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  • 1. Full Race “Strip Bars” Traction Bars Applications: 88-91 Civic (EF) 90-93 Integra (DA) 92-93 GS-R (DB) 92-95 Civic (EG) 96-00 Civic (EK) 99-00 Civic Si (EM-1) 94-01 Integra (DC) 93-97 Civic Del Sol While very few traction bars are compatible with the 99-00 civic Si (EM-1) lower control arm mounts, Full Race traction bars ARE compatible with these cars (please specify when ordering!!) How Full Race Traction Bars Work to Improve Traction Under acceleration, deceleration or turning, the soft stock bushings (and even polyurethane bushings) will allow the arm to move back and forth as the force from the tire and car compress and “squish” the bushing into different shapes. The soft bushings allow for a smooth ride, but the downside of this soft ride is low precision and low accuracy of the suspension components. This movement, known as “deflection” of the Lower Control Arm (LCA) and Upper Control Arm (UCA), allows the wheel to shift forwards, backwards, up, down, in and out of the geometrically intended location simply due to the fact that the stock Honda suspension was not designed to handle the forces introduced from a high power/high speed vehicle. Because of this movement in the bushings, the alignment settings of the car become useless, and the wheel actually moves forwards into the fender well (on high power cars, the tire actually hits the bumper cover). As the suspension geometry and alignment move around, the car toes out, and caster changes erratically. The available traction of the vehicle decreases as overall traction is reduced and either complete loss of traction aka wheelspin or wheelhop is the result. The concept of the traction bar is very simple. If the suspension does not have any inaccurate or sloppy movement (due to bushing flex) the suspension geometry does not change. If the car is a high power car with stock bushings, the LCA, UCA, and spindle will all move in paths that are not the desired geometrical suspension path. This is because the high power car places much more force on the bushings then they are designed for, and the flex and movement will actually cause toe out (or toe in on the rebound) and strange caster paths, not the linear caster path you want. With traction bars there is no deflection. Bushings can not flex/move/change with the solid-mounted heim joint and radius arm. In fact, if you were to simply replace all your bushings with solid spherical bushings, they would work just as well as a traction bar, but would make for a very harsh ride. Traction bars greatly improve a vehicle’s launching, turning, braking and high speed stability.
  • 2. Are All Traction Bars Created Equal? When choosing a traction bar, there are many variables to take into consideration. The single most important consideration is the design of the traction bar. The important elements of traction bar design are: 1) Geometry 2) Strength of Design (Factor of Safety) 3) Materials used - completely fabricated from MIL-T6736B 4130 Cromoly, welded with the ASME specified process. And radius rods are cnc machine 6061 t6 4) Quality of Design 1. Geometry When referring to suspension geometry, most car enthusiasts can not look at a traction bar and visually see the difference between a traction bar with the wrong geometry, as compared to one that is properly designed. If the design does not use the correct geometry, the car will toe-out, get erratic caster paths, and the bushings actually tear from simply hitting bumps. All of these problems are due to the binding of the suspension components. The traction bar, if designed wrong, will quite literally tear the suspension apart from the binding of the radius arms. Binding is when two solidly attached (no flexible bushing) arms, which rotate about different axes, try to rotate together. Because they do rotate about two different axes they will either not move at all (unless the metal bends), or in the case of a Honda with soft bushings, stretch/tear the bushing.
  • 3. The following images show a traction bar kit which does not utilize the correct suspension geometry. As the wheel goes up and down, the suspension cycles, and the radius rod tries to tear the bushing and bend the metal subframe, crossmember, lower control arms and frame rails. The bushing in this lower control arm shows the result of using incorrect suspension geometry in a traction bar. As one can clearly see, there is a severe tear all the way around the bushing.
  • 4. Full Race Strip bars are designed to not bind. The radius rod follows the exact arc of the lower control arm, forcing the suspension to follow its true arc. No binding will occur, only increased traction and accurate suspension travel. 2. Strength of Design Full Race prides itself on engineering excellence. As a result, we have performed complete stress calculations and Finite Element Analysis simulations on every brand of traction bar on the market as well as other designs we that have not even been created. The latest EF and DA crossmember design looks nothing like any other competitor’s product, and in fact it is actually similar to the EG/ EK/DC bars with a few very important design elements. When a component is properly engineered, using actual math and engineering principles, by actual engineers, there is a number called the "Factor Of Safety." This number is developed using a stress calculation technique called “Von Mises criterion” (there are many ways to do it, but Von Mises is generally accepted to be the most thorough/accurate). Von Mises tells us exactly how strong a design is, and how much it will bend from the forces that are placed on it. Using this engineering technique, and solidworks/cosmos FEA (finite element analysis), we have actually designed a simpler, lighter, stronger, stiffer, space saving crossmember that retains full functionality, is competitively priced and is 5 times stronger than the next (twice as heavy) competitor.
  • 5. By solving equations with the largest possible force as your force variable, it makes your factor of safety the smallest it can be, to ensure that you do not have a design that can break. A good design encompasses all the ideas of rigidity, low flex, moment cancellations and effectively cancels out the forces that the control arms place on the crossmember. By using these design elements, the structure cancels out the forces and the result is an extremely stiff/strong crossmember that works effectively. Full Race’s design actually has less tubes than most of the other companies, but the design is such that a fewer number of tubes placed in precise locations results in a stiffer/stronger member. Design 1 This is the most common crossmember design. This design uses two parallel tubes with an H beam connecting the two tubes. The end plates are 3/16” steel and the material used for simulation purposes is 1.25” 0.095 thick chrome-moly tube. Most manufacturers of this style crossmember do not use 4130 chrome moly, rather DOM mild steel, which lowers the factor of safety and makes it weaker. -Static Nodal Stress Plot – 1500 lbs per radius arm / no load from motor mount -2 Bar Style- 3/16” plate, 1.25 x 0.095 Chrome-moly Deformation Scale – 33.35 Factor of Safety – 1.13 The FEA analysis shows the maximum sustainable stress load to be 33.35 times the input load of 1500. This means it only takes 33 times the force to deform the member this much:
  • 6. Design 2) This is the second most common crossmember design. This design uses one maintube which has (2) bent arms welded to it. The radius arms mount to the bent arms. The end plates are 3/16” steel and the material used for simulation purposes is 1.50” 0.095 thick cromoly tube. -Static Nodal Stress Plot – 1500 lbs per radius arm / no load from motor mount -2 Bar Style- 3/16” plate, 1.50 x 0.095 Chrom-moly FOS – 2.18 This is the most common crossmember design. This design uses two parallel tubes with an H beam connecting the two tubes. The end plates are 3/16” and the material used for simulation purposes is 1.25” 0.095 thick cromoly tube. Most manufacturers of this style crossmember do not use 4130 Chrome Moly, rather DOM mild steel, which lowers the factor of safety and makes it weaker. -Static Nodal Stress Plot – 1500 lbs per radius arm / no load from motor mount -2 Bar Style- 3/16” plate, 1.25 x 0.095 Chrom-moly Deformation Scale – 33.35 Factor of Safety – 1.13
  • 7. This is the most common crossmember design. This design uses two parallel tubes with an H beam connecting the two tubes. The end plates are 3/16” and the material used for simulation purposes is 1.25” 0.095 thick cromoly tube. Most manufacturers of this style crossmember do not use 4130 Chrome Moly, rather DOM mild steel, which lowers the factor of safety and makes it weaker. -Static Nodal Stress Plot – 1500 lbs per radius arm / no load from motor mount -2 Bar Style- 3/16” plate, 1.25 x 0.095 Chrom-moly Deformation Scale – 103.69 Factor of Safety – 2.18 Static Nodal Stress Plot – 1500 lbs per radius arm
  • 8. Full-Race Motorsports Style- 3/16” plate, 1.50 x 0.083 and 1.50 x 0.095 Chrom-moly FOS – 5.11 Deformation Scale – 330.61
  • 9. Quality of Design --The connection points will be different in two ways, both at the crossmember and at the LCA. At the LCA we will mount to the LCA bolt next to the shock fork on all vehicles except for the 99-00 civics. These vehicles do not have the bolt on the LCA, so they must use the shock fork as the attachment point. The advantages to using the LCA as athe attachment point are 1) you do not need to take the radius arm off when you need to change an axle 2) it is a rigid point, not a sloppy bushing at the base of a shock fork. mounting the radius arm here is not nearly as accurate as mounting it on the LCA itself, which is why we still recommend that Si useres switch LCAs, however it is *not* necessary, just recommended and the crossmember mounts are on the identical axis ( x, y and z axes actually) as the axis of LCA rotation. this will ensure that there is absolutely no binding and the LCA follows the path it was intended to follow jimfabs cant easily keep a 3” downpipe with Wheelhop and loss of traction result from a combination of problems. More than likely you had some extremely stiff sidewalls (a z rated street tire), worn motor mounts, worn shocks or a variety of other possible problems. While the correct suspension geometry can only help your problem, it will more than likely not solve everything. You need to use a high quality tire with a forgiving sidewall, and be sure to use a motor mount that is somewhat stiffer than stock. While the correct suspension geometry can only help your problem, it will more than likely not solve everything. You need to use a high quality tire with a forgiving sidewall, and be sure to use a motor mount that is somewhat stiffer than stock.
  • 10. How well do these traction bars work on the street, will these tractions bars affect the ride of the car? Its my daily driver so roads aren't smooth all the time. ? The difference is very noticeable. the difference is night and day. After driving my civic every day for the past 6 months, i pulled the motor out to redo a bunch of stuff and have been driving my close friend's integra The integra does not have traction bars, the civic does. The integra is turbo so it does make power and i can really feel the front end slop, its unreal but the difference is huge. I am probably going to put my bars on the integra so it stops bugging me every time i driv Some customers have asked us if our selling point was that the StripBars retain perfect geometry, wouldn't attaching the radius arm to a different location on the lower control arm change that geometry? Quite simply, the answer is no. The geometry is independent of LCA mounting location. Whether you mount the bar to the shock fork or directly to the LCA, you will keep the correct geometry. The geometry is dictated by the Full Race crossmember, not the LCA mount. Will these traction bars be streetable? Absolutely. These bars are intended to give you full streetability and reliability while greatly improving the performance of the vehicle on and off the street/strip. i noticed that the length of the traction bars increased/decreased the caster of the car. So when i "dial-in" my traction bars do i want to adjust them based on the stock caster settings or do i want them +/- those settings? that is crorect, the shorter you make the bars, the more they pull the LCA forwards. You can use this to bring a honda into perfect alignment, as there is no caster adjustment from the factory. i am really interested in buying these traction bars btu i dont want to buy them if i dont know how to adjust them properly... i keep seeing people say that if you dont adjust them you will bend and break stuff. well i dont want that to happen to me. how would i learn how to adjust them? its very simple, take the car to any alignment shop, and they will adjust the bars for you. just set the car to factory specs and the radius rods hold the LCA in place preventing any movement from that point on. Will the traction bars I bought from full race for my 94 civic fit on a 93-95 del sol? The traction bars for the 92-00 Civics, 94-01 Integras and 93-97 Del Sol are all compatible with one another.
  • 11. The rod ends Left and Right hand threaded so you can shorten or lengthen it without unbolting the arm from the car. Simply unlock the locknuts, adjust the bar to choice, and retighten the locknut. How do I attach the car to the dyno if there are no tow hooks? I did have a question about these thou, in the picture it looks like you only have the bars attached on the lower controll arm at one point... Do you see a problem with that at all over time?? I mean is it gona hold up... I have a set of jimfabs right now and they have a whole bracket that ataches to the lower arm.. What makes your setup better in fuction than Jimfab? You said somthing about better stablity, but can you please explain. Someone also said that the install and adjustment should be easier than with yours than the Jimfab?.... if true, then how so? the full race setup allows you to adjust the rod length without removing the rod from the lower control arm, unlike jimfab. there is also much more room for headers/downpipe. stability will not be a factor, being that this piece is made of thick cromoly and tig welded at every spot needed. i dont know about install being easier than jimfab, ive never installed one before. its most likely the same considering your taking something off, and putting something in its place. it is stronger to place it farther out like us. The jimfab bars have the arm coming off at a point farther from the outer lower control arm ball joint, thus reducing the torque that the radius arm places on the LCA. The farther out, the greater the torque. just think of a seesaw, with a little kid on the long end, and a fat guy on the pivot point. The downside to following this is that the farthes point is at the shock fork, which allows a slop location due to the shock bushing. If you use the LCA bolt as the mount there is no flex, no slop just direct and accurate LCA control even on the CRX application? thats what i meant, sorry for not being more clear. yes. the crx bars will have twice as much room for header/downpipe, and theyre made to be adjusted without having to take out the radius rod. tons easier. If I buy these bars, is it still a good idea to get poly motor mount inserts? the two clevices go on the lower control arm. use a gold washer on the outside of each side of the clevice (nut and bolt) use the aluminum washers to space the heim joint inside of the clevice. the same goes for the radius rod to the actual strip bar mounting points. this is a direct bolt on. if
  • 12. anyone has questions about installation please let me know. also, you re-use the lower control arm nuts and tow hook bolts. full lock pic, here it is. the tire size is 195/60/14, standard offset. looks like it has about 3" of clearance. JON V customer -- the adjustment is really easy. Throw it up on a jack (I did mine 1 side at a time, no jack stands ) only took 10 min, two wrenches and a couple of turns and your done. I've had mine on for three days and i have adjusted it twice. i think i got it where I want it now, so i am going to go get my alignment done It made a huge differnce in the way my car handles, I adjusted it to make the radius bars longer and it seems like it is right in the middle of where it was when i first put them on and befor they were on. When I first installed them I had them all the way "shortened" I guess would be the right word. to preload the radius bars, do i shorten or extend it? you will want to pull the lower control arm towards the front bumper, effectively shortening the length of the radius arm (screwing the heims in, not out) FULL-RACE GEOFF - will these traction bars clear aftermarket oil pans (like moroso). particularly the bars for an EG... The bars are powdercoated, which, unlike paint is not porous and will not rust.