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Finding and Keeping the      Right Staff
The tiers of job postingsOld Way: Put asign in yourwindowNew Way: post onyour webpageKey: Are you anemployer of choiceor a...
The tiers of job postingsOld Way: put anad in thenewspaperNew Way:advertise on jobposting sitesKey: Find the rightfit for ...
Online Advertising SourcesNational SitesLocal SitesSites targetedtowards certainindustries orprofessionsCollege CareerCent...
The tiers of job postingsWay 1: Staffing agencyWay 2: HeadhunterKey to 1: Do you need togive people a trial run?Key to 2: ...
Go Find them!Old Way: Networkin personNew Way: Networkthrough professionalsocial media.Key: Recruiting thepassive job seek...
QuickTime™ and a      H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
Patient recruiting
Analyze and know what works for             you!
Selection
Skill vs. Will
Assessing Skill
Assessing Will
QuickTime™ and a      H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
Accountant?              To work asAccountant    an assistant             to a High D?
Retention- How to keep a Rock Star and make sure they stay            One
1. Define SuccessWhat tune needs to be sung?
Define Success  The Performance    Evaluation
2. Coach SuccessGive them voice lessons.
Coach Success                            The Performance                            Development PlanUse the following scal...
Coach Success              The Performance              Development Plan          Discuss Questions Such As:1. What profes...
Keys to Coaching feedback
Keys to Coaching feedback      SpecificBehavioral Based
Keys to Coaching feedback
Keys to Coaching feedback
Keys to Coaching feedback
3. Recognize & Reward Success Tell people they are rock stars
Keys to RecognitionKNOW YOUR PEOPLE!!!TimelySpecificSincerePersonalProportional
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Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
Finding and keeping the right staff
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Finding and keeping the right staff

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Tips and advice for recruiting and retaining good people

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  • So important because people are your greatest asset- company value is focused on this How do you maximize that greatest asset? You recruit, select and retain the right people- just don’t want want medicore people... gives you a competitive advantage -tell them to ask questions as they arise- casual
  • music to illustrate? Whole point of recruitment and selection and retention is to find “rock stars” that help you make money- grow your business What is a rock star? -Makes a name for themselves in what they are good at- they’ve found their tune and they sing it -Someone who produces results for your company -Plays well with others, co-exists with people in productive ways -has a level of loyalty
  • Recruitment Picture of help wanted sign How do you recruit? Where do you advertise?
  • A hierarchy in terms of effectiveness, cost generally increases as you step up the ladder. KEY TO IT ALL- KNOW WHO YOU ARE TARGETING AND WHAT METHOD WILL REACH THEM, will show a tool to do this a little bit later in the presentation 1. Help wanted ad 1. Put a help wanted ad up in your window.... -in the age of digital/virtual media, thats like posting it on your web page -attitude of you come to us -if you are an employer of choice you can probably do this, at least for positions where there is a good supply of labor -cost- virtually nothing -for entry level positions- walking in the front door and asking for a job leads to jobs for 47 out of 100 people 2. Advertise the opening -old days, put it in print newspaper. We now know the newspaper business is declining, but may still be the way to go if you are looking for unskilled labor -age of virtual- post on a job posting site- so many different ones now find the fit for you- do you need to post something just to the local market, a more national recruiting market
  • KEY TO IT ALL- KNOW WHO YOU ARE TARGETING AND WHAT METHOD WILL REACH THEM So in the old days you: 1. Put a help wanted ad up in your window.... -in the age of digital/virtual media, thats like posting it on your web page -attitude of you come to us -if you are an employer of choice you can probably do this, at least for positions where there is a good supply of labor -cost- virtually nothing -for entry level positions- walking in the front door and asking for a job leads to jobs for 47 out of 100 people
  • Ad at DSW recently- helped wanted sign in their door- does this work for them? good in a retail or resturant setting where traffic is frequent- targeting their customers for employees
  • 2. Advertise the opening -old days, put it in print newspaper. We now know the newspaper business is declining, but may still be the way to go if you are looking for unskilled labor -age of virtual- post on a job posting site- so many different ones now find the fit for you- do you need to post something just to the local market, a more national recruiting market
  • 2. Advertise the opening -old days, put it in print newspaper. We now know the newspaper business is declining, but may still be the way to go if you are looking for unskilled labor -age of virtual- post on a job posting site- so many different ones now find the fit for you- do you need to post something just to the local market, a more national recruiting market
  • Discuss where each one may or may not be a fit for your opening national sites- can be expensive, but generate a lot of traffic. Do you need to recruit from a national market? -for job seekers, looking at these sites and applying leads to jobs for 8 out of 100- low odds, low odds translate to you too- or you have to sort through a lot to get a good apple Looking for talent locally? local newspaper or chamber site may be beneficial, alabama job link w/ the career center- search resumes create a posting for free -range in price (some free) -mention posting on careerpathway.info page and facebook page Looking for a specific skill set? Check with your professional organization you belong to- example- SIOP for people in I/O Psychology -leads to jobs for 7 out of 100 people -College Career Centers for entry level or intern talent for job seekers, responding to these
  • A hierarchy in terms of effectiveness, cost generally increase as you step up the ladder. KEY TO IT ALL- KNOW WHO YOU ARE TARGETING AND WHAT METHOD WILL REACH THEM 3. Hire a headhunter or a staffing agency to do the work for you.
  • By far the most expensive method. Most staffing agencies charge a rate based on they hourly rate, headhunters typically charge a percentage of the positions salary. -staffing agencies/headhunters- lead to jobs for 4 to 22 out of 100 job seekers, still pretty low odds and very expensive, but you get expertise and saved time which may be extremely valuable to you
  • Describe story where someone drove by Sage and Bailey’s house and knocked on the door to ask if their boat was for sale. Bailey politely told them it wasn’t, and Sage came home and said that as far as he was concerned, everything they had was for sale for the right price (maybe less their child :) Well, everyone, even those currently employed are for hire.
  • Well, everyone, even those currently employed are for hire. Example of Kristy at Krystal, friendliest drive through person they had ever met. The clinic needed a receptionist that was friendly and customer service oriented, and they pulled through the drive thru one day and asked her if she was interested in the job! Always be on the lookout for the rockstars, in the drive thru line, at church, in a meeting with a client or a customer, seek them out and find them. Ask colleagues if they know a rock start they would recommend if you have an opening. You can get the best. The pre-requisite is that you have to be out there meeting people- We tell private job seeking clients that networking is the most proven way to find a job- well it would make sense then that is is the best way to find people too! Well first of all, you have to know they are a rock star, and the selection methods I’m going to talk about next don’t necessarily guarantee a 100% hit that they are if you don’t know them beforehand. People tend to be on their best behavior when interviewing, etc.
  • In terms of cost, this often less expensive than all the others
  • -”old” way- network -asking friends for job leads leads to jobs for 34 out 100 seekers -asking family leads to jobs for 27 out of 100 seekers -virtual way- network virtually through LinkedIn
  • In the virtual world, we call these people “the passive job seeker” and LinkedIn is one great way to seek them out. Pull up linkedin- search for “recruiter” search for people, companies, by skill, etc Search for people who have the skills and expertise you need, glowing recommendations, look at resumes and contact them about openings you have.- basic account will only show people who you are connected to -join groups relevant to your industry to connect to more people Click on Upgrade screen- will show you what you can pay for to find people (hiring a headhunter, may do this as one of their strategies) Click on profile views on profile page- May even want to check out who has looked you up- that may be a lead There are exceptions to this rule, but generally, those that are currently employed, and happily currently employed, may be the best of the rock stars
  • Grow your own- Outside of the stair steps, because you are going to have to use the steps to find someone in the first place, but may be the best place to grow someone into a rock star employers responsibility in the skills gap: Connect to what I’m going to talk about in retention- coaching, developing and training people for success Unemployment Is Up. Why Is It So Hard to Find the Right Hires? Wharton professor Peter Cappelli argues in a new book that companies need to recruit talented people, and train them--the way they used to. When describing the skills shortages plaguing their companies, CEOs sound like the Ancient Mariner: Water, water everywhere, nor any drop to drink! Even with the unemployment rate at 8.2%, business leaders complain there aren't enough people qualified to fill "today's jobs," shorthand for positionsthat require expertise in specific technologies or pretty much anything in health care. Usually, America's schools are the fall guys. Primary education, we are told, does a lousy job imparting the fundamentals of math and science. Colleges graduate too many liberal arts majors, when they graduate people at all.  Peter Cappelli is having none of it. In Why Good People Can't Get Jobs: The Skills Gap and What Companies Can Do About It , which was released today by Wharton Digital Press, the University of Pennsylvania management professor argues that employers are largely to blame for their hiring troubles. Their sins include larding job descriptions with an impossible number of requirements, including many that only people who have already done that exact job can meet. They also rely too much on software to screen thousands of applications, which dooms promising candidates whose resumes lack the precise words that alert such programs. Cappelli thinks companies should switch from "buy" to "build" orientations: instead of shopping for perfect-out-of-the-box outsiders, they should expand training programs and offer apprenticeships. Inc. editor-at-large Leigh Buchanan spoke with Cappelli about getting the right people into the right seats.   First off, I want to commiserate with your son, who studied classics and had trouble finding a job after college. My son graduated two weeks ago. History major. We are not optimistic. Sometimes the temp world is out there for these guys, even though I haven't quite encouraged my son to do that yet. He's had a couple of jobs but they were like warehouse employee. Then he went back to school and got a phlebotomy certification to work in health care. Since then he's been looking for health-care jobs but couldn't get those either. I was in China in February and they have the same problem: that college graduates aren't doing very well, particularly when compared to factory workers. The Chinese really did take education seriously. They are very shaken up by this. While working on the book, did you talk to any job seekers who felt the school system had failed them? No. And when you follow up on the surveys of hiring managers asking about their concerns, they pretty much never talk about deficiencies in academic skills. When they rank the issues they say are important, academic skills are way, way down near the bottom. What they do complain about is work experience. They want someone who has done this exact job before and doesn't need training. The question is: is that a legitimate complaint? Because kids like yours and mine haven't had three years doing phlebotomy or sales or coding. It doesn't indicate there's something wrong with the applicants. It indicates something has changed on the employers' side. What they are expecting now is completely unrealistic. Why have employers' expectations become so inflated? Is it because the pool of job seekers has grown enormous?   Part of it is that they can afford to get picky in a downturn. Part is that they believe they should be able to find these perfect people. It's irrational. They are leaving vacancies unfilled for months and months while they hunt for somebody who could come in tomorrow and do the job. They are passing by people who would take a few days of training to get up to speed. They don't know what it costs to keep these positions vacant or how little it would cost to give people a few days of ramp-up.  Recommended Videos What a Serial Entrepreneur Can't Resist Eboo Patel: How to Build an Inspiration al Business Meet the Husband-Wife Team Behind Bab ysitter Site Sittercity The other, longer-term trend is that companies have stopped developing people internally . They've stopped hiring kids out of college and grooming them for management ranks. That means they no longer have their own training and development departments. Once you get rid of the systems for developing people, you no longer have a choice--you have to recruit outsiders. So now everyone is chasing the same people, who are doing exactly the same job that these companies have vacant. Of course it's hard to find enough of those people to go around. But that doesn't mean there's anything wrong with the labor market. I find astonishing the statistic that only 21% of US employees have received any kind of employer-provided training in five years. All I ever hear business leaders say is "hire for attitude, train for skills." Are they lying?   There's this enormous disconnect between what employers think is going on in their organizations and what is actually going on. There's also often a disconnect between what the top human-resource person thinks is going on and what goes on down the line. Companies have so gutted their human-resource departments, and everything is now automated. So a lot of people don't have a feel for what's going on. These surveys asking hiring managers about job candidates are completely at odds with what you hear from CEOs. Who is right? I would say the hiring managers. Increasingly I hear companies let departing employees compose the job descriptions used to hire their replacements. Is that helpful? When you ask an individual what is required to do your job, they tend to inflate it because it makes their work look more important, which helps their resume. It's never a good idea to ask self-interested people to provide reliable information. The better thing would be to have some expert in human resources cook these job descriptions up. That's how it used to work. They're reality testers. They ask: Do you really need a Ph.D. to do this job? Is it still a best practice to develop pipelines of talented people who can be popped into vacancies as they occur? CEOs like Kevin Ryan over at Gilt Groupe are fantastic at that.   In the '70s, every company used to do this. The single biggest block of time on the CEO's calendar was talent reviews where they assessed their people and tried to figure out what they needed next. Now people aren't even aware that their companies used to have all these development programs and job-rotation programs and things like that. Because they were hired from the outside, so they have no institutional memories. I agree that using software to evaluate employment applications is like trying to do calligraphy while wearing Mickey Mouse gloves. But if you are deluged with thousands of applications, what alternative do you have?   That's part of the conundrum. At least initially, companies were using software to make it easier for people to apply for jobs. They seemed to think that if you just got lots of applicants, it boosts their quality. So there's no way you could process all these things by hand. They have to automate some of it. The question is whether they have to take all the human judgment out of it. As we've discussed, there's a problem with the way jobs are described and what the requirements are. Hiring managers say whatever they want and it gets coded into the software. There are lots of points where you could use software to do some of the screening for you. But in an effort to get their costs down, companies have taken all the humans out of the process, and with it all the human judgment. It ends up being pound-foolish. Is there any data that compares the hiring success of large companies with that of smaller and start-up companies? Smaller businesses, I presume, are much less likely to relegate applicant evaluation to software systems. Many don't even have HR departments. My guess is smaller companies are better at [hiring] for the reasons you are describing. If you look at it on paper the smaller companies would probably complain that their costs per hire are greater than those of big companies. But it's because of the quirkiness of internal accounting where all we can see are the current costs. We can't see long-term costs or the benefits of better hires. Also, people have to be broad in those kinds of companies. You can't have these long lists of micro-requirements. Smaller companies probably are paying more attention to attitude than to credentials and experience.  In the book, you mention Rich Sheridan, CEO of Menlo Innovations. Last year I sat in on a hiring session at his company. Twice a year, Menlo brings together all 30 or so job applicants for an evening and pairs them off to work on different projects and exercises. They switch pairs three times, and the stated objective is to make your partner look good enough to get hired. In a country that lives and dies by innovation, could we better compete if more companies were like Menlo and got innovative about how they hire? You have to be innovative because clever applicants know how to game the system. One of the most effective ways to hire is with behavioral interviewing. Tell me about a time when you did blah blah. But applicants know how to answer those questions. So you've got to innovate to stay ahead of them. Some companies are very good at that. There are famous stories about Disney, which sort of misdirects applicants during group exercises, where you think you are supposed to demonstrate how smart you are but they are actually looking for something different. A generation ago companies used to be very smart about this stuff. They would spend days interviewing people. They used psychologists. Since employers seemed determined to outsource training, should we be developing new kinds of vocational schools? Or at least opening more vocational schools? Vocational education is a mess. It seems way under-funded. To the extent to which employers have a legitimate complaint around skill issues, it does relate to vocational education programs. But the schools have a legitimate complaint as well, in that the employers have to help them stay up-to-date. If you think about this as a supply-chain problem, it would be crazy for a company to say, we're getting a key component from suppliers but we're not going to talk to them. We're just expecting they are going to produce exactly what we want. That's the way most employers deal with schools. How will we wean companies off cheap or unpaid internships and get them to adapt more substantive apprenticeship programs?   I don't think we can rely on enough employers to act because they are civic-minded. In the '90s, companies participated in these kinds of programs because they thought it was right for the community. And after a while they realized it was working for them as well. We have to help businesses understand that it's cheaper to develop people from within. Appeal to their self-interest. That usually works.
  • In the virtual world, we call these people “the passive job seeker” and LinkedIn is one great way to seek them out. Pull up linkedin- search for “recruiter” search for people, companies, by skill, etc Search for people who have the skills and expertise you need, glowing recommendations, look at resumes and contact them about openings you have.- basic account will only show people who you are connected to -join groups relevant to your industry to connect to more people Click on Upgrade screen- will show you what you can pay for to find people (hiring a headhunter, may do this as one of their strategies) Click on profile views on profile page- May even want to check out who has looked you up- that may be a lead There are exceptions to this rule, but generally, those that are currently employed, and happily currently employed, may be the best of the rock stars
  • So one way or another, you’ve got a pool of applicants, or maybe a couple of rock stars you’ve discussed your job with, how do you pick the best person? First you have to know what relevant job performance is for a position; outline in a job description and indicate what is most important Design your selection based on what is relevant to job performance
  • Two things you have to select for: 1. Skill- can they do your job. If you are recruiting for a welder- can they weld; for a server, can they wait tables- take people’s orders and get them right, deliver them to a table, clean up and make correct change or run a credit card transaction. 2. Will- do they have the self-motivation, passion or desire to do your job. Do they love to weld? Do they like to greet customers with courtesy and accuracy, etc. Do they fit in with the culture also plays a role in the skill equation. Most important factor if you are growing your own talent/rock star
  • Do you take their word for it that they can weld or that they can weld because their resume says they worked as a welder, or do you test to make sure they can do the job? -Job samples -tests designed to assess skill or knowledge- workkeys, ex: blue cross had a customer service test to make sure that people could operate a mouse, follow directions on a phone and click w/ the computer at the same time, etc.
  • Focus on how this also should cater to cultural fit and co-existing in a work environment - job fit tests- example- Nucor- “Are you willing to work in temperatures that exceed 100 degrees” -Do you follow directions to the end, or do you employ short cuts to fix things?” Personality tests- talk about different ones- DISC, Hogan, Myers Briggs, etc.
  • -joke about showing videos when find funny at the EDA office- Insert one? to assess cultural fit http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDy63RfVZD4&feature=related
  • picture of an ink blot Personality tests- talk about different ones- DISC, Hogan, Myers Briggs, etc. - all not as valid as a selection instrument as they are for development or team building purposes Description of each here: advantages/disadvantages; use for certain positions? not going to be your only selection tool- but help assess culture and co-existence fit, also good for particular types of positions- ex: sales people need to be extraverts, etc.
  • picture of an ink blot Personality tests- talk about different ones- DISC, Hogan, Myers Briggs, etc. - all not as valid as a selection instrument as they are for development or team building purposes Description of each here: advantages/disadvantages; use for certain positions? DISC- D- dominance- task oriented, problem solver I-influencer- people oriented, outgoing S- steady- loyal and stable, feeling oriented, team players C- compliant- details- analytical, loves rules 1. personality fit for the job- a high C- detail oriented person is going to be a better accountatn than an outgoing people oriented i, if you are hiring an accountant and they show up as a high i, may provoke you to ask some interview questions that assess fit, asking about tolerance for errors, examples of when they’ve made errors and why, etc. 2. fit within the team or with their leader- If you are a high D who leans towards the C side - so you are results oriented and don’t really like people, is hiring an assistant who is a strong S, who is very feeling oriented going to go home crying every day b/c of your orientation? not going to be your only selection tool- but help assess culture and co-existence fit, also good for particular types of positions- ex: sales people need to be extraverts, etc.
  • ASSESSING BOTH AT ONCE 1. Behavioral based interviews- Past behavior predicts future performance ex: of questions: Will (culture): Tell me about a time that you had a conflict with a co-worker. How did you handle it. Skill and will: Tell me about a time that you had a customer complain to you in person. What was the situation and how did you address it?” More skill based: “Describe a time that you had a machine fail. How did you determine what was wrong and how did you go about fixing it?” research shows interviews should: rapport building should take place at the beginning of the interview have evaluation standards that score each item/question asked ? should reflect assessing job related behaviors ask the same questions of all applicants have the same person(s) interview all applicant source- Human Resource Selection- Gatewood, Feild, Barrick Come work for a day: 1. assesses whether they can do the job 2. assesses how they interact with the team 3. gives them a realistic job preview- what the job is, how much a day’s pay is work
  • How do you keep a rock star? 1. Let them know what tune you’re singing to- what defines success? have a job eval prepared and go over it with them on the first day. 2. Give them “voice lessons”- coach constantly- provide feedback regularly 3. Tell them they are rock stars- give praise, put in 5 things praise should be from AIDT class
  • *Make a point to mention that compensation is a factor in this. Not going to cover it for the sake of time and because it so unique to an industry, company, size community etc. but will be happy to discuss it within anyone afterwards, because it is one of the keys.
  • Everyone wants to know “What is expected of me?”
  • Keys to Retention: 1. Let them know what tune you’re singing to- what defines success? Do you need a Carrie Underwood or a 50cents? have a job eval prepared and go over it with them on the first day. Through your selection process they should already have a clear picture of this
  • So you use a performance evaluation to tell people how they are useful to you as employee. This tells them how they can be successful. Sample of one here Some tips: Give them their performance evaluation when they start- on their first day, go over it. Could be accompanied by their job description if they don’t already have a copy. -different dimensions should be “worth” different things- if everything is important nothing is- define what is MOST important on through weighting different dimensions -Review at 90 days -use for yearly review from then on -It is behavior based!
  • What you define for success should be largely within their control
  • If you’ve answered- What is expected of me? Next- everyone wants to know, “Where do I stand? and they wanted that answered through a fair and accurate perception of performance to coach success, you have to be present to see it- when is being demonstrated and when it isn’t Source: Performance Management- Putting Research into action pg. 123-124 It is behavior based You are coaching both skill and will issues communication- constant is a must; this does NOT mean mirco managing- get out of their way if they know what they are doing and do it well- communicating just means telling them they are doing it well and resassuring that you are there if needed casually coach it- right when you see it- good job formally coach it- through the job evaluation method just discussed Development plan semi annually-next slide
  • Sit down at least twice a year with some kind of development questionnaire- you both fill it out and focus on areas where answers differ- whether they think more highly of themselves than you do or vs versa, or they have different goals or areas they want to develop than you do. -Use both skill and will categories Set a course of action for addressing areas for improvement and establishing meeting commonly agreed upon goals
  • Sit down at least twice a year with some kind of development questionnaire- you both fill it out and focus on areas where answers differ- whether they think more highly of themselves than you do or vs versa, or they have different goals or areas they want to develop than you do. -Use both skill and will categories Set a course of action for addressing areas for improvement and establishing meeting commonly agreed upon goals Shows people you care about their success and development makes for sure you are on the same page with them about what you need them to do and be to develop and be successful
  • First and foremost- do it! Most of the problems are that the feedback is never given because people are afraid to 1. Give negative feedback b/c they feel it is confrontational 2. Don’t take the time to either notice positive behavior or give feedback when it happens - specific, behavioral based- not personality based. Specific: “I noticed where you have been late to work the last 3 days...”. Not, “You’ve been lazy the last three days not being at work on time...” -timely- Not a week after they come in late. -sandwich it “Joe, you’re a valued member of our team, in fact, your ability to respond to our customers with empathy and accurately is exceptional. However, I’ve noticed the last 3 days you have been more than 15 minutes late for work. That hampers not only your ability to answer customer calls on-time, but it hurts the morale of other team members who are here on time.” -allow for them to discuss and respond- 2 way dialogue- “Is there anything that has been prohibiting you from getting to work on time the last few days?” -Joe may say his wife is out of town and he is just having trouble getting himself and the kids ready on time. He voluntarily will probably say that he’ll make more of an effort to be on time, he didn’t realize it his tardiness was impacting both customers and his co-workers.” Sandwich it back- Joe, like a said you’re a key component of our customer service team, I appreciate your hard work.
  • 1. Specific 2. Behavior Based -Explain how it affects others in terms of behavior - specific, behavioral based- not personality based. Specific: “I noticed where you have been late to work the last 3 days...”. Not, “You’ve been lazy the last three days not being at work on time...” -Or- “I noticed that you and Sarah having a confrontation yesterday in the hall. You raised your voice and told her she was stupid. This isn’t acceptable here. Instead of I heard you and Sarah having a confrontation in the hall yesterday. You were moody and rude and talked to her like she was stupid.” -timely- Not a week after they come in late. -sandwich it “Joe, you’re a valued member of our team, in fact, your ability to respond to our customers with empathy and accurately is exceptional. However, I’ve noticed the last 3 days you have been more than 15 minutes late for work. That hampers not only your ability to answer customer calls on-time, but it hurts the morale of other team members who are here on time.” -allow for them to discuss and respond- 2 way dialogue- “Is there anything that has been prohibiting you from getting to work on time the last few days?” -Joe may say his wife is out of town and he is just having trouble getting himself and the kids ready on time. He voluntarily will probably say that he’ll make more of an effort to be on time, he didn’t realize it his tardiness was impacting both customers and his co-workers.” Sandwich it back- Joe, like a said you’re a key component of our customer service team, I appreciate your hard work.
  • 3. Timely So you don’t talk to Joe a week after he has come in late and the last 3 days he has been on time. You don’t talk to your person who had a confrontation with Sarah a week after the confrontation. It may have gotten better or worse, but it needs to be taken care of then. Also, you may need to talk with both of them and once in a timely matter and serve as a mediator to solve co-existing problems. Your job as the leader is to keep the conversation on track- make sure it is behavior based, not personality based and mediate issues. Don’t the meeting without a solution to the issues at hand.
  • 4. Sandwich it -sandwich it “Joe, you’re a valued member of our team, in fact, your ability to respond to our customers with empathy and accurately is exceptional. However, I’ve noticed the last 3 days you have been more than 15 minutes late for work. That hampers not only your ability to answer customer calls on-time, but it hurts the morale of other team members who are here on time.” Or- Joe I heard you and Sarah having confrontation in the hall yesterday.... describe behaviors exhibited. You are valued individual contributor here, but teamwork is an important component to success here. -allow for them to discuss and respond- 2 way dialogue- “Is there anything that has been prohibiting you from getting to work on time the last few days?” “ What has been the issue with your and Sarah’s dispute?” -Joe may say his wife is out of town and he is just having trouble getting himself and the kids ready on time. He voluntarily will probably say that he’ll make more of an effort to be on time, he didn’t realize it his tardiness was impacting both customers and his co-workers.” Joe may say Sarah is moody and defensive, here you direct him to be behavioral based, not personality based. By asking, well do you say she is moody? can you describe what she does when she is moody? Resolve it till you get to a point where you can come to agreement on what behaviors/performance is acceptable Sandwich it back- Joe, like a said you’re a key component of our customer service team, I appreciate your hard work.
  • 6. Two-way dialogue -allow for them to discuss and respond- 2 way dialogue- “Is there anything that has been prohibiting you from getting to work on time the last few days?” What has been the issue with your and Sarah’s dispute?” -Joe may say his wife is out of town and he is just having trouble getting himself and the kids ready on time. He voluntarily will probably say that he’ll make more of an effort to be on time, he didn’t realize it his tardiness was impacting both customers and his co-workers.” Joe may say Sarah is moody and defensive, here you direct him to be behavioral based, not personality based. By asking, well do you say she is moody? can you describe what she does when she is moody? Resolve it till you get to a point where you can come to agreement on what behaviors/performance is acceptable Sandwich it back- Joe, like a said you’re a key component of our customer service team, I appreciate your hard work.
  • at the root of us all, we just want to feel valued and useful. Many people are, but they aren’t told they are. And if they’re told, sometimes actions speak louder than words- say “your great” but nothing is tied to it based on what is motivating to them -Don’t make the mistake of giving your rock star all the work and letting others off with less. You may subconsciously think it is motivating to them- hey I trust you, I’m giving you the biggest work load. Even though you are working 12 hours a day at the same rate I pay Joe who produces half your results and is annoying, you still just gotta know your my rock star because I give you all the work! Reward those who work hard with what is motivating to them- more money, time off, professional development opportunities, opportunities to lead, etc.
  • 1.   Timely -  All rewards should be given immediately after the behavior is demonstrated.  If someone completes a project on time and on budget, lands a new deal for your company or department, goes the extra mile to help a coworker, fixes a machine that has been down for over a week, etc., you should thank or reward the person for that effort right away.  Don't wait until next week and definitely don't wait until their next performance review. 2. Specific -  Reference what behavior or action you want to continue.  A pat on the back or a "that-a-boy" may leave someone wondering exactly what you are praising them for.    For example,  a good specific praise may be, "Jim,  I really appreciate how you stayed late to help John complete the quarterly mail outs.   It not only helped him understand how they are done, but it gave him the confidence to know that you care and that he can handle it on his own next time."  3.   Sincere -  People can see through a rehearsed or forced reward or praise.  Don't say it or give it if you don't mean it.  Actions speak louder than words sometimes 4. Personal-  This is where what motivates one person, may not motivate another.  Jim stayed late, so he may want an afternoon off to spend time with his family.  He would find this rewarding.  John, however, may value a gift card to the Starbucks down the street since he is addicted to those chi lattes.  The key to this one is to know your people.  5.   Proportional-  All rewards should be in proportion to the time and effort expended on the behavior you want to continue.   Staying late one night may only warranted a sincere thank you.  Staying late all  all month may warrant a day off, or more.    If staying late for a month led to saving a key customer account and helping land another key customer that is going to double your revenue, a bonus check in proportion to the revenue or profit generated may be in order. 
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  • Transcript of "Finding and keeping the right staff "

    1. 1. Finding and Keeping the Right Staff
    2. 2. The tiers of job postingsOld Way: Put asign in yourwindowNew Way: post onyour webpageKey: Are you anemployer of choiceor a frequentedplace of business?
    3. 3. The tiers of job postingsOld Way: put anad in thenewspaperNew Way:advertise on jobposting sitesKey: Find the rightfit for you
    4. 4. Online Advertising SourcesNational SitesLocal SitesSites targetedtowards certainindustries orprofessionsCollege CareerCenters
    5. 5. The tiers of job postingsWay 1: Staffing agencyWay 2: HeadhunterKey to 1: Do you need togive people a trial run?Key to 2: Do you needspecific expertise and haveno time to recruit?
    6. 6. Go Find them!Old Way: Networkin personNew Way: Networkthrough professionalsocial media.Key: Recruiting thepassive job seekerleads to the mostsuccessful hires.
    7. 7. QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
    8. 8. Patient recruiting
    9. 9. Analyze and know what works for you!
    10. 10. Selection
    11. 11. Skill vs. Will
    12. 12. Assessing Skill
    13. 13. Assessing Will
    14. 14. QuickTime™ and a H.264 decompressorare needed to see this picture.
    15. 15. Accountant? To work asAccountant an assistant to a High D?
    16. 16. Retention- How to keep a Rock Star and make sure they stay One
    17. 17. 1. Define SuccessWhat tune needs to be sung?
    18. 18. Define Success The Performance Evaluation
    19. 19. 2. Coach SuccessGive them voice lessons.
    20. 20. Coach Success The Performance Development PlanUse the following scale to rate the employee on the following factors:1= No Experience- Needs Significant Improvement2= Little Experience- Improvement Needed3= Satisfactory/Average4=Above Average5=Excellent Category Self-Ratinga.Technical Skills _________b. Technical Knowledge _________c. Quality of Work Product _______(comprehensive, accurate, timely, etc.) _________
    21. 21. Coach Success The Performance Development Plan Discuss Questions Such As:1. What professional goals would you like to set for yourself to be accomplished in 6 months?2. What factors contribute to your success here?3. What factors have limited your success here?
    22. 22. Keys to Coaching feedback
    23. 23. Keys to Coaching feedback SpecificBehavioral Based
    24. 24. Keys to Coaching feedback
    25. 25. Keys to Coaching feedback
    26. 26. Keys to Coaching feedback
    27. 27. 3. Recognize & Reward Success Tell people they are rock stars
    28. 28. Keys to RecognitionKNOW YOUR PEOPLE!!!TimelySpecificSincerePersonalProportional
    29. 29. ?
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