Sedition 2008

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Sedition 2008

  1. 1. FAREWELL Please remember… .. The U.S. after George Washington
  2. 2. The United States of America
  3. 4. ELECTION of 1796                              The Constitution in 1796 required presidential electors to place the names of two individuals on their ballots; the candidate with the highest vote count, if a majority, became the president and the runner up the vice president. The results were not anticipated by anyone. Adams won with 71 electoral votes, but was followed by Thomas Jefferson with 68 votes; Thomas Pinckney trailed the leaders with 59. The president was a Federalist, but the vice president was the leader of the Democratic Republicans opposition – an untidy situation.
  4. 5. Sectionalism                             
  5. 6. Northern votes for Adams Southern votes for Jefferson “ Sectionalism”
  6. 7. President John Adams leader of the Federalist Party Vice President Thomas Jefferson leader of the Democratic Republicans
  7. 8. United States 1796-1800 Liberty Order
  8. 9. President John Adams XYZ Affair Undeclared war with France Domestic Issues Alien Acts Sedition Acts Virgina Resolution Kentucky Resoultion
  9. 10. To counter a growing “threat” against government, the Federalists pushed four measure known as the Alien and Sedition Acts through Congress in 1798. THE ALIEN and SEDITION ACTS                             
  10. 11. American citizenship requirements raised from 5 –14 years; jail time or fines for anyone expressing opinions damaging to the government; President could deport violators TARGETED : Foreigners (immigrants, French and British radicals), and members of the Democratic – Republicans RESULTS: Federal government prosecuted and jailed Republican editors, publishers, and politicians Alien and Sedition Acts 1798 Espionage and Sedition Acts 1917 A person could be fined up to $10,000/20 years in prison if they interfered with the draft, obstructed the sale of bonds, or saying anything profane, disloyal, or abusive about the war effort RESULTS: 6,000 arrests for loosely defined anti-war activities (1,500 convictions) House of Reps refused to seat a Socialists Congressman critical of the war Supreme Court hears Schenck v. U.S case in 1917 The Alien Registration Act of 1940 (Smith Act) The act, which made it an offense to advocate or belong to a group that advocated the violent overthrow of the government. was the basis of later prosecutions of members of the Communist and Socialist Workers parties. WAR TIME CONSTITUIONAL ISSUES                             
  11. 12. Patriotism and Political Opposition The Patriot Act 2004 P roviding A ppropriate T ools R equired to I ntercept and O bstruct T errorism                             
  12. 13. Checks and Balances
  13. 14. ? Executive Judicial Legislative
  14. 15. Under the threat of war with France, Congress in 1798 passed four laws in an effort to strengthen the Federal government. Known collectively as the Alien and Sedition Acts , the legislation sponsored by the Federalists was also intended to quell any political opposition from the Republicans, led by Thomas Jefferson.
  15. 16. Kentucky Resolution Virginia Resolution
  16. 17. The Virginia Resolution The Kentucky Resolution Claimed the right to declare null and void the alien and Sedition acts because it violated the bill of rights. Claimed the right to declare null and void federal laws going beyond the powers granted by the Constitution to the Federal government
  17. 18. Federalism What if states ignore a Federal law?                                                  
  18. 19. A FAMILIAR THEME: States Rights In 1798 to counter a growing “threat” against government, the Federalists pushed four measure known as the Alien and Sedition Acts through Congress. The Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions Claimed the right to declare null and void federal laws going beyond the powers granted by the Constitution to the Federal government In 1828: Congress passes Tariff of Abominations $45.00 tax on imports. Southern Congressmen claim the Tariff favors the manufacturing North John C.Calhoun issues the South Carolina Exposition declaring Tariff of 1832 “null and void”                             

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