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  • 1. Workforce Review and Analysis: Manufacturing Sector February 2013 Houston Community College Office of Workforce Instruction In Partnership with the HCC Foundation
  • 2. Table of ContentsINTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................................. 3 The Manufacturing Sector ........................................................................................................................ 4 Purpose of this Report ............................................................................................................................... 5SUMMARY OF LITERATURE REVIEW ............................................................................................................. 5 Manufacturing Industry: Historical Trends ............................................................................................... 6TRENDS IN MANUFACTURING ...................................................................................................................... 7 Manufacturing Outlook: Texas and Houston ............................................................................................ 7 Training Requirements ............................................................................................................................ 10 Embedding Industry Certifications into College Workforce Training Programs ..................................... 11HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE WORKFORCE INSTRUCTION: ............................................................... 13WHERE ARE WE? ......................................................................................................................................... 13EMPLOYER ENGAGEMENT AND SKILLS SUMMIT ........................................................................................ 14 Additional Data Collection and Analysis ................................................................................................. 16RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE ACTION............................................................................................... 16 Career and Work Readiness Essential for Manufacturing Sector ........................................................... 17 Industry Certifications ............................................................................................................................. 17 Equipment and Facilities ......................................................................................................................... 19 Accreditations and Professional Development ....................................................................................... 20 Workforce Dual Credit Partnerships and Career Pathways .................................................................... 20 Grants and Employer Partnerships ......................................................................................................... 21SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................................... 21P a g e |2
  • 3. INTRODUCTIONIn mid-2011, the Instructional Leadership department of Houston 82% of manufacturersCommunity College (HCC) initiated a review of the workforce needs in the report a moderate-to- serious skills gap in skilledGreater Houston Area in an effort to review and analyze the alignment productionand relevancy of workforce training programs offered by the college. 69% of manufacturersSince one of the key initiatives in HCC’s 2012-2015 Strategic Plan is to expect the skills shortage inrespond to the needs of business and industry for skilled workers, HCC skilled production to worsen in the next 3-5 yearsdecided that a comprehensive review of our workforce programs wasneeded to determine the currency of the college’s programs related to 74% of manufacturersthe changes that have taken place in the local, regional, and national report that this skills gapeconomy during the last 10 to 15 years. The research imperative is to has negatively impacted their company’s ability toensure that we develop and follow a strategic blueprint, aligned with expand operationsHCC’S overall strategic plan, to sustain and direct HCC workforce programdevelopment that is responsive to both the Greater Houston Area’s and 5% of all jobs in manufacturing are unfilledthe state’s labor market needs. The overall objective will be to move from due to lack of qualifiedanalysis to transformation of our workforce programs that will position workersHCC as the leading institution in workforce and economic development.Throughout the assessment process, the seven driving questions of the review are: 1. What are the major workforce trends and labor market statistics for the Greater Houston Area by industry cluster? 2. Is the current program content reflective of the current industry occupation skills, knowledge, and industry certification requirements relevant to employers when making hiring decisions? 3. Is the right mix of workforce programs offered at the right campuses based on proximity of industry sectors using labor market and industry data? 4. What is the capacity of the programs (facilities, equipment, and faculty expertise and resources)? 5. Are there programs with potential for growth?P a g e |3
  • 4. 6. How can HCC increase the engagement of business and industry as active partners in the strategic planning of its workforce programs? 7. How does the organizational structure in place support innovation, industry engagement, constant evaluation, and growth?The following analysis, based on the answers to the above questions, identifies the gapsbetween what is currently offered at HCC, the capacity and structure in place, and thendetermine specific strategies for enhancement of the programs as needed.Our first step was to determine the high-growth, high-demand industry sectors in the GreaterHouston Area. They are: Energy, Manufacturing, and Trades; Transportation and Logistics;Health Care; Information Technology; Business and Personal Services; Public Safety; andBiotechnology. HCC has now started to conduct focused strategic workforce developmentforums called “Workforce Skills Summits,” each focused on a particular industry sector. Inthese forums, we engaged economic development leaders and employers in a discussion aboutthe workforce skills and knowledge that employers seek when making hiring decisions.The Manufacturing SectorWhat remains a lasting perception in the manufacturing industry is that machine and weldingjobs were labeled “blue collar” work and historically have been associated with low wages andlow job growth opportunities. The former “blue collar” work in this sector has beentransformed due to the influence of technology, the complexity of products, faster productioncycles, increased demand for customization, and distribution requirements of productsmanufactured.The new manufacturing jobs now require a higher-skilled, professional technician who has theability to think critically and solve quality issues during production. The traditional view of“blue collar workers” has transitioned to the need for a variety of professional technicianstrained in multiple aspects of production and expected to actively engage in higher work-applied reasoning, in a diversified work environment, with a demand for quicker productionP a g e |4
  • 5. outcomes. These professional technical jobs may be considered mid-level skill jobs, andincreasingly wages for technicians holding these jobs outperform those of individuals with four-year degrees (Carnavale, 2009).The Greater Houston Partnership lists Houston as the countrys #1 city for manufacturing plantsand jobs. Yet, manufacturing employers are continuously challenged to find qualified skilledworkers – even in times of high unemployment – mostly because there is a skills gap betweenthe available workforce and the skills sets they must have to be productive in today’smanufacturing industry workplace. Recognizing that access to qualified individuals with high-quality education, training, and skills set is critical to manufacturers’ capacity for innovation andbusiness success, HCC held its first “ Manufacturing Skills Summit” on September 28, 2012.Purpose of this ReportThis report is a summary of the literature review research related to manufacturing as well asthe results and feedback learned during the summit from the panelists and employers whoparticipated in the summit and who also completed a brief survey during the event. The reportincludes a brief section regarding the most recognized manufacturing workforce needs researchof the past five years, a review of the current HCC manufacturing-related programs offered, asummary of the Skills Summit outcomes, and lastly, recommendations for future action. Asimilar report format will follow each of the Skills Summit events.SUMMARY OF LITERATURE REVIEWIn spite of the recent recession, Houston’s economy has maintained a steady growth (Forbes, L.,2010). The energy, health care, oil and gas, and technology sectors – combined with strongtransportation and distribution infrastructure and top educational institutions – have helpedHouston weather the recession better than most cities. Moreover, these factors haveinfluenced the increased immigration of people from other U.S. cities to Houston seeking jobs,a high standard of living, and opportunities (University of Texas, 2011; Scheneider, A., 2012).P a g e |5
  • 6. The Greater Houston Partnership lists Houston as the #1manufacturing city in the U.S. Employers in this sector, “Manufacturers in the United States have a talent problem.however, continue to express that the most difficult Just as manufacturing growschallenge they face is finding qualified skilled workers for more complex and innovation drives the industry, companiesthe number of unfilled vacancies they currently hold. can no longer find workers with the skills today’s jobs demand.This challenge – to recruit qualified workers in This deficit in talent available to manufacturers poses a directmanufacturing – holds as true across the U.S. as it does in threat to the future prosperityHouston. The “2011 Skills Gap Report” by the National and security of the UnitedManufacturing Institute (NMI) in collaboration with States.”Deloitte Consulting LLP, substantiated the talent challenge -- Roadmap to Education Reform for Manufacturing, NIM (2012).that U.S. manufacturers face and warns of even greaterskilled worker shortages in the near future.Manufacturing Industry: Historical TrendsThough the industry is experiencing an upturn in demand, many Americans still remember thelarge number of jobs lost by the manufacturing sector in the 80’s and 90’s. Employers, facedwith increased labor costs driven by union contracts, moved production overseas seekinghigher production, union-free environments, and lower labor costs. In addition, technologyapplications in manufacturing also implied fewer people were needed in production. The flatworld economy and the subsequent increased global competition also impacted Americanexports as computer, textile, and fabric industries faced increased competition from foreignmarkets (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2000). As a result, many American jobs were lost toChina and India.But the world has significantly changed between 1980 and 2010. Thirty years later, a largenumber of baby boomers are at retirement age and technology advances have changed themanufacturing process, mostly resulting in increased productivity (Hurt, 2012). Local and globaldemand for products is now highly influenced by complex logistics and distribution algorithmsthat have led to the expectation of a faster and individualized consumer experience. WagesP a g e |6
  • 7. have increased globally as have the cost of transporting goods (due to oil and gas prices),changing the competitive imperatives for this sector.Respondents to the 2011 NMI Skills Gap Survey overwhelmingly (74%) indicated that thegreatest need they faced was the shortage of skilled production jobs which required a variety oftechnicians, including machinists, operators, craft workers, and distributors (NationalManufacturing Institute, 2011). These shortages present a critical challenge to theircompanies’ performance and ability to compete not only locally, but globally (NationalManufacturing Institute, 2011). Due to the shortages, production capacity limits their ability forexpansion, innovation, and productivity improvements (National Manufacturing Institute,2011).TRENDS IN MANUFACTURINGThere is a slow but steady growth takingplace in U.S. manufacturing. A recentreport published by Industry Weekindicates that according to theAssociation for ManufacturingTechnology, U.S. manufacturingtechnology orders totaled $667.47million in September 2012. This total reflected an increase of 40.7% from August 2012 and up13.4% when compared with the total of $588.80 million reported for September 2011. Overallyear-to-date orders are also up totaling $4,282.11 million, a 5.6% compared with 2011(Hessman, T., 2012).Manufacturing Outlook: Texas and HoustonAs part of our workforce review and analysis, Houston Community College commissionedEconomic Modeling Specialists Intl. (EMSI) to produce an economic and labor market analysis ofP a g e |7
  • 8. the manufacturing sectors within the HCC service area across Greater Houston. The followingsection and tables included here are direct references from this report.In the HCC service area, the manufacturing sector directly accounts for 214,144 jobs. Thesejobs ripple out through the economy to produce another 248,407 jobs. In effect, themanufacturing sector is responsible for supporting 462,551 jobs in the HCC service area, or15% of all employment (EMSI, 2012). Manufacturing Change Comparison: HCCS Service Area, Texas, and the U.S. (Source: EMSI, 2012 report) Region 2012 Jobs 2017 Jobs % Change Houston CCS 214,144 209,299 2.3% State 923,373 898,468 2.7% Nation 12,619,769 11,793,353 6.5%P a g e |8
  • 9. Below are the largest sub-sectors within manufacturing, as measured by number of workersemployed in 2012, with details on earnings per worker. .Meanwhile, the following are projected to be the fastest-growing sub-sectors withinmanufacturing, as measured by the number of new jobs (“Change” within the table) from 2012to 2017. 2012 2012 2017 % Description Change Average Jobs Jobs Change Earnings Oil and Gas Field Machinery and 34,772 36,084 1,312 4% $126,131 Equipment Manufacturing Plate Work Manufacturing 4,064 4,838 774 19% $73,752 Guided Missile and Space Vehicle 1,408 1,961 553 39% $149,688 Manufacturing Fabricated Pipe and Pipe Fitting 4,727 5,178 451 10% $77,070 Manufacturing Instruments and Related Products Manufacturing for Measuring, 3,333 3,769 436 13% $87,931 Displaying, and Controlling Industrial Process Variables Industrial Valve Manufacturing 5,119 5,495 376 7% $89,169 Industrial Gas Manufacturing 2,329 2,679 350 15% $156,996 Plastics Bag and Pouch 1,027 1,370 343 33% $59,178 Manufacturing Sign Manufacturing 1,725 2,010 285 17% $51,588 Other Concrete Product 1,031 1,300 269 26% $47,902 ManufacturingP a g e |9
  • 10. Training RequirementsJobs with growth opportunity and a good median hourly wage are also accessible with someworkforce training. The following are the jobs in these sectors that require a postsecondarynon-degree award: Median 2012 2017 % AnnualSOC Description Change Openings Hourly Jobs Jobs Change OpeningsCode Wage Architectural and Civil17-3011 2,605 2,516 (89) (3%) 255 51 $24.44 Drafters17-3013 Mechanical Drafters 2,233 2,307 74 3% 291 58 $26.83 Electrical and Electronics Repairers,49-2094 1,326 1,355 29 2% 194 39 $26.29 Commercial and Industrial Equipment Electronic Home Entertainment49-2097 580 658 78 13% 148 30 $15.16 Equipment Installers and Repairers Security and Fire Alarm49-2098 1,641 1,908 267 16% 469 94 $20.00 Systems Installers Aircraft Mechanics and49-3011 2,461 2,837 376 15% 747 149 $26.39 Service Technicians Automotive Service49-3023 Technicians and 13,107 13,712 605 5% 2,300 460 $15.05 Mechanics Bus and Truck49-3031 Mechanics and Diesel 5,181 5,373 192 4% 755 151 $20.01 Engine Specialists Mobile Heavy49-3042 Equipment Mechanics, 4,491 4,998 507 11% 1,090 218 $18.06 Except EnginesP a g e | 10
  • 11. The following are the jobs that require only short term and on-the-job training: MedianSOC 2012 2017 % Annual Description Change Openings HourlyCode Jobs Jobs Change Openings Wage Heating, Air Conditioning, and49-9021 Refrigeration 6,280 7,205 925 15% 1,481 296 $19.72 Mechanics and Installers Maintenance and49-9071 Repair Workers, 24,280 25,854 1,574 6% 3,807 761 $16.73 General Electrical and Electronic51-2022 3,431 3,325 (106) (3%) 266 53 $13.68 Equipment Assemblers51-2092 Team Assemblers 14,326 14,439 113 1% 1,609 322 $12.10 Welders, Cutters,51-4121 14,627 15,127 500 3% 2,451 490 $18.40 Solderers, and Brazers53-3031 Driver/Sales Workers 6,647 7,240 593 9% 1,254 251 $11.78 Light Truck or Delivery53-3033 12,968 13,586 618 5% 1,908 382 $14.49 Services Drivers Industrial Truck and53-7051 9,389 9,668 279 3% 1,608 322 $13.62 Tractor Operators Cleaners of Vehicles53-7061 8,235 8,426 191 2% 1,420 284 $9.90 and Equipment Laborers and Freight,53-7062 Stock, and Material 44,743 46,818 2,075 5% 9,227 1,845 $11.72 Movers, HandEmbedding Industry Certifications into College Workforce Training ProgramsThe need to increase competitive capacity is critical for manufacturers in the U.S. Productinnovation in manufacturing leads to increased competitiveness, higher wages, and creation ofhigh growth jobs, while also increasing indirect jobs. Industry leaders of the NationalAssociation of Manufacturers (NAM) have been wrestling with the skills gaps and, as a result,have developed a skills certification system. The system provides benchmark standardizedP a g e | 11
  • 12. assessments of the critical workplace traits and occupational skills an individual needs tooperate in the advanced manufacturing workplace driven by productivity and flexibility.Employers endorsed the skills certification system, agreeing that it confirms both technical andnon-technical skills. Aware of the critiques of some information technology credentials, theNAM-endorsed system is based on both theory and hands-on demonstration of skills whichprovides the employers an independent assurance that an individual has both the “booksmarts” and the “street smarts” to function in today’s high-paced and complex manufacturingenvironment. The industry endorsed this system as a way to assess skills of incoming workersas well as advance incumbent workers in the plants.The NAM-endorsed Manufacturing Skills Certification System includes a series of stackableindustry credentials which are applicable to all sectors in the manufacturing industry. Thesystem integrates a competency-based learning pathway model that is standards-based,performance-based, and proficiency-based. Furthermore, the certifications provide theindividual with nationally industry recognized credentials validating skills for high-quality,middle-class manufacturing jobs.These industry-recognized credentials validate the skills and competencies needed to beproductive and successful in entry-level positions in any manufacturing environment. Thecredentialing partners that comprise the Skills Certification System are American CollegeTesting (ACT), the American Welding Society (AWS), the Manufacturing Skill Standards Council(MSSC), the National Institute of Metalworking Skills (NIMS), and the Society of ManufacturingEngineers (SME).An emerging trend is integrating entry-level certifications into the college workforce trainingprograms curriculum. From the educational perspective, the additional benefit of the system isthat it provides a lifelong learning approach with multiple points of re-entry into education andwork leading to career and higher education advancement. Many community college studentsare adults who first come to the college in need of relevant workplace skills to open doors tojob vacancies for which they can’t otherwise qualify. The NAM-endorsed system provides aP a g e | 12
  • 13. career ladder pathway and a guide to community college workforce professionals to alignshort-term and long-term certificates and degrees with skills that are relevant to the industry.HOUSTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE WORKFORCE INSTRUCTION:WHERE ARE WE?HCC’s workforce instructional programs focus on Houston’s high-growth, high-demand industryclusters sectors: Energy, Health Care, Manufacturing, Transportation and Global Supply Chain &Logistics, Information Technology, Business, Hospitality, and Personal Services. More than 70credit workforce programs offer Associate in Applied Science degrees, and certificates areoffered throughout the Greater Houston Area and through HCC’s Distance Learning program.In addition, the HCC Corporate College works directly with employers to develop customizedtraining solutions based on skills and knowledge need assessments and a company’s strategicgoals. The School of Continuing Education offers fast track entry-level Marketable SkillsAchievement Awards in more than 20 areas which also serve as a college-entry pathway. TheHCC Apprenticeship Program is a partnership between HCC and the Apprenticeship andTraining Association of Texas (ATAT). The HCC Apprenticeship Program provides a three- to five-year job training system for skilled trade and craft workers.In 2011-2012, HCC awarded more than 3,731 workforce degrees and certificates. More than41% of HCC enrollment is comprised of workforce degree or certificate-seeking students, andthe number continues to grow annually. Just over 54% of these students are female and 46%are male. As of Fall 2011, there were 11,662 students enrolled in workforce coursework at HCC.As part of our continuing efforts to evolve with the region’s workforce needs, we have launchedseveral new programs in recent years. • The new Advanced Manufacturing Technology Institute at HCC Central College hosts machining and advanced manufacturing engineering technology programs and is an Authorized Training Center (ATC) for Engineering Geometry Systems.P a g e | 13
  • 14. • Through a unique partnership with Goldman Sachs, the HCC Center for Entrepreneurship offers a practical business management education program to help small business owners develop the skills they need to grow their companies. • The Division of Science and Engineering Technologies at HCC’s Northeast College provides high-tech career and technical education related to planning, managing, and providing applied STEM technical services for oil and gas, manufacturing, construction, chemical, petroleum, renewable and sustainable energy companies. • Through partnerships with industry leaders (such as Microsoft, CISCO, CompTia, Intuit, and others), HCC’s Digital Simulation and Gaming, Computer Science, Business Technology, and Accounting programs offer training that leads to industry certification in addition to college credentials. • The Certified Logistics Associate was added last year at HCC Southeast College in response to the needs of distribution centers and the expansion of the Port of Houston. • HCC Southwest College offers the technical training necessary for students considering a Drafting/Design career in the fields of architecture, construction, manufacturing, and engineering. The program provides a strong academic and technical base to give the graduate the needed skills and knowledge for immediate employment and the foundation for professional growth.HCC is also planning an alignment assessment for the HCC manufacturing-related workforcetraining programs in reviewing the programs with the results of this report. Similar outlines willbe used for other workforce programs as part of the industry cluster reviews.EMPLOYER ENGAGEMENT AND SKILLS SUMMITThe HCC Manufacturing Skills Summit Breakfast was held September 28, 2012, at Brady’sLanding in southeast Houston, a hub for local manufacturing activity. John Higgins, Presidentand CEO of NEUTEX Advanced Energy, delivered the keynote for the event. During hispresentation, Mr. Higgins indicated that NEUTEX had recently relocated to the U.S., returning toP a g e | 14
  • 15. Houston from China. Increased shipping costs, quality control issues due to lower standards,constant travel costs, increased tariffs, and contraband search costs were motivating factors inthe company’s decision to return to the U.S. In addition, the company realized they werehelping in the development of a middle class in China, instead of helping to build and maintainit right here in Houston. Mr. Higgins explained that NEUTEX moved to Houston because thequality of production is better, people are more efficient, and the city possesses a great logisticsdistribution location supported by a strong transportation infrastructure system.Overall, nearly 130 people attended the Skills Summit, including employers representing thevarious sectors of the local manufacturing industry. Other panelists for the event included thefollowing individuals and organizations: • Tom Pauken, Commissioner Representing Employers for the Texas Workforce Commission; • Cally Graves, Senior Industry Liaison, Houston Galveston Area Council; • John Higgins, President and CEO, NEUTEX Advanced Energy Group; • Jeff Applegate, President, Blackwell Plastics and also president of GHMA; • Ron Lehman from Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center; • Craig Richard, Chief Economic Development Officer, Greater Houston Partnership; and • Kevin Helm, Supply Chain Manager, Oceaneering International.This event was the first in a series of skills summits focused on the workforce and skills needsfor high-demand, high-growth industries in the Houston area and how HCC’s curriculum cancontinue to be enhanced to meet the needs of the emerging labor force. This summit washosted by HCC in partnership with the Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center, Texas WorkforceCommission, Houston-Galveston Area Council, and the Greater Houston ManufacturingAssociation.The summit is the final step the workforce programs use to initiate curriculum changes andcontinue to align workforce education curriculum with relevant skills training objectives foreach industry cluster. These findings will help guide us in enhancing the relevancy of all (SCHand CE) related programs and corresponding credentialing opportunities for our students.P a g e | 15
  • 16. Additional Data Collection and AnalysisParallel to the research and skills summit planning, an assessment of facilities and equipmentwas conducted for the largest concentration of manufacturing-related training programclassroom facilities at HCC Central College. Review of facilities and capacity at HCC NE College’sWelding lab and HCC SE College Welding, and other related programs, is also underdevelopment.With increased calls from employers to the HCC Corporate College for customized training, oneaction item that has already been implemented is the launch of plans to develop a newAdvanced Manufacturing Technology Institute (AMTI). AMTI is a collaboration between HCCCorporate College, HCC Central, HCC NE College, HCC SE College and HCC’s School of ContinuingEducation to help prepare future manufacturing career professionals and upgrade incumbentworker skills.During the 2012-2013 fiscal year, an update of the facilities as well as repairs and upgrading ofHCC’s 60 welding booths and related equipment began. In addition, upgrades and repairs to themachinery housed in the Machining and Advanced Manufacturing labs at Central College wereinitiated. Advanced CNC machines are also used at SW College as part of the drafting program.NCCER credentialing for all faculty in these programs has also been completed, together withthe immersion of the NCCER curriculum to the courses to commence industry credentialing ofstudents in the program in the 2012-2013 fiscal year. Additional faculty training andcredentialing is under assessment based on the information presented in this report.RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE ACTIONThe information below reflects the findings, survey feedback, and comments followed byimplications for curriculum and specific action items. A district-wide Manufacturing CurriculumEnhancement Task Force has been organized which includes instructional deans and programfaculty to review current alignment of curriculum based on research data and the skills summitevent. The Task Force will be focused on developing an action plan and timeline to implementnecessary enhancements within 12 months or less.P a g e | 16
  • 17. Career and Work Readiness Essential for Manufacturing SectorHCC will review its curriculum to ensure that we continue to emphasize the development ofthese skills in our workforce students: • Basic Applied Math: Qualified manufacturing workers must have the ability to perform work-related basic arithmetic and technical math calculations (not college algebra) and apply them to work-related situations (division, multiplication, percentages, fractions). • Work Habits: Qualified manufacturing workers must possess behavioral work skills such as reliability, the ability to work in teams, and the ability to communicate effectively with a diversified group of co-workers and supervisors. • Problem Solving: Qualified workers must be trained and demonstrate problem solving and critical thinking skills. • Reading and Basic Work Information Analytical Skills: Qualified workers must demonstrate the ability to locate, synthesize, and apply workplace document information that is presented in graphics and in text.Industry CertificationsThe integration of technology and the demand for high productivity that dominate theadvanced manufacturing sector increasingly require a higher-skilled, safe, and trainedmanufacturing workforce. Manufacturing skills gaps researchers and HCC Skills Summitemployer attendees indicated that industry certifications add validation of the skills andcompetencies that entry-level workers need to be productive and successful in anymanufacturing environment. a. The Manufacturing Skills Certification System endorsed by the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) is a series of credentials applicable across all sectors in the manufacturing economy. It can be used for new-hire screening and assessment as well as to enhance current worker skill sets. The NAM-endorsed system directly addresses the deficits in manufacturing education and training that are limiting the pool ofP a g e | 17
  • 18. qualified candidates for U.S. manufacturing jobs. Certifications are valuable to employers since they are designed to measure a minimum standard of competencies identified by employers as critical when making hiring decisions. HCC’s machining and manufacturing programs will pursue meeting the requirements of the Manufacturing Skills Certification. b. The American Welding Society (AWS) Certified Welder (CW) program test is used in the structural steel, petroleum pipeline, sheet metal, and chemical refinery welding industries. HCC will incorporate the CWS certification preparation for the Basic Welding Level 1 Certificate. The AWS Accredited Test Facility program establishes minimum requirements for test facilities, their personnel, and equipment to qualify for accreditation to test and qualify welders. HCC will assess the necessary requirements to establish an AWS Testing Facility where HCC students can test prior to completing the program, allowing them to earn a Level 1 Certificate and AWS Certified Welder certificate upon completion of their HCC education and increase employability. c. Skills Summit Survey respondents supported NIMS certifications as relevant credentials used for hiring and screening of new personnel. Specific certifications included: Machining Level I & II, Metal Forming Level 1, and Stamping Level 2-3. The National Institute for Metalworking Skills (NIMS) credential is the metalworking industry’s only skills certificate that is based on national standards developed under procedures accredited by the American National Standards Institute. The NIMS credential is used by the industry to recruit, hire, place, and promote skilled candidates at all levels of employment. The NIMS credential is used by education and training institutions as performance benchmarks, often as part of graduation or degree requirements, and/or as the basis for advanced credit. Therefore, the Machining Program will assess the alignment of the NIMS certifications for different levels of HCC’s machining curriculum. d. The Skills Summit Survey respondents also acknowledged the Manufacturing Skills Standard Council (MSSC) Certified Production Technician (CPT) as a relevantP a g e | 18
  • 19. certification for their industry. The CPT certification allows individuals to validate mastery of the core competencies of manufacturing production at the front line (entry-level through front-line supervisor). The CPT program consists of five individual certificate modules: Safety; Quality Practices and Measurement; Manufacturing Processes and Production; Maintenance Awareness; and Green Production. HCC Manufacturing Technology program faculty will assess the alignment of the CPT skills to the courses in the Associate in Applied Science degree in Manufacturing. e. OSHA’s General Industry Outreach Safety training is also a fundamental certification for an entry-level worker’s general awareness on recognizing and preventing hazards in a general industry setting. The Task Force will assess NCCER OSHA training content and identify what additional alignments are needed (if any) and make recommendations regarding the 10-Hour General Industry certification. f. With a large number of adults seeking to obtain new skills or upgrade existing skills, online education delivery options will be assessed to determine courses which could be offered via distance education. Convenient and accessibility of instruction will be assessed by the Task Force as another vehicle to expand access to training and relevant education. In summary, industry certifications are valuable to employers since they are designed to measure a minimum standard of competencies that have been identified by employers as critical when making hiring decisions. Specific relevant industry certifications noted included: • OSHA - 10-hour General Industry Card • AWS - Certified Welder • NIMS - Machining Level I & II, Metal Forming Level 1, and Stamping Level 2-3 • MSSC - Certified Production TechnicianEquipment and FacilitiesIn partnership with the district inventory control, the Task Force will also develop anassessment of the manufacturing-related instructional programs current equipment, and makeP a g e | 19
  • 20. recommendations for the replacement, repairs, or addition of equipment to meet the needs ofthe industry.Following a new industry cluster approach for workforce program curriculum and equipmentand facilities development, a Center for Manufacturing Excellence will be developed incollaboration with all college sites and with credit and non-credit departments. The objectiveof the Center for Excellence will be to leverage HCC’s district-wide resources and expertise tomeet the various areas of relevant manufacturing training without unnecessary duplication. Inaddition, program facilities capacity and need for improvement, as well as planning of newcollege expansions, will be reviewed by the Task Force to provide further recommendations.Accreditations and Professional DevelopmentThe Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor of Workforce Instruction will coordinate the processof relevant third-party accreditations and faculty professional development and certificationsfor all manufacturing-related programs. The welding program facility at Central College willpursue approval as an American Welding Society Testing Site. The machining andmanufacturing programs will pursue meeting the requirements of the Manufacturing SkillsCertification System endorsed by the National Association of Manufacturers and also theNational Institute for Metalworking Skills. Professional development objectives for faculty willfocus on standards from AWS, MSSC, NAM, and NIMS.Workforce Dual Credit Partnerships and Career PathwaysThrough curriculum enhancement and increased instructional capacity, the college willcontinue to expand workforce career pathways partnerships with local school districts toprovide high schools students the opportunity to earn a college certificate while completingtheir high school diploma. Current dual credit partnerships, such as the Houston InnovativeLearning Zone Schools with HISD, provide pathways to college for many students who seekalternative academic pathways to college that will allow them to also quickly qualify foremployment and earn industry credentials.P a g e | 20
  • 21. Grants and Employer PartnershipsOnce the accreditations and industry certifications are embedded into the curriculum, HCC willalso increase its capacity to deliver relevant employer contract training projects. In addition,federal, state, and private foundation grant opportunities will be assessed to help support thecontinual upgrading of the curriculum, faculty professional development, and student industrycertifications options. Through the new industry cluster organizations, an Industry AdvisoryCommittee will also be developed to continue to provide a more global perspective of industrytrends and HCC’s manufacturing programs relevance to meeting employer needs.SUMMARYAlmost one-third of new job openings between 2010 and 2020 are going to require professionaltechnical skills, as baby boomers retire and new jobs are created. Manufacturing is essentialand very important to the economic development of both our region and state. Modernmanufacturing is experiencing a renaissance and technology has transformed the workplaceand the necessary skills sets for manufacturing workers.Industry credentials have become a third-party benchmark of the learning objectives of thetraditional academic education and training. As a result, Houston Community College is in theprocess of updating our curriculum to provide students in these programs the necessaryeducational foundation for success and long-term career pathways. HCC also has theopportunity to add relevant industry certifications as part of the completion of theirprofessional certificate and/or associate degree program. Furthermore, the college hascommitted to make necessary facilities and equipment enhancements to build additionalcapacity to meet the high demand for graduates of these programs by regional employers.HCC is ideally positioned to provide both applied career and technical preparation as well as theapplied mathematics, basic technology skills, critical thinking, work readiness, problem solving,and teamwork competencies that the new millennium workplace demands. The integration ofP a g e | 21
  • 22. relevant, focused, and applied academic learning and workforce readiness offered by HCC canlead to both further education and job skills, resulting in better prepared graduates andsuccessful employees.Active employer engagement and partnerships in the form of additional internship and co-opexperiences, equipment donation, and/or faculty resources will also be a focus of HCCworkforce instruction developments. These opportunities will provide students with appliedexperience in supervised formats while giving employers a closer view of the pipeline of futuretrained and skilled staff. In addition, internship programs provide employers a real opportunityto provide direct feedback to instructional leaders of the learning outcomes achieved by thestudents and/or the need to enhance curriculum.As the community college of Houston, and for Houston, HCC has been offering workforcetraining doing for decades, providing the educational means for individuals to enter theworkforce. The new focus on high-growth, high-demand workforce training such asmanufacturing will serve the citizens and regional economic development well.In summary, the summit feedback provided direct employer feedback that the college isincorporating into its curriculum. HCC workforce efforts are committed to enhance employerengagement, align curriculum to relevant industry certifications, build collaborative career andtechnical education pathways with the local schools districts, and offer a system of stackableworkforce certificates towards associates degrees with articulations to four year universities tomeet the manufacturing workforce needs and provide students successful job and careeropportunities.P a g e | 22