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Giving Credit Where Credit is Due
Todd Bloom, Ph.D.
Chief Academic Officer
Hobsons
November 12, 2013
Welcome & Overview
Introductions
The demand for credit earned through
nontraditional courses & learning programs
Features ...
Demand for credit earned through
nontraditional courses & learning
programs
Why the demand for alternative
credit?
Increase in number of non-traditional students
Greater student mobility
Trends in s...
Credit Demand: Non-Traditional
Students the Norm
21.6 million
undergrads in U.S.
higher ed today.
National Center for Educ...
Credit Demand: Student Mobility

1
/3

of all students change
institutions at least once
before earning a degree

National...
Credit Demand: Student Mobility
Transfer out rates at 2- and 4-year Title IV institutions:
Cohort years

Public

Private n...
Credit Demand: Student Mobility
Transfer out rates at 2- and 4-year Title IV institutions:
Total

Private not- Private
for...
Credit Demand: Student Mobility
37% transfer in second year (most common
year)
22% transfer as late as fourth or fifth yea...
Credit Demand: Trends in HE
Supply & Demand

10

http://www9.georgetown.edu/grad/gppi/hpi/cew/pd
fs/undereducatedamerican....
Credit Demand: Completion
Agenda
Looking ahead to 2020:
55 million job openings through 2020
- 35% require Bachelor’s+
- 3...
Credit Demand: Completion
Agenda
Percentage of students seeking a bachelor's degree at 4-year degree-granting institutions...
Credit Demand: Completion
Agenda
Percentage of students seeking a certificate or degree at 2-year degree-granting institut...
Credit Demand: Credit Issues for
Students
Extra Credits:
Certificate programs
- Should take 30 credits
- Students take 63....
Credit Demand: Credit Issues for
Students
Extra Time to Credentials:
Certificate programs
- Should take 1 year
- Full-time...
Features of nontraditional credit
programs
Alternative Credit Programs
Types of Programs:
Examinations & Assessments
Portfolios
Online courses
Internships

17
Alternative Credit Programs:
Exams & Assessments
ACE Credit:
American Council on Education
program started in 1974
Helps a...
Alternative Credit Programs:
Exams & Assessments
College Level Examination Program
(CLEP):
College Board program has exist...
Alternative Credit Programs:
Exams & Assessments
DSST:
Started in 1974, offering academic
testing for military service mem...
Alternative Credit Programs:
Exams & Assessments
Uexcel:
Partnership of Excelsior College
and Pearson VUE
Used for earning...
Alternative Credit Programs:
Exams & Assessments
Western Governors University:
Online, competency-based degree
programs
St...
Alternative Credit Programs:
Portfolios
Council for Adult and Experiential
Learning’s LearningCounts.org:
Portfolio develo...
Alternative Credit Programs:
Online Courses

24

Massive Online Open Courses
(MOOCs):
ACE has endorsed some MOOCs for
cred...
Alternative Credit Programs
Internships:
Work experience with a strong
academic component
Opportunity to develop
professio...
Benefits of each program type
Exams & Assessments
Benefits:
Faster time to degree
Lower cost than traditional classes
Credit for objective measure of
kn...
Portfolios
Benefits:
CAEL found that graduation rates
are two and a half times higher for
students with PLA credit
Higher ...
Online Courses
Benefits:
Flexibility (anywhere, anytime)
Potential cost savings
Increase availability of popular
courses
M...
Alternative Credit Programs
Benefits:
Practical application of coursework
Work experience
Building professional networks
C...
Evaluation of options based on
institutional needs & student
outcomes
Alternative credit programs
have challenges…
CONSISTENT, HIGH
STANDARDS

CREDIT TRANSFER

COMPLETION
RATES OF MOOCs

MISSE...
Assessing Alternative Credit
Programs
What do you think?

Please discuss in small groups:
What are the challenges presente...
Assessing Alternative Credit
Programs
What challenges are most important to
address before considering implementation?

Pl...
Assessing Alternative Credit
Programs
Next steps at your institution

Please discuss in small groups:
Looking at the top c...
Assessing Alternative Credit
Programs
Next steps at your institution
Please discuss in small groups:
Summarize your next s...
Thank You!
Todd Bloom
Chief Academic Officer
Hobsons
todd.bloom@hobsons.com
(952) 807-5345
@Todd_bloom
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Giving credit where credit is due

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From CLEP credit to online learning, technology-driven innovation is expanding throughout the education marketplace. Have you considered awarding credit for learning that occurs outside the traditional classroom? This presentation describes and evaluates the latest non-traditional credit-bearing programs, including MOOCs. Learn the features, benefits, and challenges of each program and gain insights for implementing strategies that work for students and institutions.

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  • National Guide to College Credit for Workforce Training: http://www2.acenet.edu/credit/?fuseaction=browse.main
  • Transcript of "Giving credit where credit is due"

    1. 1. Giving Credit Where Credit is Due Todd Bloom, Ph.D. Chief Academic Officer Hobsons November 12, 2013
    2. 2. Welcome & Overview Introductions The demand for credit earned through nontraditional courses & learning programs Features of nontraditional credit programs Benefits of each program type Evaluation of options based on institutional needs and student outcomes 2
    3. 3. Demand for credit earned through nontraditional courses & learning programs
    4. 4. Why the demand for alternative credit? Increase in number of non-traditional students Greater student mobility Trends in supply and demand in higher education Completion agenda Credit issues for students 4
    5. 5. Credit Demand: Non-Traditional Students the Norm 21.6 million undergrads in U.S. higher ed today. National Center for Education Statistics. (2013). Projections of Education Statistics to 2021. Washington DC: National Center for Education Statistics. 38% enroll part-time National Center for Education Statistics. (2013). Projections of Education Statistics to 2021. Washington DC: National Center for Education Statistics. 5 20% work full-time U.S. Census Bureau. (2012). School Enrollment and Work Status: 2011. Washington, DC: Census Bureau. 38% graduate from 4 year institutions in 4 years National Center for Education Statistics. (2012). Digest of Education Statistics 2011. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics.
    6. 6. Credit Demand: Student Mobility 1 /3 of all students change institutions at least once before earning a degree National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. (2012). Transfer & Mobility: A National View of Pre-Degree Student Movement in Postsecondary Institutions. Herndon, VA: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. 6
    7. 7. Credit Demand: Student Mobility Transfer out rates at 2- and 4-year Title IV institutions: Cohort years Public Private notfor-profit Private forprofit 2003 & 2006 10.3% 13.9% 4.6% 0.7% 2002 & 2005 11.1% 14.6% 4.8% 0.9% 2001 & 2004 10.9% 14.7% 4.7% 0.6% 2000 & 2003 10.4% 14.1% 4.4% 0.9% 1999 & 2002 7 Total 10.0% 13.4% 4.2% 1.5% IPEDS data
    8. 8. Credit Demand: Student Mobility Transfer out rates at 2- and 4-year Title IV institutions: Total Private not- Private for-profit for-profit 4-yr institutions (cohort yr 2003) 8.4% 11.3% 4.5% 1.0% 2-yr institutions (cohort yr 2006) 13.4% 17.6% 9.1% 0.6% Men – total (cohort years 11.0% 2003 & 2006) 14.3% 5.1% 0.8% Women – total (cohort years 2003 & 2006) 8 Public 13.6% 4.2% 0.7% 9.7% IPEDS data
    9. 9. Credit Demand: Student Mobility 37% transfer in second year (most common year) 22% transfer as late as fourth or fifth years 27% transfer to different state 43% transfer into a public two-year college (most popular destination) National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. (2012). Transfer & Mobility: A National View of Pre-Degree Student Movement in Postsecondary Institutions. Herndon, VA: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. 9
    10. 10. Credit Demand: Trends in HE Supply & Demand 10 http://www9.georgetown.edu/grad/gppi/hpi/cew/pd fs/undereducatedamerican.pdf
    11. 11. Credit Demand: Completion Agenda Looking ahead to 2020: 55 million job openings through 2020 - 35% require Bachelor’s+ - 30% require some college – Associate’s - 36% require no HE Occupations most in demand (all require HE): - STEM - Healthcare professions - Healthcare support - Community services http://cew.georgetown.edu/recovery2020/ 11
    12. 12. Credit Demand: Completion Agenda Percentage of students seeking a bachelor's degree at 4-year degree-granting institutions who completed a bachelor's degree within 6 years: Starting cohort year 2005 80% 70% 60% 50% Total 40% Males Females 30% 20% 10% 0% All Institutions 12 Public Private Nonprofit Private For-Profit http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cva.asp
    13. 13. Credit Demand: Completion Agenda Percentage of students seeking a certificate or degree at 2-year degree-granting institutions who completed a credential within 150 percent of the normal time required to do so: Starting cohort year 2008 70% 60% 50% 40% Total Males Females 30% 20% 10% 0% All Institutions 13 Public Private Nonprofit Private ForProfit http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cva.asp
    14. 14. Credit Demand: Credit Issues for Students Extra Credits: Certificate programs - Should take 30 credits - Students take 63.5 credits Associate programs - Should take 60 credits - Students take 79 credits Bachelor’s programs - Should take 120 credits - Students take 136.5 credits 14 Complete College America. (2011). Time is the Enemy. Washington DC: Complete College America. Retrieved from http://www.completecollege.org/docs/Time_Is_the_Enemy.pdf.
    15. 15. Credit Demand: Credit Issues for Students Extra Time to Credentials: Certificate programs - Should take 1 year - Full-time students take 3.3 years; Part-time 4.4 years Associate programs - Should take 2 years - Full-time students take 3.8 years; Part-time 5 years Bachelor’s programs - Should take 4 years - Full-time students take 4.7 years; Part-time 5.6 years 15 Complete College America. (2011). Time is the Enemy. Washington DC: Complete College America. Retrieved from http://www.completecollege.org/docs/Time_Is_the_Enemy.pdf.
    16. 16. Features of nontraditional credit programs
    17. 17. Alternative Credit Programs Types of Programs: Examinations & Assessments Portfolios Online courses Internships 17
    18. 18. Alternative Credit Programs: Exams & Assessments ACE Credit: American Council on Education program started in 1974 Helps adults receive academic credit for courses and exams taken outside traditional degree program Seeks to create partnerships between higher education institution and employers/training providers http://www.acenet.edu/news-room/Pages/College-Credit-Recommendation-Service-CREDIT.aspx 18
    19. 19. Alternative Credit Programs: Exams & Assessments College Level Examination Program (CLEP): College Board program has existed 40+ years Tests students’ mastery of collegelevel material Taken by working adults, traditional students currently enrolled, members of the military, etc. $80 per exam 19 https://clep.collegeboard.org/
    20. 20. Alternative Credit Programs: Exams & Assessments DSST: Started in 1974, offering academic testing for military service members Expanded in 2006 to include anyone wanting to earn college credit outside the traditional classroom Includes upper- and lower-level courses $80 per exam http://getcollegecredit.com/ 20
    21. 21. Alternative Credit Programs: Exams & Assessments Uexcel: Partnership of Excelsior College and Pearson VUE Used for earning college credit, advanced placement, and for professional licensure/certification $95 per exam http://www2.acenet.edu/credit/?fuseaction=browse.getOrganizationDetail&FICE=1006302 21
    22. 22. Alternative Credit Programs: Exams & Assessments Western Governors University: Online, competency-based degree programs Students progress through assessments as they master the content (in class, prior learning/work experience, or self-study) Students pay for time (flat 6 month rate) rather than credit hours http://www.wgu.edu/why_WGU/competency_based_approach 22
    23. 23. Alternative Credit Programs: Portfolios Council for Adult and Experiential Learning’s LearningCounts.org: Portfolio development and assessment Brings together all forms of prior learning assessment and determines best path to degree Portfolio assessment up to 12 credits is $250 http://www.learningcounts.org/ 23
    24. 24. Alternative Credit Programs: Online Courses 24 Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs): ACE has endorsed some MOOCs for credit Students use MOOCs to prepare for CLEP and other exams to earn credits inexpensively MOOC2Degree institutions use free credit as recruitment tool—students who complete the course and enroll in the university receive credit
    25. 25. Alternative Credit Programs Internships: Work experience with a strong academic component Opportunity to develop professional network According to best practices, coordinated closely at campus and at work site 25
    26. 26. Benefits of each program type
    27. 27. Exams & Assessments Benefits: Faster time to degree Lower cost than traditional classes Credit for objective measure of knowledge and ability to apply it http://www.americanprogress.org/issues/highereducation/news/2012/06/08/11725/the-opportunities-and-challenges-ofcompetency-based-education/ 27
    28. 28. Portfolios Benefits: CAEL found that graduation rates are two and a half times higher for students with PLA credit Higher persistence rates Faster time to degree completion Cost savings http://www.cael.org/pla.htm 28
    29. 29. Online Courses Benefits: Flexibility (anywhere, anytime) Potential cost savings Increase availability of popular courses MOOCs in particular… - Test out particular subject or idea of 29 college without financial commitment Potential to support developmental education
    30. 30. Alternative Credit Programs Benefits: Practical application of coursework Work experience Building professional networks Create partnerships between higher ed institution and businesses 30
    31. 31. Evaluation of options based on institutional needs & student outcomes
    32. 32. Alternative credit programs have challenges… CONSISTENT, HIGH STANDARDS CREDIT TRANSFER COMPLETION RATES OF MOOCs MISSED CLASSROOM EXPERIENCES …and many more depending on the student and institution 32
    33. 33. Assessing Alternative Credit Programs What do you think? Please discuss in small groups: What are the challenges presented by these programs? Consider Institutional mission and priorities Student academic experience Student outcomes Measures of quality Return on investment 33
    34. 34. Assessing Alternative Credit Programs What challenges are most important to address before considering implementation? Please discuss in small groups: Prioritize the challenges, identifying the top three to report back to the whole group. 34
    35. 35. Assessing Alternative Credit Programs Next steps at your institution Please discuss in small groups: Looking at the top challenges you identified, what are next steps your institution should take in evaluating/implementing alternative credit? Consider Policies Practices Stakeholder interests 35
    36. 36. Assessing Alternative Credit Programs Next steps at your institution Please discuss in small groups: Summarize your next steps and report back to the whole group. 36
    37. 37. Thank You! Todd Bloom Chief Academic Officer Hobsons todd.bloom@hobsons.com (952) 807-5345 @Todd_bloom
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