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Clinic Animal Flow / Process
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Clinic Animal Flow / Process

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Published in: Lifestyle, Health & Medicine

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  • 1. Animal Flow Waiting area If people will wait with their animals, be sure they have sun and rain protection, chairs, and slip leashes for better control of their pets. Intake The intake volunteer logs client information. A volunteer records the weight of the animal, and a vet performs a pre-surgery examination. When the animal is close to surgery time, she receives premedication. Preparation Volunteers induce, intubate, catheterize, shave, and scrub the animal. Fluids are given if recommended by examining vet. Time and quantity of induction is noted. Induction should be timed so as to minimize the wait from the prep table to an open surgery table. Surgery The vet spays or neuters the animal. A roving vet tech takes vital statistics throughout surgery. Once the animal moves to recovery, the surgery area is thoroughly cleaned and the instrument pack is sterilized. Immediate Recovery The recovery volunteer checks for medical notes (i.e. more fluids required, etc.) and takes regular Temperature, Pulse and Respiration measurements. Temperature is monitored carefully, and blankets and warm water bottles are used as required (latex gloves filled with hot water can serve as hot water bottles). The animal is extubated. If tattoos are to be used, they should be given at this stage, when the animal is out of surgery but still somewhat anesthetized. Later Recovery When the animal is awake enough to walk easily, he’s taken to later recovery. Volunteer vaccinates, deworms, performs any other services requested by veterinarians, and fills out the vaccination record for the owner. At this stage, animals will need to be either kenneled or tied to prevent escape. Discharge When the animal is alert and walking around, she can be discharged. Owner should be provided with discharge instructions and vaccination record. Before discharge, volunteer checks that all services have been performed and checks for additional medical notes on paperwork (i.e. antibiotics to go home, etc.). Discharge of animal is noted on intake log.