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Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame
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Today's Advertising Paradigm is Broken...and Everyone's to Blame

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The Mad Men era is gone. Modern times requires a complete shift in the way that advertising is thought of and delivered. Agencies and advertisers need to keep up with what technology has to offer and …

The Mad Men era is gone. Modern times requires a complete shift in the way that advertising is thought of and delivered. Agencies and advertisers need to keep up with what technology has to offer and how it's changing the way advertising gets done.

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  • 1. TODAY'S ADVERTISING PARADIGM IS BROKEN... AND EVERYONE'S TO BLAME By Hollis Thomases, 12/11/13
  • 2. ADVERTISING USED TO BE… Mad Men image source: http://blog.wordnik.com/word-soup-mad-men
  • 3. …WHICH MEANT Singular, big creative ideas  The Creative Director was God  It was all about branding and generating an emotional reaction  Ad agencies stuck to paid media and advertising vehicles were finite and standardized (mainly print, radio, TV)  Media commissions were fat (~15-20% of media spend)  Agency teams revolved around client brand 
  • 4. NOW ADVERTISING IS…
  • 5. FEW “ADVERTISING” AGENCIES ARE EVEN STRICTLY PROVIDING ADVERTISING…     Some are doing only one thing – like brand concepting and creative develop or media planning and buying – really well… And outsourcing or partnering to do “the other stuff” While the rest are really acting more like marketing agencies, offering whatever kinds of services it takes to make it appear as though they have competency in everything to satisfy their clients Too many silos exist (strategy, creative, traditional, digital, mobile, search, etc.)  As a result, agency compensation models are thrown asunder, and it’s hard for companies to compare apples to apples during an agency review process SO SHOULD ADVERTISERS BE HIRING “AD AGENCIES” OR MARKETING AGENCIES??
  • 6. SPEAKING OF ADVERTISING CLIENTS…
  • 7. ADVERTISERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROBLEM 1. 2. 3. 4. CMOs come and go, sometimes even before the agency term is up They have internal silos of their own Smart ad/marketing decisions can be stymied by corporate politics They want to piecemeal out work as projects but expect all involved players to play nice in the sandbox
  • 8. ADVERTISERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROBLEM 5. KPIs and other benchmark metrics of successful marketing aren’t often pre-defined
  • 9. ADVERTISERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROBLEM 6. 7. There is a tendency to be swayed by bright shiny objects (e.g. Pinterest, Vine, Groupon, etc), even if they don’t serve the business objective The ad/marketing landscape is crowded and cluttered, and hard and getting ever more difficult to understand
  • 10. ADVERTISERS CONTRIBUTE TO THE PROBLEM 8. 9. Digital ad/marketing technology can be intimidating It’s easier to default to “experts” than to be one...but are they too easily abdicating the allocation and performance of their ad/marketing dollars?
  • 11. SPEAKING OF DIGITAL…
  • 12. AD/MARKETING TECH IN THE PROBLEM MIX Built by technologists trying to solve problems but…  Technologists don’t often speak the same language of ad/marketing people    Benefits get lost in translation Start-up technologies may use too much of their funding on building and not enough on educating the market on the value of their product  Are they even pitching to the right decision-makers?
  • 13. AD/MARKETING TECH IN THE PROBLEM MIX    New technologies often face long adoption curves, so much so that their value may be obsolete by the time the market catches up…and the tech may be out of cash to adapt and change by then Utilizing, implementing and updating new ad/marketing tech requires expenses clients and agencies might not have budgeted for, and therefore the tech might just get passed over Clients AND Agencies may be missing out on great tools to help them reach, acquire, process and retain new customers THE ENTIRE AD PARADIGM NEEDS TO SHIFT TO ACCOMMODATE TODAY’S PACE OF CHANGE!
  • 14. HOLLIS THOMASES – CLIENT DIGITAL ADVOCATE In 1998, multi-time award-winning entrepreneur Hollis Thomases founded Maryland-based Web Ad.vantage, providing strategic digital marketing and advertising solutions. In 2013, Hollis became a sole practitioner focused on marketing advocacy – ensuring clients were educated and aware of the pitfalls and missed opportunities that the digital marketplace can provide. In January 2010, Hollis authored the book, “Twitter Marketing: An Hour a Day,” by John Wiley & Sons, and has been a columnist with Inc.com, Social Media Marketing Magazine, and ClickZ. Hollis also frequently speaks at industry conferences and association events. Hollis Thomases graduated from Cornell University with a BA in Social Relations. You can find her in the Twittersphere @hollisthomases, on LinkedIn, by email or by old-fashioned phone: +011-484-679-6364.

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