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Communities 101   2-planning and launching communities 16 nov2010
 

Communities 101 2-planning and launching communities 16 nov2010

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This is the second deck in a series of Community 101 decks designed to help those tasked with planning, launching, growing and sustaining online communities.

This is the second deck in a series of Community 101 decks designed to help those tasked with planning, launching, growing and sustaining online communities.

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  • Communities can be supported by dedicated professionals fulfilling certain functions. There are many roles that people can be given time to fill (such as information broker, facilitator, administrator, leader, core group members, subject matter expert - to name a few)10. Without this support communities are subject to the momentary whims of the members, relying on the members’ discretionary willingness to perform such functions. If the community does not have people who are willing or able to perform these roles, service organizations can be contracted to provide it. These groups can put staff in place to perform these functions during key community events, or they might play a consulting role with the community to locate members who are willing to fulfill these responsibilities. Often the members of the core group within the community are the ones who ensure that this support is in place. Although CoP membership is voluntary and CoPs function based on community input, there are several leadership responsibilities necessary for a CoP to be successful. Two primary roles should be filled at the initial kickoff of a community: the Community Leader and the Community Sponsor. The Community Leader guides the community and helps keep the focus on the goals, while the Community Sponsor serves as the group’s champion, internally and externally. Other responsibilities, listed below, are also important to a CoP’s success. • Knowledge Management — managing the CoP’s repository of information, ensuring all members have access to information created or referenced by the community. • Meeting Facilitation — ensuring meetings stay on track, that each member has an opportunity to speak, and that the group is working towards meeting the goals of the community. • Relationship Management — building relationships between the CoP’s members to strengthen the group’s membership. • Subject Matter Expertise — conducting research and providing expertise to ensure the group doesn’t get stalled or stray from its focus and that the community continues to seek out new and innovative solutions. • Technology Management — selecting, managing, and maintaining the right technology to ensure members, regardless of geographical location, have the opportunity to interact, participate, and benefit from the community. These responsibilities do not have to be managed by single individuals. One or more members may be accountable for multiple responsibilities, which is likely in the early stages of community development. Exec Sponsor Serves as the group’s champion, internally and externally. Is able to envision the value of the community over time to both the members as well as the organization. Community Leader Plays the most critical role in the community's success by energizing the sharing process and providing continuous nourishment for the community. Communicates a sense of passion and guides the community towards its goals through consulting, connecting, facilitating, helping, guiding Community Council Advises community leader in launching and sustaining the community. Frequently takes on additional roles as listed below. Community Members Without these there is no community; the essence of a community is its members. Contributes and extracts value via content, programs, and social/professional network
  • Communities can be supported by dedicated professionals fulfilling certain functions. There are many roles that people can be given time to fill (such as information broker, facilitator, administrator, leader, core group members, subject matter expert - to name a few)10. Without this support communities are subject to the momentary whims of the members, relying on the members’ discretionary willingness to perform such functions. If the community does not have people who are willing or able to perform these roles, service organizations can be contracted to provide it. These groups can put staff in place to perform these functions during key community events, or they might play a consulting role with the community to locate members who are willing to fulfill these responsibilities. Often the members of the core group within the community are the ones who ensure that this support is in place. Although CoP membership is voluntary and CoPs function based on community input, there are several leadership responsibilities necessary for a CoP to be successful. Two primary roles should be filled at the initial kickoff of a community: the Community Leader and the Community Sponsor. The Community Leader guides the community and helps keep the focus on the goals, while the Community Sponsor serves as the group’s champion, internally and externally. Other responsibilities, listed below, are also important to a CoP’s success. • Knowledge Management — managing the CoP’s repository of information, ensuring all members have access to information created or referenced by the community. • Meeting Facilitation — ensuring meetings stay on track, that each member has an opportunity to speak, and that the group is working towards meeting the goals of the community. • Relationship Management — building relationships between the CoP’s members to strengthen the group’s membership. • Subject Matter Expertise — conducting research and providing expertise to ensure the group doesn’t get stalled or stray from its focus and that the community continues to seek out new and innovative solutions. • Technology Management — selecting, managing, and maintaining the right technology to ensure members, regardless of geographical location, have the opportunity to interact, participate, and benefit from the community. These responsibilities do not have to be managed by single individuals. One or more members may be accountable for multiple responsibilities, which is likely in the early stages of community development. Knowledge Management  — managing the CoP’s repository of information, ensuring all members have access to information created or referenced by the community. Meeting Facilitation  — ensuring meetings stay on track, that each member has an opportunity to speak, and that the group is working towards meeting the goals of the community. Relationship Management  — building relationships between the CoP’s members to strengthen the group’s membership. Subject Matter Expertise  — conducting research and providing expertise to ensure the group doesn’t get stalled or stray from its focus and that the community continues to seek out new and innovative solutions. Technology Management  — selecting, managing, and maintaining the right technology to ensure members, regardless of geographical location, have the opportunity to interact, participate, and benefit from the community.

Communities 101   2-planning and launching communities 16 nov2010 Communities 101 2-planning and launching communities 16 nov2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Communities 101 – Planning and Launching Communities #2 in a series of community enablement deliverables Version 4-0 Contact: Bill Chamberlin, Principle Consultant, Market Insights
  • About This Community Enablement Series
    • This series was developed by the Market Insights Social Insights Practice team to assist community managers in launching and sustaining successful online communities.
    • Deliverables in the Community 101 Series
      • Introduction to Communities
      • Planning and Launching Communities
      • Growing and Sustaining Communities
      • Monitoring the Health of Communities
      • Ten Tips for Leaders Using Connections
      • How YOU Can Leverage Communities
    • Community Are Powerful Tools, As Long As You Put Members’ Needs First.
    • - Forrester, 2008
  • Planning and Launching Communities
  • Four critical elements in developing a successful community
    • It’s not all about the social networking technology platform
    • Capabilities
    • Create a content repository
    • Connect members to content
    • Identify most valued content
    • Methodologies
    • Community templates
    • Community education offerings
    • Daily/weekly community leadership activities
    • Relationships
    • Easy for members to form new relationships
    • Linkages with other communities
    • People
    • Community Leader is passionate
    • Exec Sponsor is committed and models collaborative behavior
    • Members share a common interest
    • Management System
    • Secure resources & funding
    • Form a Community Council & establish a Community Charter
    • Establish cadence of meetings
    • Manage to a balanced scorecard
    • Create sense & respond capability
    People Technology Process Knowledge
    • Technology
    • Rich Member profiles
    • Simple to use social collaboration platform
    • Community Leader Tools
    • Platform measures value, participation, and reputation of membership
  • Before you start, make sure you are launching the community that has a chance to be successful. Developing a launch plan for a community is similar to developing a launch plan for a new product or service ….or even a new company
    • Should You Even Launch A Community?
    • Is there a sense of energy and passion around the community topic or domain?
    • Is there a recognized need that the community can meet, thus providing value to the members and their organizations?
    • Is management aware of the potential value, utility, and benefits to members? To the organization?
    • Is there top-level sponsorship?
    • Can potential members be identified?
    • Is there an existing sense of community among potential members?
    • Is there a significant or critical issue facing the potential community membership that knowledge sharing can positively impact?
    • Are there resources (i.e., money, people, technology) to support the community?
    • Best Practices
    • Leader Is Passionate and Very Active
    • Establish Clear Goals and Purpose
    • Needs of Members Comes First
    • SME Talent Assigned to Council
    • Management Has Committed Time, Resources, and Funding
    • Make it Social & Communal
    • Worst Practices
    • Starting With Technology
    • As Part of a Marketing “Campaign”
    • Focus on Value to Organization Only
    • Mixing Business / Consumer Motives
    • Wrong Focus: Metrics vs. Business Measures
  • Use an Implementation Checklist when planning to launch a community Sample Community Launch Implementation Checklist Who? Activity Description When? Document why the community is needed What are the main issues and why will a community help solve those issues? Create a business case What are the potential benefits to individuals, to the organization? Where will value be created? What will be the necessary investment in resources (people, process, technology, and knlwledge management capabilities) Identify an initial community leader The community leader is a critical decision. The leader must be passionate about the community domain and the potential value of the community. Community leaders should be assigned full time during the planning and launch phases. Define the scope of the community Where will the community focus its efforts? What organizations? What will be the demographics of the membership? Recruit a core team of community council members The council members should be selected to represent various segments within the demographics of the community. World class communities have a very active and involved community council. Assign roles The community leader can’t do it all alone, Volunteers should assist with the various community roles. Document core community activities and processes What will be the regular events? What will be a typical agenda for those events? How will the community make progress in between events? What are the processes and activities needed to grow the membership? Who wil do those activities? Develop a Knowledge Management Plan What types of deliverable content will the community share and collaborate on? Will there be community calendars, profiles, forums, etc? Develop a Technology Platform plan What collaboration and networking tools will the community have access to? How will training be conducted? What are the future technology requirements for the community. Document the Community Charter The charter will be a document that provides a description of the community mission and the major elements (people, process, technology, and knowledge). Inventory and post existing content First impressions are important. There should be some existing content that provides immediate value to members signing up for the community. Document a 90 day Launch Plan The 90 day Launch Plan provides a list of tasks to be completed from the actual launch day through the first 90 days of the community to ensure a successful start of the community. Hold Pre-Launch Review Meeting The sponsor, community leader, and the community council should meet to review and approve the community charter, the PPTK elements (People, Process, Technology, and Knowledge) and the 90 day Launch Plan. Launch the Community Implement the 90day Launch Plan
  • A Community Charter Template should be documented prior to launch
    • Name: (The name of the Community, i.e., Developer Community, Customer User Group)
    • Target Member Demographics: (List the characteristics of the members that the community is hoping to attract)
    • Purpose/Intent: (What is the purpose/intent of the community?, i.e., Skill Building, Listening.)
    • Domain: (What is/are the topic(s) of interest that best supports the community ’ s purpose)
    • Assigned Roles: (Identify by name the individuals who are filling roles.)
    • Sponsor:
    • Leader:
    • Council Members:
    • Critical Business Issues: ( Identify the critical business issues faced by the community.)
    • Collaboration Platform (List the primary collaboration tools/platform that will be used.)
    • Resources Required: (Identify the resources required to support the community, i.e., existing resources that are available, required contractor support, and content that needs to be developed.)
    • Measures of Success: (List measures of success.)
    The community charter includes an articulation of the mission, vision, goals, and member norms and agreements. Sample Community Charter
  • Different people and processes are required to launch and sustain vibrant communities The Community Leader is the most critical person. They typically takes on most if not all of the additional community responsibilities. Primary Community Roles Role Description Exec Sponsor Serves as the group’s champion, internally and externally. Is able to envision the value of the community over time to both the members as well as the organization. Community Leader Plays the most critical role in the community's success by energizing the sharing process and providing continuous nourishment for the community. Communicates a sense of passion and guides the community towards its goals through consulting, connecting, facilitating, helping, guiding Community Council Advises community leader in launching and sustaining the community. Frequently takes on additional roles as listed below. Community Members Without these there is no community; the essence of a community is its members. Contributes and extracts value via content, programs, and social/professional network
  • Different people and processes are required to launch and sustain vibrant communities The Community Leader is the most critical person. They typically takes on most if not all of the additional community responsibilities. Additional Activities Required For A Successful Community Role Description of Activities Social Media Manager Manages the communities presence in the social media Meeting Facilitation Schedules and facilitates meetings. Ensures meetings stay focused on goals of the community. Subject Matter Expertise Shares knowledge and experience. Ensures the community continues to seek out new and innovative solutions and methods. Relationship Management Builds relationships between the members to strengthen the overall community. Knowledge Management Organizes the community knowledge. Ensures all members have access to content created or referenced by the community. Analysis Analyzes the community content and membership network to identify and extract value. Technology Management Ensures that the community platform and tools supports the goals and objectives of the community.
  • The Community Leader is a Member Champion
    • Interacts with members
    • Leads community:
      • Member advocate
      • Community evangelist
      • Creates editorial content
      • Harvests market insights
      • Balances the needs of the community with organizational objectives
    • Skills required:
      • Strong online communication skills
      • Approachable and conversational
      • Has the ability to relate to members online and offline
      • Comfortable with Web 2.0 and social media tools
    • Key Activities
    • Promotes community
    • Encourages participation & discussion
    • Connects members with each other
    • Produces deliverables
    • Reports community metrics
    • Monitors & responds
    • Communicates news
    • Organizes events
    • Surveys for needs
  • Forrester has identified four tenets of the Community Manager Forrester: “Online Community Best Practices” by Jeremiah Owyang, Feb, 2008 Description of Core Activities Community Advocate The community manager’s primary role is to represent the members of the community. They must listen, monitor, and respond to requests and conversations, both within the community platform and in email. Brand Evangelist Community manager promotes events, products, and upgrades using traditional marketing tactics as well as being part of conversations within the community. The community manager must first earn and maintain trust. Facilitator Defines, plans, and executes content strategy. Uses forums, blogs, podcasts, and other tools to create content. Mediates disputes: Encourages advocates and deals with — or when necessary removes — detractors. Works with corporate stakeholders to identify content, plan updates, publish, and follow-up. Research and Development Contributor Gathers the requirements of the community and presents to product teams. Plans and analyzes results of surveys or focus groups. Facilitates relationships between product teams and customers.
  • Community platform tools can help members, collaborate, connect and build the community’s knowledgebase
    • Member profiles are critical for allowing members to connect to other individuals. Profiles help members find people they need, based on their expertise, shared content, projects, current responsibilities, and reputation.
    • Forums provide for discussions, ad hoc Q&A, and threaded conversation on topics of interest.
    • Blogs allow for members to present ideas / perspectives to the community members who can then comment and provide ratings for those blog entries.
    • News articles provide a means to keep membership current. These can be automated feeds or manual news articles authored by the community leader(s).
    • Wikis can allow community to create reference material. Members should be able to create wiki spaces, view changes across pages, and provide ratings and comments.
    • Content Sharing: Upload and share any type of content to share with community members. Tool should allow for version control and viewing downloads, comments and ratings.
    • Messaging or chat capability can allow for one-on-one conversation, etc.
    • Search Engine allow for searches across the entire community platform for content or experts
    • Member Homepage. Members should be able to customize and manage their homepage, viewing relevant social data aggregated across subscriptions, notifications and network of colleagues.
  • Understand what advanced community technology platform functions are available Description of Function Collaboration Tools
    • Menu approach, including Blogs, Wikis, Forums, News Feeds, File Sharing, Q&A, Chats, Messaging, Web Meetings, Polls/Surveys. All with tagging, rating and ranking capability.
    • Easy to collaborate anytime, anywhere, on any topic.
    Social Networks
    • Easy to search for expertise in social networks
    • Present what’s important to the individual member and filter out the rest of the noise
    • Provides ability to map the networks within the community
    Member Profiles
    • Rich profiles promote social interaction and adoption
    • Ease of updating personal status and ability to notify network is critical
    • Profiles allow members to choose what topics/members they are interested in following
    • Capability to embed feeds from other tools and social media into profiles (examples, Linkedin, Facebook, Twitter, etc)
    • Search engine makes finding experts and information on topics easier
    Virtual / Remote Interaction
    • Tools such as webcam, videos and virtual worlds can enable live virtual events/meetings, and promote social interaction
    • Mobile access can empower customer-facing employees
    Community Management
    • Provides advanced capabilities to launch, grow, and sustain the community, including insights dashboard, balanced scorecard, metrics, membership demographics and network analysis.
    External Linkages
    • Embedded feeds from external communities and social networking tools provide information on topics and subject matter experts
  • Prior to launch, the Community Leader and Sponsor should agree on the budget
    • One-time costs
      • Labor
      • Launch Team
      • Other costs
      • Consulting startup fees
      • Community technology platform
      • Media creation for launch
      • Content creation for launch
    • Ongoing Monthly Costs
    • Labor
    • Community Leader
    • Community Council
    • IT Support & Administration
    • Subject Matter Experts
    • Marketing Personnel (for external communities)
    • Resources
    • Event costs (e.g. conference calls/webinars/meetings)
    • Content creation
    • Media creation (optional)
    • Advertising (optional)
    • Consulting services (as needed to sustain/grow community)
    • Outsourced services, including maintenance, monitoring, reporting, and alerting
  • Each stage has different requirements for success There are five stages in the lifecycle of a community Shape and rate of incline curve depends on successful execution of combination of People, Process, Technology and Knowledge Plan / Design Launch Create Value Sustain Harvest / Reengineer People
    • Secure committed sponsor and a passionate leader
    • Establish a community council
    • Attend “Community 101”
    • Invite Members
    • Sell / Market community
    • Establish community reputation
    • Sponsor models behavior
    • Leader creates energy and passion for the community
    • Subject Matter Experts submit content
    • Strengthen linkages with other communities
    • Identify and reward most active members
    • Rotate council members
    • Plan for next stage in evolution.
    • Secure new sponsor and / or community leader
    Process
    • Create a community charter
    • Survey to understand un-served member needs
    • Secure appropriate resources
    • Establish event processes
    • Hold kickoff meeting
    • Conduct platform training
    • Establish feedback mechanism
    • Establish regular cadence of meetings / calls
    • Tag / Bookmark content
    • Push content links to community members
    • Promote collaboration
    • Advertise best of breed examples
    • Survey yearly to understand community value / requirements
    • Measure success against Community Maturity Model
    • Review community charter
    • Research community best practices
    • Innovate/transform
    • Re-launch community.
    Technology
    • Document short-term and long-term platform requirements
    • Establish an online Platform
    • Import Profiles
    • Forums or Blogs are good community collaboration starters
    • Promote basic collaborative tools (file sharing, wikis, blogs, forums, etc).
    • Capture participation and reputation metrics
    • Experiment with advanced collaboration and network analysis tools
    • Improve platform based on community surveys.
    • Document new requirements for technology
    Knowledge
    • Gather and inventory existing content
    • Post and tag existing content
    • Point members to existing content and forums
    • Capture best of breed practices and content
    • Identify and tag highest valued content and members
    • Identify, tag and recommend highest valued content and members
    • Extract value from knowledgebase and social tools
    Business Value Time to Value