HonorShame Seminar for Christian Ministry

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A seminar for Christian workers ministering in Majority World cultures where honor and shame are central values. The seminar explains honor and shame in culture, scripture, relationships, and …

A seminar for Christian workers ministering in Majority World cultures where honor and shame are central values. The seminar explains honor and shame in culture, scripture, relationships, and ministry.

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  • 1. HonorShame Seminar A Practical Missiology for Christian Workers HonorShame
  • 2. INTRODUCTION HonorShame
  • 3. How do you get from China to Iran? Good maps help us understand and navigate terrains. We need the right map to navigate HonorShame cultures. HonorShame
  • 4. “If all you have is a hammer…” The tools we use must account for the context. Our theology and missiology must consider HonorShame. HonorShame
  • 5. The goal of this presentation is to… CULTURE (1) explain honor & shame dynamics in cultures… SCRIPTURE (2) then examine the biblical teaching of honor & shame, so that… HonorShame
  • 6. A RELATIONAL MINISTRY CULTURE SCRIPTURE …(3) we can construct a relational ministry that appropriately connects cultural longings for honor with God‘s provision of honor. HonorShame
  • 7. For additional tools and resources, subscribe to the HonorShame blog. HonorShame
  • 8. CULTURE How can we understand Honor and Shame in other cultures? HonorShame
  • 9. GUILT SHAME Moral emotions that ensure „normal‟ behavior in various cultures • Individualistic, Western • Corporate, Majority World • From (written) rules & laws • From expectations, social roles • Introspective conscience • Community gossip • Affects transgressor • Affects the entire group • Confess, apologize • Hide, flee, attack • ―I made a mistake‖ (action) • ―I am a mistake‖ (being) • Solution: repayment, • Solution: grace, acceptance, forgiveness reincorporation HonorShame
  • 10. God saves us from shame & guilt (Ps 31 & 32) HonorShame
  • 11. Salvation from Shame: Psalm 31:11-18 11 Because of all my enemies, I am the utter contempt of my neighbors and an object of dread to my closest friends— those who see me on the street flee from me. 12 I am forgotten as though I were dead; I have become like broken pottery. 13 For I hear many whispering, ―Terror on every side!‖ They conspire against me and plot to take my life. I trust in you, LORD; I say, ―You are my God.‖ 15 My times are in your hands; deliver me from the hands of my enemies, from those who pursue me. 16 Let your face shine on your servant; save me in your unfailing love. 17 Let me not be put to shame, LORD, for I have cried out to you; but let the wicked be put to shame and be silent in the realm of the dead. 14 But HonorShame
  • 12. Salvation from Guilt: Psalm 32:1-2, 5 1 Blessed is the one whose transgressions are forgiven, whose sins are covered. 2 Blessed is the one whose sin the LORD does not count against them and in whose spirit is no deceit… 5 Then I acknowledged my sin to you and did not cover up my iniquity. I said, ―I will confess my transgressions to the LORD.‖ And you forgave the guilt of my sin. HonorShame
  • 13. 3 responses to sin “We have to reckon with three different types of reactions to transgressions of religiously sanctioned codes: fear, shame, and guilt.” Eugene Nida, Customs and Cultures Guilt Fear Shame Solution: Innocence Power Honor Reconciliation w/: Conscience spirits Community God is: Judge Warrior Father Key Metaphor: Legal (courtroom) Military (battlefield) Social (family) Ministry: Truth-encounter Power-encounter Communityencounter HonorShame
  • 14. shame No culture is entirely one orientation. Their cultural values can be mapped based on the strength of sin-response. U K US guilt fear HonorShame
  • 15. each cultural orientation roughly corresponds to a particular region in the world WEST (guilt-justice) SOUTH (fear-power) EAST (shame-honor) © Copyright Sasi Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan) HonorShame
  • 16. Certain global realities assign significance to a Christian missiology for HonorShame contexts EAST (shame-honor) © Copyright Sasi Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan) HonorShame
  • 17. total children in HonorShame cultures (indicating current and future population) © Copyright Sasi Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan) HonorShame
  • 18. abject poverty in HonorShame contexts (where people earning $1/day live) © Copyright Sasi Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan) HonorShame
  • 19. unreached nations = HonorShame nations © Copyright Sasi Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan) HonorShame
  • 20. Theological framework WEST (Augustinian/Protestant) EAST (??/undeveloped) SOUTH (Charismatic/Pentecostal) © Copyright Sasi Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan) HonorShame
  • 21. Global Realities Most of the world‘s population, poor, and unreached orient their lives and culture around honor and shame, yet Christian theology and missiology have largely neglected honor and shame. HonorShame
  • 22. What is Honor & Shame? Because they are abstract social concepts, honor and shame are hard to explicitly describe. How would you define honor and shame? HonorShame
  • 23. Honor = ‗acknowledgement of worth‘ Someone considers themself worthy of honor, then others acknowledge their claim to honor. synonyms: value, respect, status, prestige, reputation, dignity, face OT kavod – ―weight‖ NT time – “price, value‖ HonorShame
  • 24. Shame is a ‗negative public rating.‘ Shame is when others think back of you, and means disgrace, disconnection, and rejection. Eve, by Auguste Rodin (1881) HonorShame
  • 25. You have made us the taunt of our neighbors, the derision and scorn of those around us. You have made us a byword among the nations, a laughingstock among the peoples. All day long my disgrace is before me, and shame has covered my face. -Psalm 44:13-15 HonorShame
  • 26. The good and bad of shame • Good shame (aka, ‗discretionary‘ shame) refers to an appropriate sense of modesty, or concern with social norms. A person without good shame is deemed ‗shameless,‘ which is even worse than being ‗shameful.‘ • Bad shame (aka, ‗disgrace‘ shame) causes disgust and shamefulness. Bad shame erodes human worth and distances people from the community. HonorShame
  • 27. Causes of Honor & Shame 3 causes of honor and shame, Illustrated in the Prodigal Son (Lk 15) HonorShame
  • 28. Causes of Honor & Shame #1 – Faithfulness/ loyalty • social roles – fulfilling relational expectations • name – considering family reputation HonorShame
  • 29. How was the prodigal unfaithful to social roles and family name? ―There was a man who had two sons. And the younger of them said to his father, ‗Father, give me the share of the property that is coming to me.‘ And he divided his property between them. Not many days later, the younger son gathered all he had and took a journey into a far country.‖ HonorShame
  • 30. Causes of Honor & Shame #2 – Purity (the right thing, in the right place) • body – the body is the vessel of honor • clothing – apparel communicates status HonorShame
  • 31. How was prodigal defiled through his body and clothing? ―And there, he squandered his property in reckless living. And when he had spent everything, a severe famine arouse in that country, and he began to be in need. So he went and hired himself out to one of the citizens of that country, who sent him to be fed with the pods that the pigs ate, and no one gave him anything.‖ HonorShame
  • 32. Causes of Honor & Shame #3 – Strength/Power • aggression – using physical violence & verbal jousting • benefaction – using goods to acquire loyalty and honor HonorShame
  • 33. verbal jousting (Lk 13:10-17) In HonorShame societies, men verbally joust in public to acquire honor. These competitions commonly follow this 4-step pattern. Most of Jesus interactions with the Pharisees are exhibitions of verbal jousting for honor. Claim to honor 10 On a Sabbath Jesus was teaching in one of the synagogues, 11 and a woman was there who had been crippled by a spirit for eighteen years. She was bent over and could not straighten up at all. 12 When Jesus saw her, he called her forward and said to her, ―Woman, you are set free from your infirmity.‖ 13 Then he put his hands on her, and immediately she straightened up and praised God. Challenge of the honor claim 14 Indignant Riposte – quick verbal response 15 The Public verdict 17 When because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath, the synagogue leader said to the people, ―There are six days for work. So come and be healed on those days, not on the Sabbath.‖ Lord answered him, ―You hypocrites! Doesn‘t each of you on the Sabbath untie your ox or donkey from the stall and lead it out to give it water? 16 Then should not this woman, a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan has kept bound for eighteen long years, be set free on the Sabbath day from what bound her?‖ he said this, all his opponents were humiliated, but the people were delighted with all the wonderful things he was doing. HonorShame
  • 34. Causes of Honor & Shame #3 – Strength/Power • aggression -physical violence & verbal jousting • benefaction – gifting materials goods for relationships HonorShame
  • 35. How did the prodigal fail to portray strength? ―But when he came to himself, he said, ‗How many of my father‘s hired servants have more than enough bread, but I perish here with hunger! I will arise and go to my father, and I will say to him, ―Father, I have sinned against heaven and before you. I am no longer worthy to be called your son. Treat me as one of your hired servants.‖ HonorShame
  • 36. Causes of Honor & Shame (summary) unfaithfulness impurity  SHAME  rejection weakness exclusion _______________________________________ faithfulness purity strength  HONOR acceptance inclusion HonorShame
  • 37. Cultural Associations What cultural features do you associate with HonorShame cultures? HonorShame
  • 38. The following images are from East Meets West, by Yang Liu, a Chinese artist raised in Germany. They illustrate features of HonorShame cultures. Click here for more. HonorShame
  • 39. collectivism Western identity is rooted in the accomplishments of the individual. Personal rights and freedom of choice are strong cultural values. Majority World cultures are grouporiented. Because identity and security come from the group, people earnestly avoid negative group opinion‘s (shame). HonorShame
  • 40. collectivism “I think, therefore I am.” “We are, therefore I am.” Western identity is rooted in the accomplishments of the individual. Personal rights and freedom of choice are strong cultural values. Majority World cultures are grouporiented. Because identity and security come from the group, people earnestly avoid negative group opinion‘s (shame). HonorShame
  • 41. patronage Patronage is the predominant economic model for acquiring goods and resources in HonorShame societies. In patronage, a rich person provides material resources for the client‘s loyalty and praise. Consequently, those ‗big people‘ are granted unique powers and freedoms. In Western market economies where goods are purchased, the accumulation of honor through strategic gifting suggests corruption. HonorShame
  • 42. indirect communication In Eastern cultures, communication is a dance (―don‘t step on toes!), not a download (―give me the information asap!‖). People talk to manage social relationships, not exchange information. For this reason, great caution is taken to not rudely affront other people. By rephrasing words and speaking indirectly, they are actually being true to the relationship (i.e., loyal to people‘s honor). HonorShame
  • 43. event orientation People use time to confer honor. The event doesn‘t start at 4 p.m., but when everyone gets there. Identity is defined by the people we gather with, not the tasks we accomplish. So, to start without someone would be excluding them from the group – a shameful insult. When time is an instrument of honor, the most important typically arrive last. HonorShame
  • 44. drinks Cultural values even play a role in choice of drinks. For example, the teapot is shared by the group, with the flavor selected by the eldest person. As a symbol of honor, the youngest person (or host) serves the oldest. At Western meals, everybody orders their own drink based on personal preferences (i.e. Coke freestyle machine), honor or community play little role. HonorShame
  • 45. HonorShame are the core values undergirding many of the features of Majority World cultures. HonorShame is the plate holding everything up, the hub uniting the wheel. indirect communication reciprocity/gifting event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting HonorShame hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 46. But when Westerners use Justice-Guilt values to understand aspects of HonorShame cultures, the same events are negatively interpreted. Click forward to see how Justice-Guilt interprets each cultural feature. indirect communication reciprocity/gifting event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 47. Cultural Associations indirect communication reciprocity/gifting event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 48. Cultural Associations lying/deception reciprocity/gifting event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 49. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 50. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual purity orality gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 51. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism orality gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 52. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy gender roles feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 53. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism feasting Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 54. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 55. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 56. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 57. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances nepotism/corruption group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 58. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances nepotism/corruption group pressure high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 59. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances nepotism/corruption group pressure inequality/oppression holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 60. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances nepotism/corruption group pressure inequality/oppression irrational past orientation HonorShame
  • 61. Cultural Associations lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances nepotism/corruption group pressure inequality/oppression irrational tradition bound HonorShame
  • 62. What happens to our relationships and ministry when we describe others like this? lying/deception bribery unpunctual pharisaism illiteracy sexism ostentation Justice Guilt obligation appearances nepotism/corruption group pressure inequality/oppression irrational tradition bound HonorShame
  • 63. Cultural Associations indirect communication reciprocity/gifting event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting HonorShame hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 64. Cultural Associations indirect communication reciprocity/gifting event orientation purity orality gender roles feasting YOU hospitality face patronage/client group orientation high power distance/hierarchy holistic reasoning past orientation HonorShame
  • 65. Evaluation of HonorShame Cultures (?)Unknown  (+)Positive  (-) Negative But, we can choose the next phase. ? negative EVALUATION positive + Typically, Christian workers‘ affective evaluation of HonorShame cultural values evolves with time. _ TIME (spent in HonorShame cultures) HonorShame
  • 66. Evaluation of HonorShame Cultures (-/-) CRITICAL – A rejection of HonorShame aspects; everything is viewed negatively. +/- ? negative EVALUATION positive + (+/-) BALANCED – A nuanced acceptance of honor and shame as both good and bad, as revealed in scripture. _ -/ TIME (spent in HonorShame cultures) HonorShame
  • 67. Summary of Culture Section • • • • • Guilt vrs. Shame Shame, guilt, and fear Meaning of honor and shame Sources of honor and shame Cultural associations & personal evaluation HonorShame
  • 68. SCRIPTURE What does the Bible teach about Honor and Shame? HonorShame
  • 69. Two models of salvation Timothy Laniak proposes two models of salvation for interpreting biblical narratives: •guilt-innocence •shame-honor HonorShame
  • 70. Guilt-Innocence Salvation innocence transgression guilt HonorShame
  • 71. Guilt-Innocence Salvation forgiveness innocence transgression guilt HonorShame
  • 72. Shame-Honor Salvation status threat shame HonorShame
  • 73. Shame-Honor Salvation honor status threat shame HonorShame
  • 74. Shame-Honor Salvation: The example of Ruth William Blake, 1795 HonorShame
  • 75. Shame-Honor Salvation: The example of Ruth HONOR redemption, husband, son, land restored, line of David STATUS married, w/ 2 sons THREAT widowed in Moab SHAME no descendant or land, cut off from Israel HonorShame
  • 76. Shame-Honor Salvation People who God saved from the threat of shame to higher-than-before position of honor: • Adam (Gen 1-2) • Abraham (Gen 12:1-3) • Isaac • Jacob • Leah • Joseph (Gen 37-41) • Moses (Ex 2-4) • Nation of Israel (Deut 6-7) • Hannah (1 Sam 2) • David (1 Sam 17; 2 Sam 7) • Mephibosheth (2 Sam 9) • Ruth • Esther, Mordecai, and Jews (Esther) • Job (Job 1, 2, 42) • Daniel and friends ( Dan 1-6) • Cornelius (Acts 10) • Jesus (Phil 2, Rev 5) HonorShame
  • 77. Salvation in the Gospels Carl Bloch, 1871 HonorShame
  • 78. Salvation in the Gospels Jesus’ ministry saved people from shame and blessed them with honor. Via association with Jesus, sinners could gain a news status as God’s special people. • Jesus’ healings saved people from social stigmatization, as well as physical ailments. 60 MINUTES: ―Mercy Ships‘ Doctors Heal Shame‖ (3 min video). WATCH NOW! • Jesus’ table fellowship with outcasts conferred honor upon them, which threatened the falsely honored Pharisees. • Jesus’ teachings overturns cultural notions of honor, and replaces them with God‘s code of honor. HonorShame
  • 79. Metaphors of Salvation A primary way NT authors communicate salvation is through metaphors. Metaphors use ideas from ordinary life to communicate how God transposes believer‘s spiritual status from shame to honor. Can you think of 3 metaphors/images of status reversal in the Bible? (The next slide has 30!) HonorShame
  • 80. Click here for hi-res jpeg HonorShame
  • 81. OT Verses on HonorShame Joel 2:26-27 And my people shall never again be put to shame. You shall know that I am in the midst of Israel, and that I, the Lord, am your God and there is no other. And my people shall never again be put to shame. 1 Samuel 2:30 The Lord declares: ‗Far be it from me; for those who honor me I will honor, and those who despise me shall be treated with contempt.‘ Isaiah 54:4 Do not fear, for you will not be ashamed; do not be discouraged, for you will not suffer disgrace; for you will forget the shame of your youth, and the disgrace of your widowhood you will remember no more. Psalm 62:7 My salvation and my honor depend on God; he is my mighty rock, my refuge. HonorShame
  • 82. NT Verses on HonorShame John 12:42-43 Nevertheless many, even of the authorities, believed in him (Jesusu). But because of the Pharisees they did not confess it, for fear that they would be put out of the synagogue; for they loved human glory more than the glory that comes from God. Romans 10:11-12 The scripture says, ―No one who believes in him will be put to shame.‖ For there is no distinction between Jew and Greek; the same Lord is Lord of all and is generous to all who call on him. Philippians 2:5-11 (Jesus) emptied himself, taking the form of a slave, being born in human likeness. And being found in human form, he humbled himself and became obedient to the point of death— even death on a cross. Therefore God also highly exalted him and gave him the name that is above every name. 1 Peter 2:6-10 …whoever believes in him (Jesus) will not be put to shame, but honor to those who believe; …. But you are a chosen race, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, God‘s own people, in order that you may proclaim the mighty acts of him who called you out of darkness into his marvelous light. Once you were not a people, but now you are God‘s people; HonorShame
  • 83. SIN & SHAME: The Theological Connection 1. sin = shame Sin dishonors God and devalues His name. For example, David‘s murder of Uriah ―utterly scorned the LORD.‖ Sin shames. 2. sin  shame Upon sinning, we feel sentiments of shame and disgrace before God and others. Humans feel unworthy and disconnected, so seek to hide. Sin creates shame. 3. sin  shame When a person feels shame, they resort to sinful tactics to cover their shame or restore their honor (i.e., violence, abuse, suicide). Shame produces more sin. HonorShame
  • 84. Summary of Scripture Section • • • • • • Two models of salvation Shame-Honor salvation Salvation in the Gospels Metaphors of Salvation OT & NT verses on HonorShame Sin & Shame HonorShame
  • 85. RELATIONSHIPS How can does HonorShame inform our relationship? HonorShame
  • 86. INTRODUCTION As we understand HonorShame dynamics, we must consider their role in our relationships and ministry. How can we build better, more honoring, relationships with people from an HonorShame culture? These will not ensure ministry ‗success‘, but help you avoid unnecessary friction and frustration. HonorShame
  • 87. #1 – Banish Shame All people deal with shame, including Western Christians. Shame is not a uniquely Asian or Arab issue, but a human issue. We must seek God‘s salvation for our own shame, before helping others. Even ministry can be a source of shame (i.e., Moses, Ex 4) or badge false honor (i.e., Saul of Tarsus persecuting). How do you struggle with shame? What do you hide from people? Why do you feel unworthy before God? HonorShame
  • 88. #1 – Banish Shame To better understand the forces of shame in American culture, WATCH: ―Listening to Shame‖ - a TED talk by Brene Brown, secular shame researcher. If time is limited, start at 13:00. HonorShame
  • 89. #2 – Give Gifts Gifts are a primary way to secure relationships and confer status. HonorShame cultures are structured around reciprocity – everybody shares and gifts with one another. By giving gifts, you can get in the game and build relationships. Gifts indicate respect and thankfulness to those who have helped you. HonorShame
  • 90. #3 – Know Roles HonorShame cultures tend to be hierarchical. (This rubs egalitarian Westerners who insist everyone be treated fairly.) People are expected to play different social roles, based on gender, age, ethnicity, and position. So, understand what role others expect you to play, and play the part appropriately. This means dressing, relating, eating, and communicating accordingly. Know your place, play your expected role. HonorShame
  • 91. #4 – Don’t Expose If you unnecessarily expose a person‘s shame or weakness, they will feel like you are rubbing their nose in the poop to teach them a lesson. So, instead of demanding a verbal apology, maybe symbolize your forgiveness by inviting that person to a meal. When there is sin to address, try to address the issue without exposing the person. Consider the relational impact of your approach, and limit exposure. When people sense shame, they naturally become resistant and avoid the relationship. HonorShame
  • 92. #5 – Be Clean People make snap evaluations of your value, based on your appearance and mannerisms. So if you disregard unspoken purity rules, then people may disregard your message as unworthy. I once heard a Muslims dismiss the Christian message, simply because ―Christians don‘t clean their shoes.‖ Western culture focuses on public cleanliness, but Eastern cultures focus on personal purity. HonorShame
  • 93. Summary 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Banish Shame Give Gifts Know Roles Don‘t Expose Be Clean HonorShame
  • 94. MINISTRY How can we minister honor to the shamed? HonorShame
  • 95. Evangelism Evangelism in HonorShame contexts means presenting how Jesus removes shame and restores honor? For an example, watch this 4-minutes whiteboard cartoon, ―Back to God‘s Village.‖ HonorShame
  • 96. Evangelism Consideration of honor and shame dynamics also helps contextualize the methods (not just content) of evangelism. • The genre of our message can cohere with the oral and relational aspects of HonorShame cultures. • We should consider the collectivism of HonorShame cultures, perhaps sharing with heads of families and being open to group conversions. • Males typically seek to project honor; females typically want to hide shame. Gender roles are an important consideration in presenting. • Instead of viewing CP as ―evangelism  discipleship  community‖, consider the strategy of ―community  discipleship  evangelism.‖ HonorShame
  • 97. Discipleship Discipleship is ―helping believers understand and adopt God‘s honor of code‖, as 1 Peter models. In 1 Peter, the Christian community was shamed and pressured to conform to social conventions. So Peter reminds them of the honor they already possess as members of God‘s family and followers of the humanly shamed but divinely honored Lord Jesus Christ. Possessing an eternal honor from God, Christians may ignore the threat of social shame and act in a way God deems honorable. HonorShame
  • 98. Discipleship 1 Peter 2:11-12 (the letter‘s thesis statement) could be paraphrased: To those cherished and honored by God, I urge you as marginalized and scorned social outcasts to refrain from cultural mechanisms to fashion your own reputation (because that actually demeans your worth before God). Rather, make sure your behavior among the pagans is honorable in God’s sight. So, even though they scorn you as ‘criminals’ and spoil your reputation, eventually they will see your truly honorable behavior and honor God when he returns to publically declare who is honorable and shameful for eternity. Marriage, offense, persecution, and leadership are key areas where God and culture define honor differently. 1 Peter presents an alternative ethic for acquiring honor in these areas. HonorShame
  • 99. Discipleship: Marriage Cultural Honor Code Divine Honor code How do false views of honor affect marriage? In God‘s eyes, honoring your spouse is honorable. Singleness indicates limited value and shame, so singles bear downward pressure to marry. Marriage is an alliance between families to expand connections. Marriage is not about personal happiness or love, but maintaining and enhancing your family‘s reputation. ―Husbands, in the same way, show consideration for your wives in your life together, paying honor to the woman.‖ (3:7) Regarding singleness, see Isaiah 54:4-5. In marriage, men are expected to show dominance and control. There is social pressure to beat a bride to display one‘s manliness, especially before others. HonorShame
  • 100. Discipleship: Offense Cultural Honor Code Divine Honor code Offense, unforgiveness, rivalries, and grudges are byproducts of a pursuit of cultural honor. In God‘s eyes, bearing insults People can be offended over slight insults, such as an improper greeting or invitation. Feeling disgraced, people resort to physical aggression, or maintain polite appearances while harboring and bitterness until their face is restored. ―Christ suffered for you, leaving you an example, that you should follow in his steps…When they hurled their insults at him, he did not retaliate; when he suffered, he made no threats. Instead, he entrusted himself to him who judges justly.‖ (2:21-23) ―A murder may be forgiven, but an affront never.‖ – Chinese proverb. patiently is honorable. In HonorShame cultures, people rarely apologize and ask for forgiveness, because that is a sign of weakness. HonorShame
  • 101. Discipleship: Persecution Cultural Honor Code Persecution intends to devalue, shame, and exclude. For example, Roman crucifixion purposefully inflicted victims with tremendous ridicule and public humiliation. The flesh‘s natural response is to resist with physical force, or passively adopt prevailing norms to avoid public attention. The social shame of physical persecution is to be avoided. Christians in HonorShame contexts may hide their faith to not bring shame upon their parents, or avoid community scandals. Divine Honor code In God‘s eyes, bearing sufferings like Christ is a badge of honor. ―But rejoice inasmuch as you participate in the sufferings of Christ, so that you may be overjoyed when his glory is revealed. If you are insulted because of the name of Christ, you are blessed…If you suffer as a Christian, do not be ashamed, but praise God that you bear that name.‖ (4:13-16) HonorShame
  • 102. Discipleship: Leadership Cultural Honor Code Power is often exploited for family gain. For politicians, the country become a family businesswhere the golden goose is squeezed to get all the eggs out. The authority of leadership roles is leveraged to acquire resources, project strength, and demand resect. On a smaller scale (i.e., in a family, business, or church), society expects leaders to exercise strong control through unilateral decision making or public scoldings. As long as leaders provide for followers, it is assumed they will use their leadership position for personal/family gain. Divine Honor code In God‘s eyes, honorable leadership serves others. Be shepherds of God‘s flock that is under your care …not pursuing dishonest gain, but eager to serve; not lording it over those entrusted to you, but being examples to the flock. And when the Chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the crown of glory that will never fade away. (5:1-4, cf. Mk 10:42-44) HonorShame
  • 103. Discipleship: Summary The antidote to false, cultural honor is not no honor, but eternal, unfading honor. In the Bible, honor itself is not dismissed as bad; God never discredits honor. Rather, God invites people to accept the honor he gives, and to live according to that eternal honor in all areas of life. Where as the Gospels explain how Christ made available shamefree/honorable status for people, the NT epistles help believers embody that new honor. HonorShame themes lie at the forefront of Romans, 2 Corinthians, Hebrews, 1 Peter, and Revelation. HonorShame
  • 104. HONORIFICATION Honorification is an approach to Christian mission specifically for HonorShame contexts. Understanding the centrality of honor and shame in both contemporary cultures and the Bible, honorification contextualizes Christian witness for HonorShame contexts by blessing the shame in all missional activities. HonorShame
  • 105. HONORIFICATION •Honorification is a theological paradigm for interpreting Jesus‘ earthly ministry – in his life, death, and resurrection, he honored the shamed. •Honorification is a missiological strategy that continues God‘s mission of redeeming people from shame and restoring human dignity. •Honorification is a legitimate end of Christian mission, as we help people obtain their eternal honor in Christ through faith. •Honorification a strategic means of Christian mission that informs our churchplanting, professional activities, and relationships. •Honorification arises from the convergence of human longings and divine interests– both people and God are concerned about human honor. HonorShame
  • 106. HONORIFCATION For an inspiring example of honorification, watch this mini-documentary about handicapped modeling for manikins– ―BECAUSE WHO IS PERFECT?‖ HonorShame
  • 107. HONORIFICATION In your relationships and lifestyle, how can you continue the ministry of Jesus by infusing honor to the shamed, though both word and deed? HonorShame
  • 108. MINISTRY: Summary 1. Evangelism – content and means 2. Discipleship – model of 1 Peter 3. Honorification HonorShame
  • 109. CONCLUSION HonorShame
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  • 112. Conclusion Interested in even more? Awesome! Contact info@HonorShame.com It would be an honor to serve you. Thanks. HonorShame
  • 113. HonorShame