Twitter 101   research plan engage measure  03 may2010-p
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Twitter 101 research plan engage measure 03 may2010-p

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This deck is meant for new users of Twitter who are trying to understand how to leverage it for business purposes...

This deck is meant for new users of Twitter who are trying to understand how to leverage it for business purposes
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  • Frank
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  • http://search.twitter.com/
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  • Many general business accounts use the business logo as their twitter icon. Individuals who are acting on the companies behalf, should use a professional head shot and include a their company affiliation in the bio as well as through a branded background.
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  • If you have any problems with identifying people to follow let us know and we will recommend you a short list of recommendations.
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Twitter 101   research plan engage measure  03 may2010-p Twitter 101 research plan engage measure 03 may2010-p Presentation Transcript

  • Contact: Bill Chamberlin, Principal Consultant, Market Insights May 3, 2010 Twitter 101 - Research, Plan, Engage, Measure How Businesses Can Get Started Using Twitter https://w3-03.ibm.com/marketing/mi/mihome.nsf/pages/Social+Insights
  • About This Presentation
    • This deck is meant for new users of Twitter who are trying to understand how to leverage it for business purposes
    • URLs are hotlinked. When you are in screenshow, you can click on a link to be taken to the website.
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter:
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter Language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Etiquette, tips, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Etiquette, tips, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • Every day, millions of people use Twitter to create, discover and share ideas with others. Now, people are turning to Twitter as an effective way to reach out to businesses, too. From local stores to big brands, and from brick-and-mortar to internet-based or service sector, people are finding great value in the connections they make with businesses on Twitter ” “ Twitter  for  business  -  Twitter  101 for Businesses
  • What is Twitter?
    • A Publication Platform
      • Free “micro-blogging” application
      • Say something in in 140 characters or less.
      • Publish it to the world or send in private.
    • A Research Tool
      • Listen to (see) what others are talking about
      • Find others who are passionate about the topics you are.
    • A Social Networking Platform
      • Used by people worldwide to communicate and connect with each other
  • Some reasons why businesses should be on Twitter
    • Your customers, partners, and employees are on Twitter
    • Increasingly, business users are searching Twitter for information
        • It’s a way for users to find and comment on content
        • Brands need to be aware of what is being said on this platform
    • Twitter helps build and maintain relationships
      • Form new relationships and strengthen existing relationships
      • Keeping in regular contact is a natural part of business processes
    • Twitter widens your network.
      • Your community connects to other communities.
      • You can connect to 20 people who connect to 200, and so on.
    • Twitter is fluid, real time and fast.
      • Get the latest news on Twitter
      • Tweets take little time and are often easier to read and send than email.
  • Why Is Twitter Successful?
    • Twitter's success is the result of
      • Simplicity of the website.
      • Ease of use.
      • Real-time information/news.
      • Basic social networking capabilities .
      • Availability across different platforms.
      • Ability to integrate into other websites.
  • Twitter growth rates have slowed a bit from the rush it experienced in early 2009, but the numbers are still impressive
    • Twitter has  105,779,710 registered users , up more than 1,500%  from a year ago.
    • 300,000 new users sign up every day.
    • 180 million unique visitors drop by per month.
    • Has an estimated 19 billion searches per month  
    Source: http://www.pcworld.com/article/194370 Source: Hubspot -  State of the Twittersphere
  • With all the growth of Twitter usage and brand awareness, Facebook still commands significantly higher traffic Source: Nielsen Source: Twitter Usage in America: 2010 - Complete Report Source: Twitter Usage in America: 2010 - Complete Report
  • While Twitter is global, usage varies by country
    • The table shows percentage of 13 million unique Twitter users that tweeted during the period from Oct. 16, 2009 to Dec. 16, 2009.
    • Source: Exploring the Use of Twitter Around the World, Sysomos, January 2010
  • Twitter user demographics: Shifting towards a younger crowd.
    • Twitter started out being more popular with adults, before it caught on with younger users. Last year that changed as celebrity tweets caught on, and mainstream media started talking about the service more.
    • At the end of 2009, more than 30% of Twitter’s visitors were under 25, this chart suggests, up from about 20% of its visitors at the end of 2008.
  • Twitter usage behavior facts provide insights into “Twitterers”
    • In January 2010, users followed 170 profiles, on average, compared with about 45 in July 2009.
      • 81% of Twitter users are following less than 100 people
    • Users had an average of 300 followers in January 2010, versus about 70 in July 2009.
      • 82% of Twitter users have less than 100 followers
    • In January 2010, the average user had made 420 Twitter updates, compared with 120 in July 2009.
    • Thursday and Friday are the most active days on Twitter, each accounting for 16% of total tweets in the Hubspot study.
    • 10-11 pm is the most active hour on Twitter, accounting for 4.8% of the tweets in an average day.
    Source: Hubspot -  State of the Twittersphere
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Etiquette, tips, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • Begin by searching Twitter using Twitter’s search engine Twitter creates an instant searchable record of the real-time conversations users have on the service Using Twitter Search a company can easily see what people are saying about the company’s brands, products, events in real time
  • Experiment with Twitter’s Advanced Search
  • Example Twitter Search: Smarter Planet
  • You can use Twitter search for basic monitoring and searching of a specific keyword, hashtag, or person.
  • Use the RSS Feed feature to subscribe and monitoring updates To keep track of a specific search’s update, subscribe to the RSS feed for the search and manage it and aggregator such as Google Reader. Copy RSS feed Load into Google Reader
  • Continue to research Twitter content by using other Twitter search tools other than just Twitter search
    • Here’s a few of the many search tools that are available
    • Google Search: A Google real-time search tool includes Twitter
      • Also…. Try a Google search using the parameter site:twitter.com + search word.
    • Tweepsearch Search Twitter profiles.
    • Hashtags.org  (as the name suggests) keeps track of all twittered hashtags ( # ). The tool also trends each one and shows you most popular ones:
    • Twitseek  searches for URLs twittered along with the keyword.
    • Tweet Scan  is a simple Twitter search tool (updates results every second);
    • Twit Scoop  searches and tracks the keyword-related conversations. It will also show you the trend for your keyword popularity on Twitter.
    • Twitseeker A search engine for finding and browsing twitter users based on their most recent tweets,
    • LocaFollow Search by Bio, Location, Name or Tweets (Keywords).
    • For other Social Search Engines, see Social Media Search Engines
  • Find out how others are using Twitter and Social Media platforms
    • Web
      • Business Week:   Brands that Tweet
      • Forrester: How to Use Twitter for Customer Service: Carphone WareHouse
      • HorizonWatching Social Media Case Studies and Lessons Learned
      • Jeremiah Owyang,  50 Ways to Use Social Media Listed by Objective
      • Mashable:   How to use Twitter for Customer Service
      • Mashable:  40 of the Best Twitter Brands and the People Behind Them
      • Search Engine Journal:  16 Examples of Huge Brands Using Twitter for Business
      • Social Media Explorer:   Exploring Customer Service Efforts Using Twitte
      • Social Media Today:  Five examples of innovation with Twitter
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Etiquette, tips, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • Have a plan for what you are using Twitter for. Link your Twitter usage to your overall business objectives. Business Process Potential Uses Marketing Research Track keyword issues, customers, influencers, etc. Monitor conversations around topics ( e.g., your brand, your key customers, your main competitors, etc.) Communications Distribute news, press releases, real-time information, crisis management, news during events, product announcements Networking Forming new relationships and ‘ecosystems’ with all stakeholders, including influencers (analysts, bloggers, journalists), peers, colleagues, customers, Marketing Promotion, coupons, search engine optimization, brand marketing, Influencer marketing, event marketing, social content distribution Customer Sales & Support Connect , strengthen relationships, get feedback , conduct polls, provide assistance, link to information, etc. Partner Support Connect , strengthen relationships, get feedback, conduct polls, provide assistance, link to information, etc. Human Resources Recruit! Promote company & careers, post jobs Product Management Generate new ideas, test ideas, get feedback All Business Processes Anything that can be measured by a sensor, can be tweeted
  • Signing up is easy Set up an account at http://twitter.com
  • Take some time to create a unique username and to complete your profile information, including account settings Choose a username. Keep it simple and short. If you will be tweeting officially for your company, pick a name that aligns with your branding. While you can change your username later, try to pick something that will stick.
  • The Full Name Field is not your username, but is important field used to identify who you are to others who are searching for Followers
    • Use full names to be findable!
      • Enterprises - Use recognized brand / company names
      • Individuals - Bill Chamberlin (not BillC)
    • In general, don’t use acronyms...
      • IBM Storage, not STG at IBM
      • Industry acronyms like SOA are ok
    • Use spaces to separate words, not characters (& , _ / )
      • IBM Consulting (not IBMconsulting or IBM/Consulting)
    • Idea: Combine an industry term with the brand name
      • This may be difficult to do, given the character limit
      • Example: IBM BladeCenter Servers or IBM SystemZ Mainframe
  • The User name is the name others will use to communicate with you on a regular basis
    • Don’t use an underscore as iPhones have trouble reading them.
      • ibmtivoli or IBMTivoli (not IBM_Tivoli)
    • Don’t use IBM acronyms
      • IBMConsulting (not StevenGBS)
      • IBMStorage (not IBMSTG)
    • Suggested convention: IBMBusinessUnit/Brand
      • IBMSupport or IBMStorage
    • Pick a name which will help people find you.
      • Search for yourself or ask people to try searching for you.
    • If you picked a bad user name you can change it.
      • Rename yourself in your account settings.
      • Tweet your followers as FYI.
  • On your profile you have one URL field that you can use to drive visitors to a specific website.
    • Pick a URL that can help people understand what you are associated to.
      • www.Ibm.com/systems/storage
      • www.Ibm.com/tivoli
      • www.ibm.com/security/
  • Pay attention to the bio field! It becomes the description meta tag which ultimately becomes the search result description in Google!
    • You have 160 characters to work with, of which approx 140 will be displayed by Google.
    • Be as descriptive as possible.
    • Examples:
  • Geotagging (one of the account profile settings) allows you to let people (and businesses) know where you are tweeting from
    • Twitter's opt-in Geotagging feature selectively ‘Geotags’ a user’s tweets with their exact location.
      • Provides more context to followers.
      • Allows users join into a local conversation.
      • Annotates location as you travel from place to place.
    • Why is this important for sales?
      • Helps customers find sellers in their area.
      • Helps identify the presence best associated a locale.
      • Builds credibility.
    • New twitter apps are already supporting this.
      • Examples: Birdfeed , Seesmic Web , Foursquare , Gowalla , Twidroid , Twittelator Pro Tweetdeck
    • Note geotagging is disabled by default.
      • This means you will need to opt-in in order to use it.
      • To activate the new geotagging functionality, go to your Settings page and click "Enable Geotagging".
  • While you have the ability to protect your tweets, do not choose this option.
    • Doing so greatly restricts your visibility and reach.
        • Potential contacts (customers) will not be able to see your tweets.
        • Contacts will be unlikely to follow you.
  • Twitter has a number of settings that you can turn on so that you will be alerted to activity.
    • You can get email alerts:
      • New Follower Emails: Email when someone starts following me.
      • Direct Text Emails: Email when I receive a new direct message.
    • You can also tweet and get tweets via your mobile phone
  • Upload a picture for your profile
    • Use a picture of yourself when tweeting as an individual
      • Be recognizable. Use a close up image of your face.
      • Be approachable & professional. No odd expressions.
      • The setting should be appropriate and not distracting.
      • Be human. No avatars or cartoons.
    • Use a logo when tweeting for an organization / brand .
    • How to choose?
      • If you tweet on several subjects, including about an IBM topic/org, use an image of yourself.
      • If you are covering an org’s presence, use a logo. Add your name in the bio field and your picture in the background/theme.
      • Tip: The image should be no larger than 700KB
  • Consider adding something more than the standard background for your profile page. Include something related to your brand and provide additional information that you can’t fit in the standard Twitter profile. Design a personal background to represent your company and tell people why you’re on Twitter
  • Additional tips for creating a background for your profile page
    • Go to the Design tab to pick a theme or upload a picture for your background.
    • When creating a background image:
    • Include contact information / bio
    • Consider rotating the background image / using a template.
    • Do not tile the background image.
    • Use the upper left to give key info.
    • Consider Corporate vs. Personal background.
    • You can create a simple image via Paint or Powerpoint.
    • Specifications:
    • Overall background: Max size = 800KB, 2048 x 1707 pixels
    • Top image: 14 pixels from the top.
    • Left column: 80 pixels x 587 pixels
    • Note: Your design group may want to create a “standard” background.
  • Once you’ve set up your account, find contacts to ‘Follow’ by searching for topics, companies, and people Find a key influencer on Twitter related to the topic you are interested, then find people to follow from their profile Click ‘following’ to see a list of Twitter IDs Mouse over this partial list to see the Twitter ID, or click to go straight to the profile Explore the lists that ibmsecurity has been listed on.
  • Spend time to find others to ‘Follow’ by searching for topics, companies, and people
    • Three examples of how you can find contacts
    • Twitter Search
      • Search with keywords then notice the people associated with the posts.
      • See http://search.twitter.com
    • Twitter tools like TwitSeeker
      • Search by keyword. See the number of topic tweets and followers for each user.
      • Follow selected users or bulk follow the entire results page.
      • See http://twitseeker.com/
    • 3 rd party apps like LocaFollow
      • Search by Bio, Location, Name or Tweets (Keywords).
      • You can bulk follow the returns, create a list or share with others.
      • See http://www.locafollow.com/
  • Once you have found people to follow just click the “Follow” button . Follow only relevant people. From that moment you will start seeing their tweets in your Twitter stream. If you follow everyone, your inbox will quickly become unmanageable. Follow people relevant to you and your network. Follow Button
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Etiquette, tips, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • You are now ready to start tweeting
    • To start tweeting, just type in your message into the box and hit enter
    • Twitter gives you 140 characters. It will show you how many characters you have left
    • Don’t feel like you have to answer the question “What’s happening?”
  • Tweeting basics
    • There is a 140 character limit.
      • So craft carefully.
    • Use key words in your posts.
      • The first 27 characters are picked up by search engines.
      • Do not shorten your key words.
    • To be social is to be human
      • People develop relationships with other people.
      • A faceless corporation will probably be ignored.
      • Share! Provide useful, timely information.
      • Be consistent and don’t spam
    • Make connections which build relationships.
      • Think about your audience when you tweet.
      • Selectively retweet! Lets followers see the posts of people in your network.
      • Follow people to be followed.
  • 90% of what you need to know about the Twitter conversational language is in the table below
    • .
    What Description Example Use @ = Reply Send a message directly to someone. Use this to have conversations with other Twitter users, Note: Only those that follow you and your follower will see the message.
      • @horizonwatching Thanks for the link to the report on smarter cities
    .@ = Reply (notify all your Followers).
      • If you want everyone who is following you to see the reply message you must use .@username (note the dot before the @ sign).
      • . @horizonwatching Thanks for the link to the report on smarter cities
    Mention
      • When you mention another Twitter ID in your tweet everyone on Twitter can see your message.
      • Thanks @horizonwatching for a great presentation on Emerging Trends.
    RT = Retweet Used to repost someone’s update/post to all your followers. Use this to share a someone else’ s great tweet. You can do this manually (see right) or just click the Twitter “Retweet This” link
      • RT @horizonwatching: MIT Technology Review: 10 Emerging Technologies of 2010 http://bit.ly/dnDQfs .
    DM = Direct Message Use for sending a private message between users that follow each other. The message is not public. Just type “d username” or “DM username” and then your message.
      • D Horizonwatching Call me when you get back to the office
    Favorites This is a way to save your favorite tweets and let others check them out. Consider it your “Twitter museum” Bit.ly- http://bit.ly/ Allows you to turn long URLs into short ones, saving space in your tweets. There are many URL shorteners, but Bit.ly is popular because it enables tracking by recording how many people clicked the tweeted link MIT Technology Review: 10 Emerging Technologies of 2010 http://bit.ly/dnDQfs .
  • Your Twitter menu links explained
    • Following: shows you all the Twitter IDs you are Following.
    • Followers: shows you all the Twitter IDs that are Following you.
    • Listed shows all the lists created by others that where your userid has been listed
    • @Username: displays all of the tweets where a user has replied to you or referred to you using @
    • Direct Messages: displays all the messages that have been sent you in private
    • Favorites: shows all the Tweets you have saved and ‘favorited’
    • Retweets: shows you all the Tweets you have Retweeted
  • Twitter lists allow users to group related Twitter IDs into lists
    • Twitter lists can group the stream of contacts around an organization/topic:
      • AT&T customers
      • IBM Twitterers
      • TopicX SMEs
    • Creating and following lists:
      • To stay connected to groups of people.
      • To stay connected to discussions from the list you created (e.g. a project team, a topic).
      • To be a resource for people to follow.
      • Note: A list can be either private or public.
    • Being added to a list:
      • People add you to lists when they view you as important / relevant to a topic area.
      • This is usually good as it extends your reach.
      • If you are on lists you don’t want to be on, you must block the creator of the list.
  • There are a number of third party apps for Twitter lists
    • Listorius: http://listorious.com/
    • Listomatic @ http://listomatic.syndeolabs.com/
      • Organize your followers Into lists
    • TLists @ http://beta.tlists.com/
      • Create, follow, apply to and manage lists
    • ListiMonkey @ http://listimonkey.com /
      • Monitor Twitter Lists for keywords
      • Get email alerts when a keyword appears in Lists of your choice
  • Use hashtags like you would tags on any other social platform in order to allow others to find your content
    • Hash Tags help Twitter users organize their conversations into searchable groups
    • Look for the hashtags used around your topics by searching hashtags.org , which provides real-time tracking of Twitter hashtags
    • When users click the tag (or search for the tag) they can watch the conversations across all twitter users, not just people they are following
    • To use a hash or start a Hash tag simply type # followed by the topic name
    • Set up RSS feeds if you like.
    • Discuss with your colleagues and employ a consistent “hashtag taxonomy” around company/brand topics.
      • You can find a list of STG related #hash tags on the Smarter Systems Social Influence Community site
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter Language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Etiquette, tips, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • Set up and track some basic Twitter measurements
    • Try to tie your measurements back to the reasons you started Twittering in the first place. What were your overall objectives?
    • Here's a basic framework for measuring Twitter success:
      • Attention.   The amount of traffic to your tweets generate for a given period of time.  Example, number of click’s on URLs.
      • Participation.   The extent to which users engage with your content in a channel. Number of @Replies
      • Authority.   Number of the inbound links to your content. For example, number of ReTweets.
      • Influence.   The size of the user base subscribed to your content.  Followers on Twitter
  • Other tools are available to measuring Twitter results
    • Use a shortener like bit.ly  which included built in tracking codes so you can monitor clicks, and who is Twittering about the URL that you put in your link.
    • Twitalyzer lets you measure your influence, not just measuring clicks. Definitely worth a look!
    • Use a tool like  ReTweetRank  to measure the amount of retweets about you per day, and try and grow your ranking on there.
    • Use a tool like  TwitterCounter  to measure the amount of new people following you per day, and average growth per day.
    • TweetBeep  measures the amount of times your Twitter name or product or brand is mentioned, and what is being said, and automatically emails you anytime this happens.
    • twInfluence is an interesting tool that tracks how many followers are actually listening to their messages with measures of “Reach”, “Velocity”, and “Social Capital”.
    • TweetEffect : Using this tool, you can find how many people are responding and reacting to your posts. This helps you identify what is and what isn’t resonating with your followers.
    • TweepSearch: Provides charts on Tweets per hour, day and month. Also stats on who you are replying too and retweeting most often.
  • Table of Contents
    • An Introduction to Twitter
      • What is it?
      • Facts & Figures
    • Getting Started With Twitter
    • Research : Find/Listen To The Conversations
      • Searching for people and topics
    • Plan: What Do You Want To Do?
      • Sign up and plan your tweeting.
    • Engage: Start Tweeting
      • Twitter language, # hash tags
    • Measure: How Are You Doing?
    • Getting Better
            • Tips, etiquette, dos and don'ts
            • Twitter tools
            • Case studies
    Research Plan Engage Measure
  • Getting others to follow you….
    • How many followers do you want?
      • Depending upon how you are using Twitter, you may want to have a “small” or “large following.”
      • Watch your ratio. If only a few people follow you, but you follow a thousand or more, many people will assume you’re a spammer
    • To get followed:
      • Follow people who are relevant to you. They often follow you back.
      • Retweet and @mention people who are relevant to you. They often follow you in return.
      • Tweet often. People are more likely to follow you if you are active.
      • Add valuable information & urls.
      • Use the hashtag #followfriday and recommend people on Friday.
      • Don’t spam. People will unfollow you very quickly.
  • Twitter Tips and Etiquette
    • Err on the side of transparency and disclosure. Always disclose affiliation when promoting products or events associated with your employer. If you use Twitter in a professional setting, include information about your affiliation in your bio.
    • Don’t tweet rapid fire. Unless you’re participating to a real-time discussion, twittering 30-plus times an hour pushes other people’s Tweets off of the main page, and sends mobiles into convulsive twit-fits..
    • Don’t forget about DM. Keep those small conversations private. If you’re deciding what movie to see with your significant one no one else needs to receive those updates. Hitting @ becomes reflexive after a while, but DMs are a better option in these scenarios.
    • Be vague when twittering private events. Be mindful of other people’s privacy expectations. Your meeting ’s host may not want her sensitive extended circle to know about the meeting you are having.
  • Twitter Tips and Etiquette (Continued)
    • Remember, everyone can hear you. This may seem obvious, but Twitter is a public medium, just like a blog. People you know may be listening to your every word. Don’t do anything that could get you fired, be used against you in court, or result in loss of friendship.
    • What’s rude in life is rude on Twitter. Passive-aggressive tweets are never as inscrutable as the sender thinks. When you’re being mean, even covertly, eventually everyone figures out the target. And then they start firing the arrows back your way.
    • Don’t compound an accident. If you accidentally twitter a message that was intended to be a direct text, there’s no need to send a follow-up apology if the mistake is obvious. Delete.
    • Try to keep within the character limit. Twitter is best suited to messages that stay within its 140-character limit. Otherwise, users have to scroll back and track your name through multiple posts. That’s not such a big deal if you do it occasionally, but it can become galling if you make it a habit.
  • Twitter Tips and Etiquette (Continued)
    • Plug / promote moderately. If you are only using Twitter to plug your blog posts, events, or products, you will loose followers. Mix in some conversation and discuss topics of interest with others.
    • Respond quickly. People expect a response in hours, not days or weeks.
    • Represent yourself honestly. Never impersonate someone else. Represent yourself as an IBMer if tweeting about IBM topics.
    • Be professional.
      • Be nice. Avoid negative comments and words.
      • Write as well as 140 characters allows.
      • Do not engage in battles.
      • Do not bash competitors.
    • Never spam.
      • If you want to resend a message, change a few words!
  • Research shows followers like urls in tweets
    • By adding links to tweets you can direct users to useful information (such as a specific page on ibm.com).
    • Research shows that the number of links provided is one of the most important parameters in achieving many followers.
    • The recommendation is to have a link in at least 3 out every 20 tweets.
    • Note: use a url shortener!
      • Best: Bit.ly (Tweetdeck incorporates Bit.ly).
      • Bit.ly has metrics capability.
  • Learn and apply your company’s social media guidelines and value statements
    • Represent your company’s values regardless of the medium.
    • Read and apply your company’s social media guidelines: http://www.ibm.com/blogs/zz/en/guidelines.html Extract: Know the IBM Business Conduct Guidelines. Be who you are. Be thoughtful about how you present yourself. Speak in the first person. Respect copyright and fair use laws. Protect confidential and proprietary information . Don't comment on confidential IBM financial information . Protect IBM’s clients, business partners and suppliers. Respect your audience and your coworkers. Add value. Don’t pick fights. Be the first to respond to your own mistakes. Use your best judgment. Don't forget your day job .
  • DOs and DON’Ts
    • Do use @ if you want to direct a Tweet at someone
    • Do use Direct Message (DM) if you want to send a private message
    • Do retweet (RT) when you find something interesting
    • Do use # for group tweets or discussion topics
    • Do use bit.ly to shorten URLs
    • Do share stories and links
    • Do let people know about your day
    • Do comment on other tweets
    • Do follow people you find interesting
    • Do be honest and be yourself
    • Do not use Twitter to spam
    • Do not tweet something you will regret; think before you hit “update”
    • Do not use Twitter solely to promote your blog/company- your tweets should add value to the conversation
    • Do not monopolize the conversation by tweeting too many times within seconds
    • Do not ask people why they unfollowed you
    • Do not ask your followers to Digg, Stumble, or social bookmark your blog post
    • Do not brag about how many people follow you but only follow a few
  • Being findable in Twitter & search engines
    • Use key words
      • Learn what key words would be used by your audience.
      • Don’t abbreviate your key words.
      • Place key words in the beginning (at least in the first 27 characters of the tweet).
    • Tweet often
      • Tweet often to keep your messages fresh, visible and findable.
      • Popular topics’ visible search results (same screen) are hours or minutes old.
      • Search.twitter.com will only return posts from the last seven days.
      • The right column twitter search on the home page will return posts from the last 20 days.
    • Hashtags can help
      • Hashtagged posts are indexed and held at hashtag.org for 6 months.
    • Register
      • Register on twello.com, twibes.com, wefollow.com, tweepz,com
  • Tips cheat sheet
    • Want to drive SEO? Search engines use the first 27 characters of your tweet (as these are become the <TITLE> on your Twitter static pages): Put the keywords in the beginning.
    • Need a dashboard view? Use Tweetdeck to see and update both Twitter, Facebook and MySpace, create groups, shorten urls, search and even manage multiple accounts.
    • No time to tweet? Use Hootsuite to schedule tweets.
    • Need short urls? Use Bit.ly (which is a Tweetdeck feature).
    • Want to manage multiple accounts? Use hootsuite or cotweet.
    • Want to search faster? Twitter recently added a search function to the right panel of your homepage.
    • When editing retweets, give credit to the original poster . Add the following reference in the post: RT @”username (RT @mariaruotoloibm)
    • To be retweeted, don’t use all 140 characters. This allows for easier retweeting and commenting.
  • Some articles on Twitter related tools for you to check out
    • Top Ten Essential Twitter Tools to Streamline Socializing on the Web
    • Top 55 Twitter tools to use in 2010
    • 20 Top Monitoring and Analytics Twitter Tools
  • TweetDeck is a browser application that can monitor multiple Twitter searches in realtime, while allowing you to post messages.
    • It helps you stay in touch with what’s happening on Twitter.
    • It makes it easy to categorize contacts and interact with Twitter.
    • You can maintain contacts across Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and MySpace.
    • See: tweetdeck.com
  • HootSuite helps you manage multiple Twitter and other social media profiles or blogs.
    • Have multiple editors contributing to one presence
    • Pre-schedule tweets
    • Measure your success.
    • See: hootsuite.com
  • You can schedule tweets to post at times you are not available to do the post yourself
    • Frequency. The expectation is to tweet and respond to tweets several times a day. Research finds that people expect a reply within 4 hours and if people don’t see your message within 5 minutes they may not see it at all.
    • Change it up. Reps need to tweet about various subjects. People network with people who they can relate to!
    • Automate. Time your tweets by using tools like Hootsuite.com
    • Repost. Tweet important messages at least a couple of times, at different hours and over the course of several days. Take the time to change the words in your message so as not to appear robotic.
    • Tweet at the best times.
      • Researchers have found that most tweets and retweets are seen and sent on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays and during early business hours.
      • For best clickthrough: Dan Zarella’s blog says to tweet later in the afternoon and on weekends.
    • Source: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/4439/State-of-the-Twittersphere-Q4-2008-report.aspx
  • Sync Twitter and LinkedIn Status Updates
    • Users of Twitter and LinkedIn can sync their status updates. Tweet from Twitter and it updates your LinkedIn (and vice versa).
    • From the LinkedIn side :
      • The Twitter Settings panel allows you to link your accounts and choose whether your Twitter account appears on your profile.
      • There is a box that you can check to tell LinkedIn whether you want to tweet out specific status updates.
    • From the Twitter side :
      • In your LinkedIn settings, you can link your LinkedIn account to your Twitter account and then choose whether you want to share all of your tweets on LinkedIn OR just specific ones by using the hashtags: #in.
  • Selective Tweets is a Facebook app that lets you update your Facebook status via your Tweet on Twitter You can choose which tweets you want. Just end a tweet with #fb when you want to post it as your Facebook status. http://www.facebook.com/selectivetwitter#!/selectivetwitter?v=info
    • What is it? It’s a new IBM Adobe Air microblogging client for both Lotus Connections and Twitter.
      • The application is packed with features to help you stay connected with people inside and outside your organization.
      • Like Bluto you can use Glue to integrate with other external sites like Facebook and LinkedIn by utilizing their current integration mechanisms – the #fb and #in.
      • Download it at http://connectionsglue.com/ (free for IBMers)
    Tools like Glue can manage internal and external social status messages (Lotus Connections, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn)
  • Suggested next steps
    • Read your company’s Social Computing Guidelines
    • Check out Twitter’s FAQs: http://help.twitter.com/forums/10711/entries/13920
    • Twitter’s guide for business users Twitter for business - Twitter 101 for Businesses
    • Get started!