Tackling Reviews - The good, the bad, and the ugly

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It is important to have a game plan for responding (or not responding) to all types of online reviews - good, bad, and ugly.

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Tackling Reviews - The good, the bad, and the ugly

  1. 1. Page 10 . For more ideas on how to market your business, visit connect.homes.com. tackling reviews: The Good, the bad, and the ugly They say it’s always “the squeaky wheel that gets the grease” Well, the same is true for customers who complain and leave not-so-nice reviews and one and a half star ratings on your business profile. It’s the bad and ugly ones that get the attention and require your quick and carefully-worded responses. We’d all love to respond to the good ones—the pleasant and glowing reviews about how wonderful their experience was with your brand, but truthfully, we’re typically on the lookout for the bad and ugly ones so we can quickly pounce on them and put those fires out stat. Here’s a real-life example of a “bad” review (complete with photo), turned “ugly” (i.e. widespread news coverage and lawsuits). You may recall SUBWAY® ’s sandwich scandal in which their famous sub fell short at 11 inches 6 . The entire uproar began, and then went viral, on SUBWAY® ’s Facebook page when a customer complained on their page by posting a photo of the sub next to a measuring tape confirming that the sandwich fell an inch short of its namesake (“bad”). SUBWAY® initially responded that the name wasn’t intended to be a “measurement of length.” However, when three customers subsequently named SUBWAY® in a lawsuit (“ugly”), they changed their stance and stated, “Our commitment remains steadfast to ensure that every SUBWAY® FootlongTM sandwich is 12 inches at each location worldwide” (“good”). Sources: 6 Los Angeles Times 2013 Tackling Reviews: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly How SUBWAY® ’s FootlongTM Turned Their Online Footprint to ‘Footwrong’
  2. 2. Page 11 . For more ideas on how to market your business, visit connect.homes.com. tackling reviews: The Good, the bad, and the ugly Hubspot reported that 58% of consumers trust a business with positive online reviews, 65% read between two and ten reviews and that a large number of reviews gave users more confidence in the legitimacy of the star ratings 7 . With so many consumers relying on strangers’ ratings and comments about a brand, you really need a game plan for responding (or not responding) to such content. Lessons Learned: 1. Word travels a million miles an hour online – especially when a disgruntled customer posts negative content about your brand. 2. Respond quickly and consistently to avoid the “snowball effect” (and law suits and media scrutiny, etc.). 3. Name your products appropriately to avoid “false claims.” SUBWAY® customers were relatively disappointed as was evidenced by the subsequent number of photos of subs and measuring tapes that were posted to SUBWAY® ’s Facebook Page. This real-life scenario illustrates the importance of monitoring customer sentiment, addressing matters in a timely manner and with a consistent message. Being mindful of these tips will elicit good customer experiences and reviews and minimize those bad and ugly encounters. Sources: 7 Local Consumer Review Survey 2012

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