Bridges to Nowhere - How Institutions Assume Responsibility for their Graduates

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Todd Bloom, chief academic officer at Hobsons, provides best practices schools and post-secondary institutions can implement in bridge programs to ease the transition for students between high school and college and beyond.

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Bridges to Nowhere - How Institutions Assume Responsibility for their Graduates

  1. 1. Bridges to Nowhere?How Institutions Assume Responsibility for TheirGraduatesTodd Bloom, Ph.D.Chief Academic Officer, HobsonsMay 31, 2013
  2. 2. Education pipeline overviewK-12 to postsecondary transitionPostsecondary completionPromising practices for bridge programs2Agenda
  3. 3. Education Pipeline
  4. 4. Key Transitions:High school graduationCollege enrollmentCollege persistenceCollege completionWorkforce entry4U.S. Education Pipelinehttp://www.higheredinfo.org/analyses/Pipeline%20Article.pdf
  5. 5. 5U.S. Education Pipelinehttp://www.changemag.org/Archives/ BackIssues/2011/May-June2011/first-in-the-world-full.html
  6. 6. High School to PostsecondaryTransition
  7. 7. ―Summer melt‖ – new HSgraduates who intend to enroll incollege the following fall have theirplans change.Current research shows that thenumber of students affected is 8 –40%, with low-income studentsespecially vulnerable.7K-12 to HE Bridgehttp://scholar.harvard.edu/files/bencastleman/files/castleman_and_page_-_trickle_or_torrent_ssq_final_manuscript_-_02-06-13.pdf
  8. 8. 8K-12 to HE Bridgehttp://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cpa.aspPercentage of high school completers who were enrolled in 2- or 4-year colleges by theOctober immediately following high school completion, by family income: 1975-2011
  9. 9. 9K-12 to HE Bridgehttp://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/figures/figure-trc-2.asp
  10. 10. 10K-12 to HE Bridgehttp://www.nacacnet.org/research/research-data/nacac-research/Documents/PreparingStudents.pdfNational Association for College Admission Counseling report:
  11. 11. Bridge Program Examples:Postsecondary options in high school- Dual Enrollment- Early CollegeTRIO Programs- Talent Search- Upward Bound- GEAR UPBridge programs at individual postsecondaryinstitutions11K-12 to HE Bridge
  12. 12. National Center for Postsecondary Researchevaluation of 8 Texas bridge programsNo effect on number of college credits earnedIncrease in completion of first college-level mathand writing coursesImpact not significant in second yearNo significant impact on persistence12K-12 to HE Bridgehttp://www.postsecondaryresearch.org/i/a/document/NCPR-BridgingtheGapBrief.pdf
  13. 13. New America Foundation recommends longerterm, structural changesDevelop clear standards for students to progressto next levelRequire individual learning plansCreate strong P-20 partnershipsRefocus college readiness to early interventionReplicate successful intervention that is built intocurriculum and is part of school year13K-12 to HE Bridgehttp://www.onlinethinktank.com/documents/BridgingGap.pdf
  14. 14. Postsecondary Completion
  15. 15. 15Postsecondary Completion0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%All Institutions Public Private Nonprofit Private For-ProfitTotalMalesFemalesPercentage of students seeking a bachelors degree at 4-year degree-granting institutionswho completed a bachelors degree within 6 years: Starting cohort year 2005http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cva.asp
  16. 16. 16Postsecondary CompletionPercentage of students seeking a certificate or degree at 2-year degree-granting institutionswho completed a credential within 150 percent of the normal time required to do so: Startingcohort year 2008http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/indicator_cva.asp0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%All Institutions Public PrivateNonprofitPrivate For-ProfitTotalMalesFemales
  17. 17. of all students changeinstitutions at least oncebefore earning a degree17Postsecondary Completion1/3National Student Clearinghouse Research Center. (2012). Transfer & Mobility: A National View of Pre-Degree StudentMovement in Postsecondary Institutions. Herndon, VA: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.
  18. 18. 37% transfer in second year (most commonyear)22% transfer as late as fourth or fifth years27% transfer to different state43% transfer into a public two-year college(most popular destination)18Postsecondary CompletionNational Student Clearinghouse Research Center. (2012). Transfer & Mobility: A National View of Pre-Degree StudentMovement in Postsecondary Institutions. Herndon, VA: National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.
  19. 19. “The growing emphasis on holding institutions accountablefor student success has, to some extent, reinforced thetraditional reporting paradigm in which the institutionis the unit of analysis and students are viewed assimply entering, progressing linearly, and completinga degree — or not. . . The analyses in this report suggestthat a new view may prove useful, in which students arethe unit of analysis and institutions are viewed as steppingstones along a diverse set of educational paths.”19Postsecondary CompletionNational Student Clearinghouse Research Center. (2012). Transfer & Mobility: A National View of Pre-Degree Student Movement in Postsecondary Institutions. Herndon, VA: National Student Clearinghouse ResearchCenter.
  20. 20. National Student Clearinghouse Research Center(2012). Completing College: A National View ofStudent Attainment RatesThe following slides look at six-year outcomes ofdegree-seeking students who enteredpostsecondary education for the first time in fall2006.20Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdf
  21. 21. 21Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes (All Institutions) by Enrollment Intensity
  22. 22. 22Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes (All Institutions) by Age at First Entry andEnrollment Intensity
  23. 23. 23Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes by Starting Institution Type
  24. 24. National Student Clearinghouse report:Documents large population of students whodrop-out or stop-outShows that significant number ofnontraditional, mobile students not completingdegrees24Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdf
  25. 25. National Student Clearinghouse report:Looking beyond starting institution raisesoverall 6 yr. completion rate from 42% to 54%- Every student subgroup and type of institution seescompletion increaseMobile students are using multiple institutionsto reach educational goals25Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdf
  26. 26. Intervention and retention strategies:Stop out recovery programs- Target students who stopped out with a majority ofcredits completeWeekend or Evening College- Flexible schedulesBlended learning- Combine strengths of online and face-to-faceinstruction26Postsecondary Completion
  27. 27. Best Practices for EducationTransitions
  28. 28. Focus on student successStart earlyConnect college to student’s interests andmotivationPrepare students for academic and socialtransitionsInform students about college costs and ways topayPartner with higher ed to provide continuoussupport28K-12 Best Practiceshttp://www.tgslc.org/pdf/files-sfts_what_works.pdf
  29. 29. Serves low-income, underrepresented college-bound students from Los Angeles Unified highschoolsFocuses on writing, grammar, and languageskillsDevelops tools for successful transition tocollegehttp://www.uscrossier.org/pullias/research/projects/summertime/29University of Southern California’sSummerTIME Program
  30. 30. Students write college-level argumentative paperWriter’s workshop format teaches how to giveand receive criticismStudents present paper to instructors and peersProgram includes sessions to develop strategiesand skills for college success30University of Southern California’sSummerTIME Program
  31. 31. Uses 8 parameters of successful interventionprograms:MotivationSubstanceIndependenceMultiple approaches31University of Southern California’sSummerTIME ProgramCenter for Higher Education PolicyAnalysis. SummerTIME 2007 Evaluation.High standardsInquiryProblem solvingSupportive context
  32. 32. 86% of students improve their Test of WrittenLanguage, Third Edition scoresAverage score increase is 1.6 grade level84% of students received a B or higher for thecourse (rubric aligned with first year collegelevel)90% of students said class was “meaningful”32University of Southern California’sSummerTIME ProgramCenter for Higher Education PolicyAnalysis. SummerTIME 2007 Evaluation.
  33. 33. Focus on student successReturning nontraditional students:- Have longer hours for administrative services- Set aside space for meetings and socializing- Integrate nontraditional students into campuscommunity- Provide services that support balancing differentdemands (e.g. work and family)33Higher Ed Promising Practiceshttp://www4.aacrao.org/semsource/sem/index0790.html?fa=view&id=5292
  34. 34. Focus on students who have stopped outSupport services:- Financial aid- Re-registration- Review of academic standingFree tutoringCareer coachingPersonalized career planOnline liberal studies degree programhttp://www.montana.edu/success/returntolearn/34Montana State University“Return to Learn”
  35. 35. Information for adults going to college for firsttime or who have stopped outProject Graduate targets returning students whohave 80+ credit hours, including incentives:- Free application- Tuition assistance- Priority enrollment- Individual advisinghttp://www.knowhow2goky.org/35“Knowhow2goKY”
  36. 36. In small groups, create a “best in class” bridgeprogram for K-12 or higher ed- Target Market: Which students are served?- What program characteristics are most important?- How should the program be evaluated?- What are measures of success?Report back to larger group36Activity
  37. 37. Todd BloomChief Academic OfficerHobsonstbloom@hobsons.com(952) 807-5345@Todd_Bloom37Thank you!
  38. 38. 38Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes for Students Who Started at Four-Year PublicInstitutions by Age at First Entry and Enrollment Intensity
  39. 39. 39Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes and First Completion for Students Who Startedat Two-Year Public Institutions by Age at First Entry andEnrollment Intensity
  40. 40. 40Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes for Students Who Started atFour-Year Private Nonprofit Institutions by Age at First Entry andEnrollment Intensity
  41. 41. 41Postsecondary Completionhttp://www.studentclearinghouse.info/signature/4/NSC_Signature_Report_4.pdfSix-Year Outcomes for Students Who Started atFour-Year Private For-Profit Institutions by Age at First Entry andEnrollment Intensity

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