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Our political beginnings
Our political beginnings
Our political beginnings
Our political beginnings
Our political beginnings
Our political beginnings
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Our political beginnings

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  • 1. Our Political Beginnings American Government Chapter 2 Section 1
  • 2. Basic Concepts of Government <ul><li>Ordered Government </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Orderly regulation such as sheriffs, coroners, grand jury, township, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Limited Government </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Government is restricted and each individual has certain rights that government cannot take away. </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. Basic Concepts Continued <ul><li>Representative Government </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Government should serve the will of the people. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People should have a voice in deciding what government should and should not do. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ government of, by, and for the people” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This idea was becoming popular in England at the time!!! </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. Landmark English Documents <ul><li>Magna Carta </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1215-King John forced to sign-included trial by jury, due process, and other protections against the absolute power of the King. (Robin Hood?!) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Petition of Right </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Further limited the Kings Powers (Charles I) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The Bill of Rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Glorious Revolution-limited army in peace time, free elections, fair trial, etc. </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. English Colonies <ul><li>Royal Colonies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Subject to control of the Crown </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Created a bicameral (2 house) legislature controlled by the King. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Proprietary Colonies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Organized by a proprietor, a person to whom the king had made a grant of land. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pennsylvania had a unicameral (1 house) legislature. </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. English Colonies Continued <ul><li>Charter Colonies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connecticut and Rhode Island were based on charters granted to the colonists. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mostly self-governing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Laws made by bicameral legislatures were not subject to the governor&apos;s veto, nor was the Crown needed for approval! </li></ul></ul>

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