#ASAE13 LH67
Welcome!
Get to know each other before we start!
– Name
– Organization
– Talk about your best volunteer exper...
#ASAE13 LH67
Micro-Volunteering: Pave the
Way to Continued Involvement
August 5, 2013
3:15 pm – 4:30 pm
Hashtag:#ASAE13 LH...
#ASAE13 LH67
Today‟s Questions
• What were micro-volunteering‟s original goals?
• How are associations managing micro-
vol...
#ASAE13 LH67
What were micro-
volunteering‟s original
goals?
#ASAE13 LH67
The Source
• ASAE‟s, The Decision to Volunteer, Beth
Gazley, PhD and Monica Dignam
– Published August 2008
– ...
#ASAE13 LH67
Key Takeaways
The power of the
direct ask
Involve younger
generations – but
in a different
experience
A meani...
#ASAE13 LH67
Key Questions
• Do you know and keep track of the various ad hoc or informal
services they provide?
• Do you ...
#ASAE13 LH67
Discuss
• Anything else?
– What do you hope to gain from this session?
#ASAE13 LH67
How are associations
managing micro-
volunteering?
#ASAE13 LH67
Demographics
N=93
Membership
Size
#ASAE13 LH67
Staffing
• Majority have variety of staff involved with
volunteer efforts
– Majority (67.44%) have several st...
#ASAE13 LH67
Approaches to Micro Volunteering
48.39%
48.39%
90.32%
91.40%
100%
0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% 100.00% 1...
#ASAE13 LH67
Popularity of Opportunities
SPEAKING/PRESENTING TO MEMBER
GROUPS (85.4%)
CONTENT DEVELOPER FOR
CONFERENCE
PUB...
#ASAE13 LH67
Other ideas….
Review
• Awards
• Legislative bills
• Accreditation or certification applications
• Software te...
#ASAE13 LH67
Micro-Volunteer Recruitment
30.86%
33.33%
54.32%
64.20%
80.25%
0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% 100.00%
Offe...
#ASAE13 LH67
Training
21.05%
26.32%
26.32%
26.32%
31.58%
36.84%
57.89%
Live Webcast focused on association 101
information...
#ASAE13 LH67
Evaluation
6.10%
7.32%
7.32%
8.54%
17.07%
60.98%
0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00%
For each activity only
For...
#ASAE13 LH67
Evaluation Tool
None
26 total
Anecdotally
13 total: 6 staff; 4 both;
3 volunteer
Surveys
8 total: all volunte...
#ASAE13 LH67
Recognition
15.79%
23.68%
23.68%
32.89%
52.63%
57.89%
0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00%
Certificate
Listing o...
#ASAE13 LH67
Recognition
#ASAE13 LH67
Other Recognition
• Conference program book or award presentation
• We have a monthly award for volunteers
• ...
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Pipeline
Bylaw
Mandated
Committees
Longer Term - Task
Forces & Chapters
Micro Volunteering
#ASAE13 LH67
Approaches to Micro Volunteer
Retention
4.50%
4.50%
4.50%
9%
11.40%
13.60%
50%
0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00%
Pro...
#ASAE13 LH67
Indicators for Advancement
31.25%
68.75%
81.25%
87.50%
They receive a high evaluation
score (e.g., as a speak...
#ASAE13 LH67
Pipeline Recruitment
4.40%
6.70%
8.90%
13.30%
28.90%
37.80%
Connect with committee chairs
based upon expertis...
#ASAE13 LH67
Who Appoints?
Alert!
Data from
Follow-up
Survey with 19
respondents.
100%
50%
75%
66.67%
22.22%
75%
50%
66.67...
What can you learn from the
NJSCPA experience
#ASAE13 LH67
Micro-volunteering 2.0
Click to add text
#ASAE13 LH67
Micro-volunteering 2.0
Click to add text
#ASAE13 LH67
Micro-volunteering 2.0
Interested
Involved
Invested
Intentional
Inductors
Initiators
Renewal Leadership
#ASAE13 LH67
Micro-volunteering 2.0
“The fact is that volunteering is a decision –
and is rarely spontaneous.
Volunteers m...
#ASAE13 LH67
Intentional │Inductor │ Initiator │ Leadership
Members Don’t Know:
Why they should volunteer
How to volunteer...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
2003 Key Concerns
2004 The Hidden Crisis
2005 Updated Strategic Plan
2006 Governance Task ...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
Key Findings: Governance
 Most Trustees are quite positive about the volunteer
experience...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
Member Study Areas for Concern
Modest desire for involvement
• Only 17% of respondents are...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
Volunteer Relations Department
• Create a Volunteer Relations Operating Plan
• Generate me...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
Challenges
• Members selecting “too many”
choices on the Volunteer
Interest Profile
• Volu...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
Successes
• Simplified and centralized process
• Created videos to help with awareness iss...
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
#ASAE13 LH67
Case Study: NJSCPA
Successes
• Increased awareness as engagement is being talked about
leadership and staff
•...
How can your association
improve its micro-
volunteering efforts?
#ASAE13 LH67
Food for Thought
1. Get all your volunteer managers onboard with the concept. Create
consistency and process ...
#ASAE13 LH67
Contact us
Carolyn Hook
Director, Membership and Operations
New Jersey Society of Certified Public
Accountant...
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Micro-Volunteering: Pave the Way to Continued Involvement

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Micro-Volunteering: Pave the Way to Continued Involvement presented by Carolyn Hook, NJSCPA.org and Katie Paffhouse, IFT.org at ASAE Annual 2013
Take a critical look at the micro-volunteer trend, with a focus on what’s working, what’s not, and how these little volunteer activities fit into the big picture. What happens to micro volunteers after their service is complete? Are they really engaged? Examine different volunteer models and opportunities to identify which is right for your association and your members.

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  • -Carolyn & Katie
  • -We said we’d focus on what’s working, what’s not and how these little activities fit into the big picture.
  • Top methods by which members recruited into activities were through participation in chapters or annual meetings and through a request by staff or other volunteers. Involve younger generations – but in a different experience 7.5% of Millennials and 10.2% of GenExs were asked by others to volunteer as opposed to 14% for larger groups. -Younger generations – for every one respondent who plans to continue volunteers, two respondents plan to leave and one more is ambivalent (page 52) A meaningful experience keeps them coming back – above all, they want to be involved effectively.  Acknowledge and recognize the ‘ad hoc’ volunteer – most volunteers are performing low-profile services such as mentoring, member recruitment, technical writing, etc. Suggestion was staff identify, support and acknowledge all volunteer contributions (a total of 36.4% of survey respondents report volunteer activities for org, yet only 6.8% of those had been identified by org)Org strategies can support or discourage volunteering - #1 reason lack of information about opportunitiesNeed an understanding of opportunities & open spotsNeed a way to track and evaluate
  • These were the key questions for takeaway –survey results will help to inform answers
  • Have document open for people to document instead of flip chart.
  • Analyzed association’s approach based on volunteer management basic principles: Recruit2 - Retain3 - Review4 - Recognize5 – RewardAssumptionsmicro volunteer program sometimes struggle to find volunteer leadersdesire to provide meaningful activities for volunteers (and the org)need to grow some volunteer involvements to longer term commitments
  • Distributed April – May 2013Promoted via ASAE Councils & Communities93 respondentsType of association: 26.14% trade; 61.36% individual; 13.64% hybridMembership size: 5.38% 300 or less; 5.28% 301-999 members; 32.26% 1000-4999 members (4 respondents); 56.99% 5000 or more (4 respondents)Scope: 37.63% international; 49.46% national; 1.08% regional; 10.75% state; 1.08% local
  • How many FTE serve as main points of contacts for volunteer recruitment, retention and activity development?
  • These opportunities had 0% selection:Leader-level/governance involvement – boards, standing committees, component leadershipAnnual committees, activities requiring annual sign upLong-term task force/project based opportunities (1-3 years)
  • One thing not answered – are these the most frequently used & tracked or simply most frequently tracked? Decision to Volunteer stated many volunteers identified as volunteers in areas associations did not always track (mentoring, etc.)…recommend this for future studiesCarolyn – approach to data – one point moving forward+ People were maintaining lists outside of our database, some no lists were maintained. + Plus we had new micro-volunteering activities with no history. + Put data in going forward, a handful went back if they had data and it wasn’t burdensome. + Using it in limited capacity at the moment for future recruitment, not historical analysis.
  • ‘jarring set of data’ – good news is it is a personal ask, although it is a LOT of time spent asking for a LOT of little volunteer opportunities. Are we focusing our time poorly? Are all volunteers equal? -Weekly e-newsletter-Standing invitation on websiteStaff recommendations“We have a "super star" volunteer code in our database to denote those who do great work that is prompt.”
  • in-person meetingcurrently it's spotty, depends on the staff liaison; but we are moving toward a more consistent package of orientation materialsThe chair, usually a board member, may provide information on the purpose of the project group but no actual training.
  • Question is – how to do this cost effectively and correctly.
  • Is the job finished? Did it meet our expectations?Was the product they produced useful to the organization and its members.Interestingly, many see this as a need. How should it be tracked for better progress? - This is a key step to bringing the relationship to a deeper level. At the very least, ask if they would do this again. Ask carolyn – should we follow=up with respondents regarding staff time & resources spent on this? After all, if they are micro-volunteers, should time spent evaluating replace something staff already do? What has this helped accelerate when done? (Assuming limited resources)
  • Notice – majority of recognition is CHEAP and easy! (Although written thank you note does require some time) -How do you create consistency with this? Do you go out once a year to someone who did something and do generic? Note – be sure this doesn’t ‘overwhelm’ recognition for longer term commitments.
  • NEWNJSCPA Thank You CardNJSCPA “Thank You Volunteers” section of website http://www.njscpa.org/volunteer-contribute/thankyouNJSCPA department in bi-monthly magazine called “Get Involved” highlights volunteer activity, includes articles written by component members, volunteers, photosNJSCPA Videos features volunteers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq-VDQOQKsc&list=UUEp3UvlHgp1tJCrM_bBve0A With permission, NJSCPA sends a letter to supervisors of young professionals who write for Young CPA newsletter, recognizing member as a stand out volunteer noting that their volunteer activity positively contributes to their professional role. Includes copy of article. Sends a copy to YCPA and a framed copy of the article.KATIE – DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING YOU CAN ADD? Can we go out to the internet? WE could click through.
  • Cool idea- Multi-year recognition for multi-year commitment Long-term get free recertification or multiple benefits tiered out (e.g., our Champion ambassador-type program offers special shirts etc. upon accepted application, then a certificate and recertification benefit after 1 and 2 year terms are successfully completed.)
  • Now we begin approaching the million dollar questions – how do we advance micro volunteers?
  • Note – one of the respondents viewed it as important to ensure people didn’t return – they need fresh perspectives! Other option also mentioned We try to keep them involved by attempting to work on projects they bring forward.Provide example – AMS using a points system. (Have self-imposed system – after 3 minutes recommend moving to online discussion)
  • New question – it is a problem to advance all? They demonstrate good leadership skillsit varies, but is usually a combination of some/all of the aboveInput from staff liaisons
  • Interesting – two mentioned leaders academies. Use of phrase ‘be more intentional’. New idea - There are built-in incentives like certificate in governance they can add to their resume, or prestige of playing and executive role, We do a good job between long term to big time committees. Is this too time consuming for micro volunteers?
  • All respondents have staff recommend.Interestingly, no clear pattern between trade vs hybridvs individual associations. 2 Others:Council or Committee ChairThe Nominating committee picks our First VP (who moves up after that to Pres) and BOD. Our Pres/Pres-Elect/First VP pick the committee members. President picks task force members. Staff recommend committee members.
  • In order to define Micro-volunteering 2.0, let me draw a comparison to the Web v. Web 2.0.The first generation of sites on the World Wide Web tended to be static points of information, such as personal and corporate Web sites with readable information only. Here’s The Toronto Star from June 1998. It’s basically “old news” -- even if it’s “today’s news.” It was sort of like going to the library, or reading a magazine or newspaper -- but you did it on your computer. But who goes to the library every day? And while you may have read the newspaper everyday, you didn’t call the New York Times for updates throughout the day.
  • Gradually there was a shift and we saw Web sites that let you read, write, and actively participate. Here is the Toronto Star today. They have “Developing” news, What’s trending, the temperature from the very moment I took the screen shot. The news is constantly updated. In fact, in the time I put together this slide, the temperature changed and the lead story changed. CLICKSo now you’re reading the paper, and someone came and gave you new paper 5 minutes later because some woman got arrested. And today you can help write the newspaper by sending email, texts, photos and video of what’s happening out your window. Or read an article and post your opinion about how wrong the author is about his premise. Then you think so much of your own opinion that you can create your own blog about it. This is how the Web went to Web 2.0.
  • NEWSo what about Micro-volunteering and Micro-volunteering 2.0?Katie covered micro-volunteering’s original objectives:Involving younger generations – but in a different experienceGiving all generations opportunities to participate in small increments of time because of busy life styles and some employers don’t allow discretionary time for these activitiesAnd we saw that there are a many types of micro-volunteering activities going onUltimate goal is to get more people involved in meaningful ways because greater involvement leads to greater member satisfaction and retention.So far the research has shown that we’ve been following the 3-Is model – which I’ve typically seen applied to membership, but I’m going to apply it to volunteering. CLICK Members get INTERESTED because we are sending “Calls to Volunteer”, sharing testimonials and videos about the value of being involved.CLICK Members get INVOLVED because we’ve added quick and easy tasks that they can get credit for with their employers, and add to their linked in profile.CLICK Members get INVESTED – even in the quick and easy tasks – by doing them again.How do we shift to 2.0? With the internet we went from static to interactive which can easily translate to when we see a checkbook or mailbox member get involved, see their name in the magazine, get thank you note, be completely satisfied and renew. CLICK Isn’t that success? Is there more?Yes. In Micro-volunteering 2.0 – CLICK We want to see members become INTENTIONAL about being involved -- where they are taking the first step and saying “I want to be involved!”CLICK We want to see members become INDUCTORS – where they are exposing involvement to other members and bringing them into association involvementCLICK We want them to become INITIATORS – where they are creating and managing involvement opportunities.CLICK These members move on to Leadership roles – because as Katie pointed out 100% of the associations surveyed had Governance level volunteer opportunities. We often here these members called “shapers.” They are committed to the organization, its mission and initiatives and want to make a difference in its future and the future of their profession or industry.
  • Share: Who has found this to be true about your own involvement in ASAE or other organizations?What kinds of questions came up when you made your decision?
  • Discussion Set Up: What’s keeping your uninvolved members and your micro-volunteers from going 2.0? I don’t mean time or busyness –we’ve already solved that by having micro-volunteering opportunities. And some members may never have time – and that’s okay.In 2008, when asked if they wanted to become more involved in NJSCPA, 40% of the non-volunteer population responded “don’t know.” When asked “do you know how to get involved in NJSCPA chapters or groups/committees or as a speaker/author, 48% of non-volunteers said “no.”Overall we found a general lack of awareness, including members who are unaware of how to get involved and those that are unsure about whether or not they want to become more involved. CLICK Here’s what else our members don’t know.What’s missing from this list? (record on flip chart or link to word document?)CLICKLet’s hear what you are doing or what we can do to help members shift to 2.0? (record on flip chart or link to word document?)At NJSCPA we tried to address many of these concerns when we realized our leadership pipeline was in trouble.
  • As early as 2003, the NJSCPA began looking at member engagement when the NJSCPAs Planning Committee was reinvigorated to update the strategic plan which had been last updated in 1997. Chapter and Committee leaders identified key concerns as finding and developing leaders, increasing member participation and making meetings more valuable to participants.Our 2004 research study concluded that leadership succession was a “hidden crisis” and recommended that we explore alternative ways for finding and accelerating development of leaders in the profession.The “hidden crisis” plus twelve other issues were further evaluated as the Planning Committee worked to examine the Society’s mission and update the strategic plan. In September 2005, the Board was presented with 5 Strategic Initiatives, which over the next two years became the 4 Pillars of the Society’s updated NJSCPA Strategic Plan. (Provide membership community, support education, encourage high professional standards, advocate for the CPA and public interests)Member engagement and governance and leadership development are initiatives of our first pillar: Provide Membership Community.NJSCPA jumped right in with a major Governance/Operational Effectiveness effort to evaluate its governance model and develop a succession planning strategy for continuously identifying, attracting, grooming and motivating talented and committed people in order to increase the leadership pipeline.The Planning Committee began a Long-Term Member Needs Assessment, which had a focus on engagement, to also address these initiatives.
  • The key findings in Governance were mostly directed toward making changes to the Board structure – making it smaller, changing the term lengths. But you see, the optimal governance structure can only be accomplished through effective volunteer identification and engagement. We didn’t know how to fill the pipeline. Our nominating committee would get together and look at lists of board members and chapter and committee leaders for the current and prior 2 years – which could have been 250 names – to see if they knew anyone or liked anyone. Then they would come up with a list of potentials having no idea if these people were even interested in being on the Board of Trustees or being a leader. We recycled leaders year after year and the nominating appointment process took several months. And we had members serving in multiple leadership roles – as a chapter officer and a committee chair.
  • The member study proved that involvement was a critical area for concern. While we knew members weren’t getting involved, the study showed us why. Members didn’t know how to get involved.They didn’t know how involvement was beneficial both professionally and personally.And they didn’t have the time.
  • The Volunteer Relations Department was established in early 2009 to centralize the volunteer identification and outreach processes and management and cultivation of the volunteer experience. The “department” is unique in that it is comprised of both staff and members (our Volunteer Relations Committee) who work together to take the lead in coordinating and improving the NJSCPA volunteer experience as part of the Volunteer Relations Operating Plan.
  • In 2010 The Society’s website redesign and new AMS helped launch our Volunteer Interest Profile – which centralizes the process for getting involved and makes it easy to find short-term volunteering projects, ongoing community participation and leadership-level positions. No one will be considered for a leader-level position unless they complete the volunteer profile.We established a process that includes phone calls from staff for non-leadership activities and phone calls from members of the Volunteer Relations Committee for all leadership positions and appointed committees. The phone call is designed to discuss qualifications, establish if the role is right for the member at this time, and if not how can the member prepare now to take the position in the future. If it’s not a match, the committee member looks for another way the member can get involved. NEWThe Society members of the Volunteer Relations Committee are also charged with talking to other members at various events about their involvement. We provide them with business cards that include talking point reminders on the back. The database maintains each member’s interest in their record along with notes from member or staff phone calls and other information.
  • NEWMembers selecting “too many” choices on the Volunteer Interest ProfileForm is too long. In the process of updating our online form to filter by career stage, motivation, professional interests,Volunteer opportunities are managed by multiple staffVolunteer tracking and follow up is not their main priorityToo many volunteers, not enough opportunitiesHow do we meet the expectationsLeaders don’t get it.Leaders don’t attach value to the micro-volunteering experience and make YCPAs do meeting check in, when YCPAs want something meaninful.How can we re-train members who are inclined to do it the way it’s always been done.Social mediaGreat prospects for future involvement, how can we track “regulars” and invite them to do more. Social media championsDoing this primarily through our private online community which tracks contributors
  • NEWWhile we don’t have it all perfected, we’ve had many successes over the last 4 years. A few that I’m excited about:Being a member of the Volunteer Relations Committee is one of the most sought after positions by outgoing leaders. Last year we had a member who hasn’t really been involved, but has been out of work long term. He pitched the creation of a networking group for our unemployed members to talk about their job search experiences, ask for input on cover letters or resumes, etc.. We didn’t jump right in with a live group, but started with an online private community – free from recruiters. The member and I are acting as the community champions posting relevant articles, tips, upcoming job fairs, jobs from our job bank and links to our other resources for members in transition. We had another member ask us to create a community or in person interest group about another topic. Because we typically won’t create a community without a significant number of members interested, we declined creating the group – but this member agreed to post regular blogs for us. In fact we have several members who blog regularly – members we didn’t ask.Two weeks ago we held a young professionals kickball tournament. This is our third and most successful tournament – we had 18 teams of 10 from 15 CPA firms play – nearly double the attendees from last year. The firms love the competition and support sending their young people by sponsoring their team. About a third of the participants have never been to any young professional events, a third have only come to this event and the rest are regularly engaged. The event raised $2700 and collected toys for a children’s charity.In case anyone asks:o Primary reason members participated (open ended): To Gain or Share Knowledge (52.5%), Networking (21.3%), Give Back/Be Involved (20.5%), o Level of Satisfaction Very Satisfied (59.3%), Satisfied (32.9%), Unsatisfied (6.4%), Very Unsatisfied (1.4%)o 66% Served on more than one group/committeeo 89% felt they accomplished something meaningfulo 88% got what they expected from their experienceo 93% want to continue to serveo 72% was second or more year on the group/committee
  • I mentioned that our Volunteer Relations Committee is charged with talking to volunteers at our annual convention and other events. They use our Volunteer Match Game which asks members to pick two items on the chart that they resonate with. Then our Volunteer expert identifies opportunities that fit and help the member complete our profile.
  • Remember our 3 month long nominating appointment process where the committee was picking their favorite members and making phone calls to members who had no interest in being a trustee? Now, they are supplied with a list of qualified members, who have said they want to be involved in these positions. The process now takes 6-8 hours, including meetings and phone calls. And we have been pretty close to 100% success in keeping a goal of not having any member serve in more than one leadership position. Since we’re tracking member interests and micro-volunteering activities, we can cross promote to members with similar interests. This is especially helpful when limited positions are available for a standing committee. We have many members interested in being part of our Scholarship Fund Board – but there are limited positions available each year and an experience requirement. For those who don’t make it to the Board we ask them to participate in our Pay It Forward program – where members talk to high school students about the profession and our available scholarships. We can also ask them to review scholarship essay submissions and interview scholarship candidates or be a mentor to our scholarship recipients. And we
  • Take Aways – sample thank yous, messages, evaluationsNeed-Warm up the ad hoc volunteers for the bigger ask-How to recruit volunteers Pre – Eval-Know available flexible volunteer opportunities based on virtual and face-to-face & amount of time and time of year Making Micro Volunteering Resource EffectivePre-recorded training that new volunteers must participate in (increases satisfaction and sets expectations)Immediate recognition after activity (in person, give applause and verbal thanks.) Post volunteering 2-3 weeks after, send a thank you email with a summary of impactTrack in database – open to returning or not Eval – DANGER – LOOK OUT FOR EXPECTATIONS AND LACK OF FOLLOW-THROUGHrate experience (1 to 5 scale, with 5 very satisfied)Helping you to feel that you are giving back to your professionHaving opportunities to meet, work and socialize with others in your field or your professionWorking with others towards a common goalUsing your existing skillsFeeling respected, appreciated and valuedOpportunity to take a leadership roleAbility to make choices about when you volunteerHelping you to connect with the mission of the organizationAbility to make choices about what you do as a volunteerLearning new skillsReceiving incentiviesHow likely is it that you will be a volunteer for IF within the next twelve months? (Very unlikely to very likely) -rate what else interested in-include what skills you want to share  Key TakeawaysMost Popular Micro Volunteer OpportunitiesSpeaking/presenting to member groupsContent Developer/Provider for Conference, publication, etc.Event onsite volunteer The mid-level opportunities have much more variety:Large membership associations favored Medium to small favored answering technical questions    EvaluationsMajority of associations, regardless of size, do not evaluate experience. If they do, it is primarily for overall experience and select activities RecognitionLevels of recognition are all over the place, with medium small and small overall having more recognition than the larger cohorts AttritionThere hasn’t been a large poaching of long term volunteers for short term opportunities; however, several associations have noticed a switch.
  • Micro-Volunteering: Pave the Way to Continued Involvement

    1. 1. #ASAE13 LH67 Welcome! Get to know each other before we start! – Name – Organization – Talk about your best volunteer experience – First concert Micro-Volunteering: Pave the Way to Continued Involvement
    2. 2. #ASAE13 LH67 Micro-Volunteering: Pave the Way to Continued Involvement August 5, 2013 3:15 pm – 4:30 pm Hashtag:#ASAE13 LH67 Carolyn Hook, Director, Membership and Operations, New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants Katie Paffhouse, CAE, Senior Manager - Divisions & Community, Institute of Food Technologists
    3. 3. #ASAE13 LH67 Today‟s Questions • What were micro-volunteering‟s original goals? • How are associations managing micro- volunteering? • What can you learn from the NJSCPA experience? • How can your association improve its micro- volunteering efforts? • What will you do upon your return to work?
    4. 4. #ASAE13 LH67 What were micro- volunteering‟s original goals?
    5. 5. #ASAE13 LH67 The Source • ASAE‟s, The Decision to Volunteer, Beth Gazley, PhD and Monica Dignam – Published August 2008 – 23 cosponsoring organizations – 26,305 of 185,975 volunteers responded
    6. 6. #ASAE13 LH67 Key Takeaways The power of the direct ask Involve younger generations – but in a different experience A meaningful experience keeps them coming back Acknowledge and recognize the ‘ad hoc’ volunteer Org strategies can support or discourage volunteering
    7. 7. #ASAE13 LH67 Key Questions • Do you know and keep track of the various ad hoc or informal services they provide? • Do you keep a history of volunteer involvement in your association so that you can detect a natural progression between formal, informal or other levels of activity? • When your volunteers „graduate‟ to higher levels of involvement, who moves forward and who drops out? Do you actively promote their involvement? • Can you identify members who might be looking for increased responsibilities? • (Just Added!) How much time/resources should you spend on this?
    8. 8. #ASAE13 LH67 Discuss • Anything else? – What do you hope to gain from this session?
    9. 9. #ASAE13 LH67 How are associations managing micro- volunteering?
    10. 10. #ASAE13 LH67 Demographics N=93 Membership Size
    11. 11. #ASAE13 LH67 Staffing • Majority have variety of staff involved with volunteer efforts – Majority (67.44%) have several staff who work with volunteers without centralized volunteer management – Average 5 ½ FTE for volunteer recruitment, retention and activity development – Average 29% of staff work with volunteers • smaller staff - 56%
    12. 12. #ASAE13 LH67 Approaches to Micro Volunteering 48.39% 48.39% 90.32% 91.40% 100% 0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% 100.00% 120.00% Occasional Quick Tasks Limited/Short term (task force, project team) Annual/Ongoing Governance (boards, standing committees, component leadership)
    13. 13. #ASAE13 LH67 Popularity of Opportunities SPEAKING/PRESENTING TO MEMBER GROUPS (85.4%) CONTENT DEVELOPER FOR CONFERENCE PUBLICATION, ETC. (75.6%) CONTENT PROVIDER (62.2%) EVENT AD HOC VOLUNTEER (57.3%) WRITER (56.1%)
    14. 14. #ASAE13 LH67 Other ideas…. Review • Awards • Legislative bills • Accreditation or certification applications • Software testing Grow • Fundraise • Recruit members Share • Moderated or facilitated a discussion group • Participated in a discussion group, expert panel or report • Festival host
    15. 15. #ASAE13 LH67 Micro-Volunteer Recruitment 30.86% 33.33% 54.32% 64.20% 80.25% 0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% 100.00% Offer sign-up portal to be in a pool or on a list Post openings in member community Blast email to members Volunteers recruit the short term volunteers Staff recruit the short term volunteers Alert! DTV states the top three ways members find out and agree to volunteer opportunities are at: 1. Local Chapter Meeting 2. Meeting or conference 3. Asked by another volunteer
    16. 16. #ASAE13 LH67 Training 21.05% 26.32% 26.32% 26.32% 31.58% 36.84% 57.89% Live Webcast focused on association 101 information Recorded Webcast focused on specific job tasks Recorded Webcast focused on association 101 information We don't officially train these leaders Live Webcast focused on specific job tasks One-on-one coaching Step by step instructions via document Alert! Data from Follow-up Survey with 19 respondents.
    17. 17. #ASAE13 LH67 Evaluation 6.10% 7.32% 7.32% 8.54% 17.07% 60.98% 0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% For each activity only For overall experience only For each activity and overall experience For select activities only For select activities and overall experience We don't ask them to evaluate their experience Alert! DTV found meaningful experiences keep volunteers coming back –how can you ensure you are meeting their needs without evaluation?
    18. 18. #ASAE13 LH67 Evaluation Tool None 26 total Anecdotally 13 total: 6 staff; 4 both; 3 volunteer Surveys 8 total: all volunteers or attendees Overall goals met 4 – unspecified Attendance 1
    19. 19. #ASAE13 LH67 Recognition 15.79% 23.68% 23.68% 32.89% 52.63% 57.89% 0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% 80.00% Certificate Listing on website or in brochures No official recognition Written thank you note Verbal recognition Thank you email
    20. 20. #ASAE13 LH67 Recognition
    21. 21. #ASAE13 LH67 Other Recognition • Conference program book or award presentation • We have a monthly award for volunteers • Credit for continuing professional development (2) • Tiered recognition gifts based on project length. • If they develop a publication, their name is published in the document/book/white paper itself. • Letter from president • Volunteer Reception at Convention
    22. 22. #ASAE13 LH67 Pipeline Bylaw Mandated Committees Longer Term - Task Forces & Chapters Micro Volunteering
    23. 23. #ASAE13 LH67 Approaches to Micro Volunteer Retention 4.50% 4.50% 4.50% 9% 11.40% 13.60% 50% 0.00% 20.00% 40.00% 60.00% Provide link for micro volunteers to… Share recommendations for volunteers… Personal outreach Don't focus on retention, just happens Ask at the end of project to renew Members self-identify for new projects None
    24. 24. #ASAE13 LH67 Indicators for Advancement 31.25% 68.75% 81.25% 87.50% They receive a high evaluation score (e.g., as a speaker) They have good attendance at meetings or required activities They are frequently engaged (e.g., posting a lot in the community) They ask for opportunities Alert! Data from Follow-up Survey with 19 respondents.
    25. 25. #ASAE13 LH67 Pipeline Recruitment 4.40% 6.70% 8.90% 13.30% 28.90% 37.80% Connect with committee chairs based upon expertise Set expectation for advancement No specific outreach; simply provide good experience General Communications None Specific Ask (oftentimes for top performers only)
    26. 26. #ASAE13 LH67 Who Appoints? Alert! Data from Follow-up Survey with 19 respondents. 100% 50% 75% 66.67% 22.22% 75% 50% 66.67% Staff Office of the President Board of Directors Separate task force/committee, such as Nominating Committee Appoints Recommends
    27. 27. What can you learn from the NJSCPA experience
    28. 28. #ASAE13 LH67 Micro-volunteering 2.0 Click to add text
    29. 29. #ASAE13 LH67 Micro-volunteering 2.0 Click to add text
    30. 30. #ASAE13 LH67 Micro-volunteering 2.0 Interested Involved Invested Intentional Inductors Initiators Renewal Leadership
    31. 31. #ASAE13 LH67 Micro-volunteering 2.0 “The fact is that volunteering is a decision – and is rarely spontaneous. Volunteers may deliberate for considerable amounts of time about whether to volunteer, the extent of their involvement and the degree to which what they‟ll be doing matches their needs.” ~ The Decision to Volunteer
    32. 32. #ASAE13 LH67 Intentional │Inductor │ Initiator │ Leadership Members Don’t Know: Why they should volunteer How to volunteer What opportunities are available Anyone else who is involved If their employers will support involvement What type of activity is a good fit for their career stage What type of activity matches their interests and skills How to talk to people about their current involvement Who to talk to about their involvement What the protocol is for initiating a new activity If they are “leadership material” If they can talk to someone about their involvement path What‟s expected of them
    33. 33. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA 2003 Key Concerns 2004 The Hidden Crisis 2005 Updated Strategic Plan 2006 Governance Task Force 2007 Long-Term Member Needs Assessment
    34. 34. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA Key Findings: Governance  Most Trustees are quite positive about the volunteer experience  Industry trends, member and staff feedback point to smaller, more experienced board  Volunteer identification and engagement are critical success factors for optimal governance  Increased continuity will lead to improved board performance  Fine tuning the board culture through effective communications and leadership
    35. 35. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA Member Study Areas for Concern Modest desire for involvement • Only 17% of respondents are interested in becoming more involved • 81% cite “lack of time” as a barrier to involvement Disconnect: expressed desire vs. behaviors • 44% of members want to get involved via chapters • 78% attend chapter CPE “occasionally” or “never” Few younger members in leadership ranks • Only 23 volunteer respondents have under 10 years of professional experience Knowledge and consideration of volunteer opportunities • 40% “don‟t know” if they want to become more involved
    36. 36. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA Volunteer Relations Department • Create a Volunteer Relations Operating Plan • Generate member excitement for volunteer opportunities • Centralize the opportunities and value of volunteer service • Identify prospective volunteers and match candidates with appropriate positions • Nurture and extend relationships with key members • Secure commitments for volunteer service • Thank volunteers for their service • Provide for a leadership pipeline • Make an annual report to the NJSCPA Board of Trustees
    37. 37. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA
    38. 38. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA Challenges • Members selecting “too many” choices on the Volunteer Interest Profile • Volunteer opportunities are managed by multiple staff • Too many volunteers, not enough opportunities • Leaders don‟t get it. • Social media
    39. 39. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA Successes • Simplified and centralized process • Created videos to help with awareness issues • Developed clear descriptions of each opportunity so members know what‟s involved • Received 750 Volunteer Interest Profiles since 2009 • Eliminated “hidden crisis.” Leadership pipeline for appointed committees and Board of Trustees no longer a concern • Increased involvement in micro-volunteering by Young CPAs in newly developed roles • Members contacting us to create communities • Established annual metrics for volunteer relations initiatives • Established baseline volunteer satisfaction for committee/community participation
    40. 40. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA
    41. 41. #ASAE13 LH67 Case Study: NJSCPA Successes • Increased awareness as engagement is being talked about leadership and staff • Decreased length of time of Nominating Committee appointment process • Recruited repeat facebook, twitter and private community posters to do other things • Tracked micro-volunteer activities in database • Cross-promoted volunteer activities • Recruited recent former leaders to keep them engaged • Identified areas of improvements to online profile, database & staff responsibilities • Increased employer support for engagement
    42. 42. How can your association improve its micro- volunteering efforts?
    43. 43. #ASAE13 LH67 Food for Thought 1. Get all your volunteer managers onboard with the concept. Create consistency and process efficiencies where possible to increase ROI. 2. Identify and implement quick wins – recorded trainings – template documents and evaluations – automatic thank you messages – Track superstars 3. Consider the larger picture: – What is the ROI in growing micro-volunteers? – How large of a volunteer pipeline do we need? – How fair and transparent does your long term volunteer identification process need to be? – What does your relationship with your components need to be?
    44. 44. #ASAE13 LH67 Contact us Carolyn Hook Director, Membership and Operations New Jersey Society of Certified Public Accountants chook@njscpa.ORG 973.226.4494 ext 221 @carolyn_hook Katie Paffhouse, CAE Senior Manager - Divisions & Community Institute of Food Technologists kpaffhouse@ift.org 312.604.0218 @kpaffhouse

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