Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Creatividad
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Creatividad

603

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
603
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
13
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Some Informing Statements This lecture is informed by a number of thoughts and ideas: That’s one of them (SLIDE)…here are some others…. 1. We like the idea of creativity but we don't really understand it. 2. A lot of what we like to think is 'creative'…. isn't. 3. Creativity isn't a form of white (or black) magic, but is something real and tangible that we can understand and, through understanding it…we can enahnce our own creativity.
  • Defining Creativity There are many aspects to creativity, and it has been explored by a number of theoretical approaches including philosophy, psychology and sociology. From an examination of some recent research reviews of creativity - both generally and in relation specifically to educational and organisational development (Dust 1999, King and Anderson 1995) - it is clear that there is no one definition of creativity that can be agreed upon. Also, not surprisingly, given the problems defining it, the measurement or assessment of creativity also poses many problems. That creativity exists and is a necessary and important part of human activity is generally recognised. It is neither the exclusive preserve of the genius, nor is it limited to specific fields and levels of work. Also creativity is not just a 'quality': it manifests itself at a number of points, and it informs and is part of a process which leads to an outcome. The time dimension of creativity is very important, as it emerges often after a period of mundane, hard, even repetitious work. Sapp 1992 is one of many researchers who point out that time is essential for creativity to flourish and for creative products to be produced. Creativity researchers, mostly from the field of psychology, usually claim that being creative means being novel and appropriate. Subsumed under the appropriateness criterion are qualities of fitness, utility, and value. Without the criterion of appropriateness (i.e. a recognition by others of its fitness/utility/value), novelty can be merely bizarre. Therefore, one way of defining creativity is as playing with the way things are interrelated and demonstrating the ability to generate novel and useful ideas and solutions to everyday problems and challenges . For example George de Mestral noticed how thistle burrs stuck to his trousers on a walk in the woods, and went on to invent Velcro. James Dyson noticed the centrifugal effects of cyclonic air and invented the highly successful bagless vacuum cleaner. Another definition of creativity is the action of combining previously uncombined elements . Gutenberg, for example, created the printing press by combining a winepress with a die-punch. This combining of items which previously were separate is part of the nature of being creative and can be discerned at all levels of activity:- from the eminent to the everyday.
  • Whatever the disagreements about definitions, most researchers are in agreement that the essentials for high-level creativity are: motivation knowledge opportunity creative teaching style encouragement to be creative acceptance of one's own personality the courage to be different (Freeman 1998).
  • THE 4P's There are three aspects of creativity which have drawn much attention: the person, the process, and the product. Barron (1988) defined creativity as 'a creative product produced by a creative person as a result of a creative process' .
  • However the organisational climate and culture and environment plays such a vital role - particularly in education - that it deserves recognition. Therefore Barron's statement could be re-formulated as follows: 'a creative person engaged in a creative process within a creative environment producing a creative product'.
  • Whatsoever the collection of characteristics a creative person possesses, according to Amabile's (1983) influential model of creativity, the creative act itself is critically dependent on the following three components working in combination: Skills in creative thinking Finding the problem (essential); choosing and using divergent and convergent reasoning ; understanding the nature of the problem and understanding the appropriateness (or not) of the approach, the ideas generated and the outcome. Is it appropriate? Does it work? Is it of utility? Can it be done? Skills in the task domain Knowledge of the area of the task; relevant technical skills; special talents etc. Intrinsic Motivation Amabile's 'Intrinsic Motivation Hypothesis' which states that people will perform more creatively if they are motivated by interest in the activity itself: intrinsic motivation rather than by the promise of rewards or threats of punishments extrinsic motivation. All three components of Amabile's model need to be present. For example an eminent creative thinker in one field e.g. physics, might lack the task-domain skills in a different area e.g. drawing, and therefore would fail to perform creatively notwithstanding high levels of skills in creative thinking and intrinsic motivation.
  • The Creative Person There has been much research into the characteristics of creative people. A list of the most commonly described characteristics (see Table 1 below) reveals that they are a mixture of attributes and personality traits, 'givens' and things that are acquired. However, whilst they provide a good baseline against which to consider the creative individual, they are not easily measurable. Also the consequences of some of them e.g. unconventionality, challenging authority, originality etc. clearly have the potential to pose challenges to any organisational system that is based on those Classical standbys of order, structure, rules, harmony etc.etc.
  • However, whilst they provide a good baseline against which to consider the creative individual, they are not easily measurable. Also the consequences of some of them e.g. unconventionality, challenging authority, originality etc. clearly have the potential to pose challenges to any organisational system that is based on those Classical standbys of order, structure, rules, harmony etc.etc.
  • The Creative Process The creative process receives the most attention by far of writers and researchers. Most of the work focuses on the mechanisms and phases involved as one partakes in a creative act. As with the actual definition of creativity, there is a wide and divergent range of opinion. This has led to the development of dozens, if not hundreds of models of the creative process. However, many are adaptations, variations and developments of the influential four-stage model of the creative process developed in 1926 by Graham Wallas: 1.Preparation 2.Incubation 3.Illumination 4.Verification In the preparation stage, the problem or challenge is defined; any data or resources the solution or response needs to account for is gathered; and criteria for verifying the solution's acceptability are set up. In the incubation stage, we step back from the problem and let our minds contemplate and work it through. Like preparation, incubation can last minutes, weeks, even years. In the illumination stage, ideas arise from the mind to provide the basis of a creative response. These ideas can be pieces of the whole or the whole itself, i.e. seeing the entire concept or entity all at once. Unlike the other stages, illumination is often very brief, involving a tremendous rush of insights within a few minutes or hours. In verification , the final stage, one carries out activities to demonstrate whether or not what emerged in illumination satisfies the need and the criteria defined in the preparation stage.
  • Based on Plsek’s Directed Creativity Cycle
  • Several clear themes emerge from the various models of the creative process:- that the total creative process involves purposeful analysis, imaginative idea generation, and critical evaluation. that the total creative process is a balance of imagination and analysis, divergent and convergent thinking, that the total creative process requires a drive to action and the implementation of ideas. The act of imagining new things must be combined with the ability to make them concrete realities.
  • The creative environment A great deal of creativity research concentrates on the '3P's': people, process and product. However, the organisational climate and culture deserves some attention of its own. Unless one is working in, or is able to create a climate and culture that is conducive for innovation, (which includes democratic and participatory structures; openness to change and challenge; encouragement of risk taking; a playful approach to new ideas; and a tolerance of vigorous debate) then one is on a hiding to nothing. According to Amabile (1983) the following enhance organisational creativity: Freedom (especially operational autonomy) Good project management Sufficient resources A climate that prizes innovation (and allows for failure) Pressure (within limits)
  • Whilst the following act as inhibitors or blocks to organisational activity Evaluation Constraint Formal rules Respect for traditional ways of doing things Indifference Competition Time Pressure (when too high) Amabile makes the point that many of the organisational factors considered to be inhibitors of creativity operate by restricting people's freedom to work in the way that best suits them.
  • The creative product The criteria or characteristics of creative products are of particular importance because it is the basis of any performance assessment of real world creativity and may provide a window on the other aspects of creativity. Of course the creative product - whether it be an actual, physical object or an expressed idea - is the proof or evidence that creativity has occurred. And because it is a product and therefore tangible - is also the easiest element to assess. We use product-based assessment in selection and recruitment - portfolios of work, audition tapes, recent papers, full list of publications etc.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Ejercita tu mente y tu creatividad, resolviendo las siguientes actividades deinicio. ¡¡¡Que no se coman las frutas!!! En esta plantación frutal, los pájaros revolotean queriendo comer la fruta. Evitemos eso, enjaulándolos. Ayúda a separar los pájaros de las frutas, utilizando tres líneas rectas.
    • 2. SOLUCION
    • 3. Vendo Casa con JardínEn este predio, se venderán cada una de las casas, con dos árboles en su jardín.¿Cómo se puede dividir el terreno en partes y formas iguales, para que cada comprador adquiera su casa, con la misma superficie de jardín y dos árboles?
    • 4. SOLUCION
    • 5. SOLUCION
    • 6. ¿Qué es la creatividad? Creatividad esLa capacidad Para generar Soluciones Originales y novedosas Ver lo que Pensar lo que Hacer lo que todos ven nadie más ha nadie se ha pensado atrevido a hacer
    • 7. Imaginación Desarrollo deConocimiento Creatividad nuevas ideas Libertad de pensamiento “La persona CREATIVA siente curiosidad por conocerlo todo”
    • 8. PENSAMIENTO PENSAMIENTO LINEAL LATERALCONVERGENTE DIVERGENTE
    • 9. PENSAMIENTO PENSAMIENTO LINEAL LATERALSe mueve solo si hay Se mueve para crearuna dirección en que nuevas direccionesmoverseSe basa en la secuencia Puede efectuar saltosde ideasCada paso ha de ser No es preciso que lo seacorrectoSe usa la negación para No se rechaza ningúnbloquear bifurcaciones y caminodesviaciones
    • 10. PENSAMIENTO PENSAMIENTO LINEAL LATERALSe excluye lo que no Se explora incluso lo queparece relacionado con parece completamenteel tema ajeno al temaLas categorías, No lo sonclasificaciones yetiquetas son fijasSigue los caminos más Sigue los caminos menosevidentes evidentesEs un proceso finito Es infinito
    • 11. Solución De Problemas
    • 12. Cuestión que se trata de aclarar Es algo que seDesacuerdo interpone en el entre el “camino”entre la realidadpensamiento actual de una personay los hechos y lo que desea Problema Situación que es Desacuerdo nueva para el entre los individuo a quien se le pide resolverla hechos
    • 13. Miedo Espera pasiva Actitudes mágicasAudaci a Aporta Proceso n Psicológico ciencia Eternasdeliberaciones Aportan experincia Decisión
    • 14. Trabas Mentales• Esta es la respuesta correcta• Eso no es lógico• Siga las instrucciones al pie de la letra• Sea práctico• Evite la ambigüedad• Equivocarse es vergonzoso• Juguetear es mera frivolidad• Esa no es mi especialidad• No quiero hacer el ridiculo• No tengo creatividad
    • 15. Reto a la creatividad• El proceso del descubrimiento de puede aprender y reproducir a voluntad• El proceso del descibrimiento es análogo en todas las disciplinas• El descubrimiento se hace desde el inconsciente• Es necesario liberar el espiritú de sus inhibiciones para llegar hasta el inconciente
    • 16. • El descubrimiento supone un clima de esparcimiento y de placer• Los descubrimientos no necesariamente son realizados por expertos• El inrteres por lo estraordinario favorece el descubrimiento• El descubrimiento nace de la bisociación• El grupo multidisciplinariosuele ser la mejor unidad operativa de investigación
    • 17. MITOS Y REALIDADES MITOS REALIDAD• La creatividad no existe mas • Todo ser humano dispone de que en los genios una cuota de creatividad potencial (genética) al nacer, que se puede desarrollarr a partir del entorno cultural • Cualquier ser humano puede• La creatividad no puede ser aprender a innovar por enseñada desarrollo sistemático de su creatividad potencial• La creatividad se desarrolla • Es necesario cultivar la por sí sola en un ambiente creatividad, capacitándose estimulante adecuadamente• La creatividad es • La creatividad es una forma de independiente de la inteligencia inteligencia
    • 18. MITOS Y REALIDADESMITO REALIDAD• La creatividad de ideas • La creatividad se nutre de emitidas lleva a la calidad la experiencia. en ideas innovadoras• La creatividad necesita • La verdadera creatividad solamente la frescura es científica, disciplinada intuitiva de la inocencia y sistemática• La verdadera creatividad • La calidad de la es artística, bohemia y creatividad potencial, rebelde adecuadamente cultivada, lleva a la calidad en ideas innovadoras •  
    • 19. ¿CÓMO DESARROLLAR LA CRATIVIDAD?• Interaccionando con personas o entornos creativos. Proponiéndose retos creativos y sobre todo practicando. Te puedes ayudar de las técnicas o estrategias de trabajo creativo.
    • 20. FASES DE LA CREATIVIDAD1. Fase de preparación, en la que se recoge la información relacionada con el problema.2. Fase de incubación.3. Inmersión4. Fase de inspiración o iluminación.
    • 21. FASE DE PREPARACIÓN• Estamos habituados a nuestra manera mundana de pensar soluciones. Los psicólogos denominan “fijación funcional” a la trampa de la rutina; solo vemos la manera obvia de solucionar un problema, la misma manera cómoda en que lo pensamos siempre• Otra barrera que impide absorber información nueva es la autocensura, esa crítica voz interior que confina nuestro espíritu creativo dentro de los límites de lo que juzgamos aceptable
    • 22. FASE DE INCUBACIÓN• Una vez que has reflexionado acerca de todas las piezas relevantes y empujado hasta el límite tu mente racional, puedes dejar que el problema se digiera lentamente• Mientras que la preparación exige un trabajo activo, la incubación es más pasiva, es un estado en el que gran parte de lo que sucede se desarrolla fuera de la conciencia enfocada, en el inconsciente• A menudo subestimamos el poder del inconsciente, pero éste es mucho más fértil para las iluminaciones creativas que el consciente• Otra fortaleza del inconsciente radica en que es el almacén de todo lo que sabes y conoces, incluidas informaciones que no puedes evocar rápidamente al nivel consciente  
    • 23. FASE DE INMERSIÓN• Durante todo el día la mente está ocupada, controlada: en la escuela, el parque, el trabajo, viendo televisión. Escapar de todo eso es realmente importante• Cualquier momento en que podamos soñar despiertos y relajados es útil para el proceso creativo (una ducha, un largo trayecto en coche, una caminata en silencio), permitir, simplemente, que la mente sueñe despierta  
    • 24. FASE DE ILUMINACIÓN• Después de la inmersión y el soñar despierto puede llegarse a la iluminación, cuando de repente se te ocurre la respuesta como salida de la nada. Ésta es la etapa que se lleva toda la gloria y la atención. Es el momento que la gente anhela y ansía, aquél en que exclamamos: ¡Eureka!• El pensamiento solo, aunque sea todo un hallazgo revelador, todavía no es un acto creativo. La etapa final es la traducción de la idea y en acción. Traducir la iluminación en realidad convierte la gran idea en algo más que un simple pensamiento pasajero; la idea se vuelve útil
    • 25. TÉCNICAS DE CREATIVIDAD• MAPAS MENTALES• EL ARTE DE PREGUNTAR• BRAINSTORMING• SCAMPER• LISTADO DE ATRIBUTOS• CREAR EN SUEÑOS• SEIS SOMBREROS PARA PENSAR
    • 26. MAPAS MENTALES• Técnica gráfica
    • 27. EL ARTE DE PREGUNTAR• Exploración mediante preguntas
    • 28. BRAINSTORMING• Lluvia de ideas
    • 29. SCAMPER• S :¿SUSTITUIR?• C : ¿COMBINAR?• A : ¿ADAPTAR?• M : ¿MODIFICAR?• P : ¿ UTILIZAR?• E : ¿ELIMINAR O REDUCIR?• R : ¿REORDENAR?
    • 30. LISTADO DE ATRIBUTOS• ACTUAL Y EL FUTURO
    • 31. CREAR EN SUEÑOS• INCONSIENTE
    • 32. SEIS SOMBREROS PARA PENSAR1. BLANCO2. ROJO3. NEGRO7. AMARILLO9. VERDE6. AZUL
    • 33. CONCLUSIÓN• Podríamos decir que desde el punto de vista de las inteligencias múltiples también podemos hablar de creatividades. Las personas más creativas no lo son en todos los campos, si no que lo son en unos determinados. Sí considero que los creativos en un ámbito también tienen una inteligencia destacada en ese mismo ámbito.
    • 34. • Albert Einstein dijo “La imaginación es más importante que el conocimiento”, y luego agrego “formular preguntas y posibilidades nuevas, ver problemas antiguos desde un ángulo nuevo, requiere imaginación creativa y es lo que identifica el verdadero avance en la ciencia”.
    • 35. RESUELVE CREATIVAMENTE La cadena A un herrero le trajeron 5 trozos de cadena, de tres eslabones cada uno, y le encargaron que los uniera formando una cadena continua. ¿Será posible efectuar este trabajo abriendo y enlazando un número menor de anillos y cuanto costaría dicho trabajo si por cada acción que haga le pagan 5 soles?.a) S/. 15 b) S/. 20 c) S/. 30 d) S/. 40
    • 36. SOLUCION
    • 37. Con cuatro de las siguientes cinco piezas se puede armar un cuadradoperfecto. Indica qué pieza no se debe utilizar.a) A b) B c) C d) D e) E
    • 38. SOLUCION 8 4 5 4+5+8+8=25 C B 7 8 A E
    • 39. Los dados misteriosos David, Gustavo y Felix tienen un dado cada uno. Estos tres dados son idénticos en tamaño y color. Cada una de las caras de los dados tiene un color diferente. Al lanzar cada uno su dado sobre la mesa, ellos señalan los colores de las tres caras que ven en su respectivo dado:David : Azul, blanco, amarillo.Gustavo : Anaranjado, azul, rojo.Félix : Verde, anaranjado, blanco.¿Cuál es el color de la cara opuesta a la de colorblanco?a) Verde b) Rojo c) Anaranjado d) Azul
    • 40. SOLUCION ROJO AZUL ILLO AMARANARANJADO BLANCO VERDE
    • 41. BIBLIOGRAFÍA• http://homepage.mac.com/penagoscorzo/ens• http://www.gestiopolis.com/dirgp/emp/i nnovacion.htm
    • 42. OTRAS DIAPOSITIVAS SOBRE CREATIVIDAD CRP-2-Creatividad 45
    • 43. CreatividadCreatividad y Resolución de problemas
    • 44. Vamos a ver... CRP-2-Creatividad 47
    • 45. ¿qué es la creatividad?• Creatividad – Facultad de crear – Capacidad de creación.• Crear – Producir algo de la nada • “Un programa para jugar con el ordenador” – Establecer, fundar, introducir por primera vez una cosa, hacerla nacer o darle vida en sentido figurado. • Crear una industria, un genero literario, un sistema filosófico, un orden político, necesidades, derechos, abusos. – Instituir un nuevo empleo o dignidad. • Se creo un puesto de informático » Diccionario RAE CRP-2-Creatividad 48
    • 46. Características de la gente creativa• Las personas creativas suelen ser rebeldes, revoltosos.• Con frecuencia son los supervivientes de un trauma llamado educación CRP-2-Creatividad 49
    • 47. Creatividad: hacia una definición• La habilidad de tomar objetos existentes y combinarlos de formas distintas con nuevos propósitos.• La habilidad de generar nuevas ideas y soluciones, útiles en los problemas y retos cotidianos. CRP-2-Creatividad 50
    • 48. Necesidades de la Creatividad• Motivación• Conocimientos• Oportunidad• Estilo de creatividad• Coraje para ser creativo• Aceptación de la propia personalidad• Coraje para ser diferente » (Freeman 1998). CRP-2-Creatividad 51
    • 49. P´s de la creatividad• Persona• Proceso• Lugar• Producto CRP-2-Creatividad 52
    • 50. El individuo creativo se acopla a un proceso creativo en un ambiente creativo generando productos creativos. AmbienteCreatividad innata Proceso Creativo ProductoCaracterísticas individuales Creativo CRP-2-Creatividad 53
    • 51. Persona• Destreza con el pensamiento creativo• Destreza en el dominio de trabajo• Motivación intrínseca • Pero,...podría Einstein crear una pagina web con juegos en red? CRP-2-Creatividad 54
    • 52. Características de las personas muy creativas• Muy curiosos, inhibidos, radicales• Generan muchas ideas• Montones de cuestiones• Toman muchos riesgos• Campo muy amplio de interés• Coleccionistas de cosas inusuales• Pensamiento lateral• Determinación a tener éxito, tenacidad perseverancia, compromiso con la tarea CRP-2-Creatividad 55
    • 53. Características de las personas muy creativas• Juguetón Intelectual, le gustan los marcos conceptuales, atraído por la novedad y la complejidad• Gran sentido del humor (Frecuentemente estrafalario, irreverente, inapropiado)• Muy auto-consciente y abierto a lo irracional consigo mismo.• Intuitivo / mucha sensibilidad emocional• Inconformista, tolera la ambigüedad, acepta el caos, no esta interesado en los detalles.• Descrito como “individualista” no le preocupa que se le clasifique como “diferente”, preocupado internamente, necesita tiempo para pensar.• No desea aceptar lo que dice la autoridad sin auto- examinar con mucha critica. CRP-2-Creatividad 56
    • 54. Rasgos negativos de la creatividad• Tiende a cuestionar leyes, reglas y autoridad• Indiferente a las convenciones y cortesía usuales• Testarudo, no coopera, se resiste a ser dominado.• Argumenta que el resto están fuera de onda• Discute, es cínico, sarcástico, rebelde.• Reclama, es asertivo, autocrático• Tiene poco interés en los detalles• Descuidado, desorganizado con asuntos poco importantes. CRP-2-Creatividad 57
    • 55. Rasgos negativos de la creatividad• Centrados en ellos mismos, sin tacto e intolerantes• Caprichosos• Temperamentales, cambios de humor.• Emocionales, abandonan, reservados, poco comunicativos.• Olvidadizos, mentes ausentes, divagan, miran las ventanas.• Hiperactivos física o mentalmente• No les gusta pertenecer a organizaciones, clubs, no son jugadores de equipo. CRP-2-Creatividad 58
    • 56. Proceso • Mirando a los estados, pasos, acciones y comportamientos.• Preparación,• Incubación• Iluminación• verificacióne.g. Wallas model(1926) of the Creativeprocess CRP-2-Creatividad 59
    • 57. I. II.Preparación Análisis Imaginación Observación Generación Vivir con ello Cosecha Implementación Intensificación IV. Evaluación III. Acción Desarrollo CRP-2-Creatividad 60
    • 58. El proceso creativo• Proceso creativo = Puesta en acción + implementación de ideas + equilibrio entre imaginación y análisis + pensamiento divergente y convergente.• Debemos hacer mas que simplemente imaginar cosas nuevas, debemos trabajar para hacerlas realidades concretas CRP-2-Creatividad 61
    • 59. “El que tiene imaginación pero no sabe aprender es como el que tiene alas pero no pies ” CRP-2-Creatividad 62
    • 60. Lugar: ampliadores de la creatividad en la organización.• Libertad (autonomía para operar especialmente)• Buena gestión de proyectos• Recursos suficientes• Un clima que premie la innovación y permita los fracasos• Tiempo suficiente para ser creativos• Presión pero dentro de unos limites CRP-2-Creatividad 63
    • 61. Lugar: Asesinos de la creatividad• Evaluaciones• Restricciones• Indiferencia• Competición• Presiones con el tiempo (cuando son muy altas) CRP-2-Creatividad 64
    • 62. Producto• Mirar la composición, diseño, innovación, terminado, meritos. ? CRP-2-Creatividad 65
    • 63. Continuo de la creatividad REPLICA FORMULACIÓN INNOVACIÓN ORIGINAL CRP-2-CreatividadBased on Fennell, E., (1993) Categorising Creativity in Competence & Assessment No. 23, Oct. 1993, Employment Dept. 66
    • 64. Replicas• El proceso y los materiales están predefinidos con poca variación.• Líneas de producción en masa, personal de un bar. CRP-2-Creatividad 67
    • 65. Formulación• Los procesos y los materiales estan claramente definidos, se permiten variaciones dentro de unos limites acordados, incluso se agradecen.• Albañil, pintor, decorador, jefe, camarero en un restaurante• Orquestas, actores. CRP-2-Creatividad 68
    • 66. Innovación• Los materiales y sus procesos son discrecionales pero el trabajo se delimita por ciertas convenciones.• Arquitectos, puestos directivos• Diseñadores de paginas Web, analistas de aplicaciones. CRP-2-Creatividad 69
    • 67. ORIGINATION Originadores • Los procesos y materiales son discrecionales y el trabajo no tiene precedentes o va mas allá de lo establecido convencionalmente. • Creadores/ diseñadores de soluciones sin precedentes, productores que usan métodos nuevos o producen nuevos productos. • Compositores CRP-2-Creatividad 70
    • 68. Seis habilidades del pensamiento creativo• Juicio controlado• Hacer preguntas• Cambiar las perspectivas• Ampliar los límites• Hacer asociaciones• Imaginar consecuencias CRP-2-Creatividad 71
    • 69. Juicio controlado• Suelen formarnos en el juicio critico. – ¿qué piensas cuando te dice que se va de viaje hoy? – ¿vamos a la playa?• Solemos controlar todos nuestros pensamientos antes de que aparezcan.• Autocensura• Pero la creatividad requiere poca censura.• Primero alternativas, después ya veremos.• Apartar el Juicio, no disminuirlo CRP-2-Creatividad 72
    • 70. Ideas y evaluaciónAcelerador y freno CRP-2-Creatividad 73
    • 71. Beneficios de controlar el juicio• Producir mayores cantidades• Mejorar la eficacia (más rápido)• Retener la semilla creativa• Proporcionar oportunidades para las combinaciones creativas• Incrementar el potencial para mejores decisiones.• Reducir el conflicto personal• Incrementar la propiedad del grupo CRP-2-Creatividad 74
    • 72. Hacer preguntas• Los niños preguntan,… ¿porque?• Los mayores no… ¿por qué?• Necesitamos aumentar nuestra capacidad de preguntar.• Mejora: – Suposiciones que bloquean caminos. – Considerar otros puntos de vista – Información para combinar CRP-2-Creatividad 75
    • 73. Preguntas típicas• ¿por qué?• Organización (prioridades)• Números ¿cuánto?• Fechas ¿cuándo?• Emociones ¿quiénes? ¿emociones?• Resultados ¿qué se espera? CRP-2-Creatividad 76
    • 74. Cambiar las perspectivas• Reconfigurar lo que vemos• Trabajar desde el final• Ponerse como el competidor• Mirar a través de los ojos del cliente• Imagen global frente a imagen reducida• Perspectivas personales – Sherlock Holmes, Disney,… CRP-2-Creatividad 77
    • 75. CRP-2-Creatividad 78
    • 76. CRP-2-Creatividad 79
    • 77. CRP-2-Creatividad 80
    • 78. Ampliar los límites• Tengo que medir medio litro de agua, y necesito una jarra graduada.• Salir de la Caja• 3M un ejemplo de ampliar los límites CRP-2-Creatividad 81
    • 79. Hacer asociaciones• Es el corazón de la creatividad – Nike y los gofres – Textiles – Cortacésped - dentistas – Fabricas al ultimo piso – Militar – para cocinar• Como hacer las asociaciones – Tienen algo en común – Evitar barreras – Pregunta: “¿esto no recuerda…?, ¿qué podríamos aprender o utilizar de …? ¿cómo solucionaría esto un mecánico? CRP-2-Creatividad 82
    • 80. Imaginar consecuencias• ¿qué pasaría si …? Área Efectos en Efectos afectada el área específicos CRP-2-Creatividad 83

    ×