to build]use the largest fonts reasonably can (don’t forget to test on yourself and your devices first); be careful with image use; be sure to visit local search sites like Yelp or Yellow Pages and claim your listings…or better yet, use a solution like SinglePlatform to manage your presence on multiple listing sites all at once[click to build]finally, encourage your customes, supporters, event attendees, clients to use their mobile phone when they’re in your shop, at your event, after a client meeting. Let them become a part of the voice of your organization. And don’t forget the power you hold in your hands with a mobile device…take pictures and video, post to social networks when you’re inspiredIn short, start to make “mobile” a part of your professional life and your thinking, and you’ll be off and running.[click to next slide]
  • And because what these numbers, and others we’ve mentioned here today, show is that people are using their mobile devices all the time. So go ahead and dip your toe in the water…and then get ready to jump in all the way!Calls to actionfollow the link that is now in the chat window to get your copy of the “Getting Ready for Mobile” checklist…which brings together a number of the things we talked about today, and which you can use as you review your content and make changes to make it more mobile-friendlyif you’re ready to review your email template and would like some help, call one of our coaches today [need appropriate 800#]If you want to learn more about how to make the most of your small business marketing (through email, social media, events and more), look for some of our fantastic seminars in your area…We’ll reference the “next” session as we get closer to a date…We set the stage today. What we didn’t discuss…More in-depth examples of where and how small businesses are using mobile – in-store, at events, to help grow their contact listsHow to create more engaging content with your mobile deviceWe’ll be pulling together some great examples and more tips for a session we’ll be running this fall…[click to next slide]
  • Presenter should introduce themselves. RDDs should mention Constant Contact ALEs would mention their own company and clarify their relationship to Constant Contact.(Ask people in the room if any of them have ever attended a previous seminar. If there are a lot,Clarify that this is new content but that some of the same strategies we have taught in the past still applySo they might see a few familiar strategies or tips along the way. (Then mention the workbook – explain what it is, briefly, and let them know that you will refer to itThroughout the session with short exercises for them to complete. Next ask …)How many people in the room are small businesses or work for a small business?How many are nonprofits ….on purpose (they will laugh) relate to the room that you know it’s been a tough year for some and that the informationCovered in the session should help them start to move the needle.
  • Presenter should introduce themselves. RDDs should mention Constant Contact ALEs would mention their own company and clarify their relationship to Constant Contact.(Ask people in the room if any of them have ever attended a previous seminar. If there are a lot,Clarify that this is new content but that some of the same strategies we have taught in the past still applySo they might see a few familiar strategies or tips along the way. (Then mention the workbook – explain what it is, briefly, and let them know that you will refer to itThroughout the session with short exercises for them to complete. Next ask …)How many people in the room are small businesses or work for a small business?How many are nonprofits ….on purpose (they will laugh) relate to the room that you know it’s been a tough year for some and that the informationCovered in the session should help them start to move the needle.
  • Presenter should introduce themselves. RDDs should mention Constant Contact ALEs would mention their own company and clarify their relationship to Constant Contact.(Ask people in the room if any of them have ever attended a previous seminar. If there are a lot,Clarify that this is new content but that some of the same strategies we have taught in the past still applySo they might see a few familiar strategies or tips along the way. (Then mention the workbook – explain what it is, briefly, and let them know that you will refer to itThroughout the session with short exercises for them to complete. Next ask …)How many people in the room are small businesses or work for a small business?How many are nonprofits ….on purpose (they will laugh) relate to the room that you know it’s been a tough year for some and that the informationCovered in the session should help them start to move the needle.
  • Ghost Partner: Making the case for Going Mobile

    1. 1. Great Big Huge stick around until the end for a special offer
    2. 2. Get These Slides make sure we have your email address
    3. 3. @constantcontact #ccmobile making the case for mobile beyond text messages © 2013
    4. 4. @constantcontact #ccmobile /GhostPartner @GhostPartner share #GhostLocal blogs.constantcontact.com/tag/mobile/ learn more 6 © 2013
    5. 5. @constantcontact #ccmobile 91% of U.S. adults own a cellphone theatlantic.com 129,000,000 # of smartphones owned in U.S. in 2012 56% own a smartphone Pewinternet.org 29% of Americans use only mobile devices to access the internet. ondeviceresearch.com comscore.com 7 © 2013
    6. 6. @constantcontact #ccmobile 83% of our audiences use mobile devices to manage their personal lives 80% of adults 18-44 have their smartphones with them 22 hours a day mediabistro.com 8 © 2013
    7. 7. @constantcontact #ccmobile 220,000,000! Google “small business mobile marketing” 9 © 2013
    8. 8. @constantcontact #ccmobile mobile responsive vs. mobile friendly mobile friendly 11 © 2013
    9. 9. @constantcontact #ccmobile 12 © 2013
    10. 10. @constantcontact #ccmobile US smartphone subscriptions expected to grow +28% in 2013 Mary Meeker 13 © 2013
    11. 11. @constantcontact #ccmobile people look at smartphones people look at mobile devices 150x 200x per day per day Alan Moore, No Straight Lines 14 © 2013
    12. 12. @constantcontact #ccmobile 40% of Americans under 35 used a mobile device to make a donation. 50% used a mobile device to browse non-profit websites and emails. 15 © 2013
    13. 13. @constantcontact #ccmobile 90% of mobile searches lead to an action searchengineland.com 75% 70% who ran a local search via mobile acted within one hour used phone to get real-time, location-based information CMO Council PewInternet.org local search 16 © 2013
    14. 14. @constantcontact #ccmobile 17 © 2013
    15. 15. @constantcontact #ccmobile 18 © 2013
    16. 16. @constantcontact #ccmobile 19 © 2013
    17. 17. @constantcontact #ccmobile 44% Litmus.com of email is opened on a mobile device. 20 © 2013
    18. 18. @constantcontact #ccmobile 80% of users delete mobile email that doesn’t look good. Blue Hornet 30% of users unsubscribe from email lists after receiving mobile email that doesn’t look good. Blue Hornet 21 © 2013
    19. 19. @constantcontact #ccmobile 22 © 2013
    20. 20. @constantcontact #ccmobile 66% 34% of small businesses are using mobile for their business. aren’t. small business use of mobile Constant Contact customer research 23 © 2013
    21. 21. @constantcontact #ccmobile • have no plans to adopt mobile in the future 65% 34% aren’t. • lack of customer demand 56% • “mobile isn’t relevant to my industry or business” 28% Constant Contact customer research 24 © 2013
    22. 22. @constantcontact #ccmobile Dorothy S. Jones April 1, 1947 – April 5, 2013 Services Dorothy S. Jones, age 66, passed away on Friday, April 5, 2013. She was at home and surrounded by her family. 25 © 2013
    23. 23. @constantcontact #ccmobile why not? we’re a nonprofit… not best for my products… we’re regulated by the government… cost is too high… 26 © 2013
    24. 24. @constantcontact #ccmobile calendar or time management customer communications GPS / mapping accounting or invoicing mobile for operations 82% 74% 52% 44% 27 © 2013
    25. 25. @constantcontact #ccmobile 28 © 2013
    26. 26. @constantcontact #ccmobile YOU DON'T GET TO DECIDE WHICH DEVICE PEOPLE USE TO ACCESS YOUR CONTENT. THEY DO. Karen McGrane, author of Content Strategy for Mobile @karenmcgrane 29 © 2013
    27. 27. @constantcontact #ccmobile at the end of the day, it’s about success 30 © 2013
    28. 28. @constantcontact #ccmobile 31 © 2013
    29. 29. @constantcontact #ccmobile tip #1 avoid using too much text 32 © 2013
    30. 30. @constantcontact #ccmobile tip #2 avoid multiple columns 33 © 2013
    31. 31. @constantcontact #ccmobile tip #3 clear and easy calls to action 34 © 2013
    32. 32. @constantcontact #ccmobile tip #4 9-point font, headlines don’t stand out Minimum: 22-point headlines, 11-point body text, improved contrast avoid tiny fonts 35 © 2013
    33. 33. @constantcontact #ccmobile tip #4 Better: 22-point headlines, 16-point body text avoid tiny fonts 36 © 2013
    34. 34. @constantcontact #ccmobile tip #5 use images carefully 37 © 2013
    35. 35. @constantcontact #ccmobile bonus #1 don’t ignore local search 38 © 2013
    36. 36. @constantcontact #ccmobile bonus #2 don’t ask customers or supporters to turn their phones off! 39 © 2013
    37. 37. @constantcontact #ccmobile 1.4 billion images taken on mobile per day Nokia’s Vesa Jutila, at DigitalK 2012 100 hours of video uploaded camera on the phone to take shots in-store per minute or with customers, social posts from businesses featuring images, etc. youtube.com bonus #3 don’t ignore mobile tech 40 © 2013
    38. 38. @constantcontact #ccmobile 44% 41 © 2013
    39. 39. @constantcontact #ccmobile 42 © 2013
    40. 40. @constantcontact #ccmobile less is more. focus – use less text use images carefully (don’t rely on them) use a single column claim your listings: be found on local search! clear and easy calls to action let your customers use their phones no small fonts (test, test, test!) don’t ignore your phone (pics, video, social) 43 © 2013
    41. 41. @constantcontact #ccmobile next steps have more questions? check out our answers to 10 of the most popular at the blog… (http://blogs.constantcontact.com/fresh-insights/10-mobile-marketing-questions) if you’re ready to review your email template for mobile, call a coach today: 855-816-6508 want to learn more? try other live local seminars near you… constantcontact.com/local-learning/seminars.jsp 44 © 2013
    42. 42. Get These Slides make sure we have your email address
    43. 43. Great Big Huge stick around until the end for a special offer
    44. 44. FREE Custom-designed, Website-matched Email Template in
    45. 45. March Workshops “Getting Started with Constant Contact” Thursday March 13th, 9:30-11:30am Chambrel Senior Center ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Workshop + Wine Free Wine Tasting after workshop Wednesday March 27th, 6:30-8:30pm Total Wine by Perimeter Mall 48
    46. 46. @constantcontact #ccmobile making the case for mobile beyond text messages © 2013
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