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Shaping Ideas – LogFrame Workshop at the oikos Winter School 2008
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Shaping Ideas – LogFrame Workshop at the oikos Winter School 2008

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Great projects start from great ideas – but these need shaping and modelling. This workshop introduces a method (LogFrame) for forming an idea into a project, reaching clarity about the overall goal …

Great projects start from great ideas – but these need shaping and modelling. This workshop introduces a method (LogFrame) for forming an idea into a project, reaching clarity about the overall goal and mission, the specific change mechanisms and the ultimate actions. LogFrames also help to set indicators of success and to reflect and ques-tions the key assumptions behind the pro-ject. Whether done alone or as a group exer-cise, they create common understanding and clarity towards outside parties. In the work-shop, participants will not only learn about the method, but apply it to their ideas to take them to the ‘next level’.

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    • 1. Shape Your Ideas oikos Winter School 2008 Katharina Beck & Martin Herrndorf University Witten/Herdecke 20 November 2008 based on a presentation by Kim Poldner and Martin Herrndorf at the oikos Autumn Meeting 2008, Graz Alpstein Fotos: Katharina Beck; LogFrame Content based on BOND publication
    • 2. Agenda 2 A project as a journey 1 Introduction and expectations 3 The Logical Framework (LogFrame) Method 4 Group work on your project ideas 5 Discussion and Feedback
    • 3. Agenda 2 A project as a journey 1 Introduction and expectations 3 The Logical Framework (LogFrame) Method 4 Group work on your project ideas 5 Discussion and Feedback
    • 4. Intro: The Butterfly Effect
    • 5.
      • ...you w ill have learned how to
      • systematically shape your project – from high-level goals to nitty-gritty activities.
      • g et agreement on your project shape in your project team through systematic group work.
      • communicate your project shape systematically to external partners (and funders …)
      • develop indicators for your goals – for checking progress and following-up
      • identify critical issues and assumptions of your project
      After this workshop...
    • 6.
      • We are convinced this workshop is important for shaping your project idea.
      • To make it a success, please
      • Jump in with questions whenever they are appropriate.
      • Bring in your project idea and aspirations.
      • Be flexible enough to challenge your idea.
      • Give the workshop time to develop its content.
      • If you feel it really does not matter for you, feel free to do something else (without disturbing the rest)
      Some rules.
    • 7. Agenda 2 A project as a journey 1 Introduction and expectations 3 The Logical Framework (LogFrame) Method 4 Group work on your project ideas 5 Discussion and Feedback
    • 8.
      • A project is like a journey!
      • so...
      • How do you find your way?
      Measuring and managing
    • 9. How do you find your way?
    • 10. How do you find your way?
    • 11. How do you find your way?
    • 12. How do you find your way?
    • 13. How do you find your way?
    • 14. How do you find your way?
    • 15. How do you find your way?
    • 16. How do you find your way?
    • 17. Agenda 2 A project as a journey 1 Introduction and expectations 3 The Logical Framework (LogFrame) Method 4 Group work on your project ideas 5 Discussion and Feedback
    • 18. Why use a logical framework? 1 Goal 2 Purposes 3 Outputs 4 Activities 5 Input
    • 19. What is in a logical framework? (1) State the overall goal – the project’s contribution to societal or env. progress 1 Goal Describe the purposes of your project, like the direct benefits to your target group(s)) 2 Purpose List the outputs – tangible products or services – that you deliver in the project? 3 Outputs List the activities that you will undertake to deliver the desired outputs 4 Activities List the inputs that you need to implement the planned activities? 5 Input Control Importance
    • 20. LogFrame: “Getting into the day” “ Be well-prepared for the day” 1 Goal “ Have all my stuff with me” “Look nice and be healthy” 2 Purpose “ Bag packed with books and laptop” “ Clean, shaven and perfumed body” 3 Outputs “ Check agenda and collect books for courses” “ Check laptop battery, cables and adaptors” “ Take a shower and shave afterwards” 4 Activities “ Agenda, course list and bookshelf” “ Backpack with stuff from yesterday” “ Bathroom, running water, shaver” 5 Input Control Importance
    • 21. Why use a logical framework?
      • Where do you stand?
      • How does this compare to your ambitions?
      • What are the next steps you should take?
      • Should you adapt your goals or your activities?
      „ encourages the discipline of clear and specific thinking“ Preparation Running Follow-up
      • What do you want to achieve?
      • What action do you want to take?
      • What resources do you need?
      • What could be the limitations you phase?
      internal
      • What did you achieve?
      • Did you achieve your initial goals?
      • Where your assumptions realistic?
      • What would you do different next time?
    • 22. Why use a logical framework?
      • Are you achieving what you promised?
      • When you change course, does your project still aim for the same objectives?
      „ encourages the discipline of clear and specific thinking“ Preparation Running Follow-up
      • Why should a partner team up with you?
      • Do you have coherent or conflicting goals?
      • Why are you attractive for funders?
      • How do you contribute to their goals?
      external
      • What did you achieve?
      • Did you partners and funders achieve their goals?
      • Does this lay the basis for future co-operations?
    • 23. Shaping Exercise 1
      • Split into two-person groups
      • Work individually on your project idea
        • Work top-down!
        • Move from goal to activities
        • Depending on time, only fill sample activities
      • Explain your LogFrame to your partner
        • Explain bottom-up!
        • Move from activities to goals
        • Discuss: Does the LogFrame make sense?
        • Depending on time, only fill sample activities
      • Panel discussion
        • What did you learn in this exercise?
    • 24. What is in a logical framework? (2) 1 Goal 2 Purposes 3 Outputs 4 Activities 5 Input How to measure?
      • Concrete indicators
      • Specify data sources
      • Include (scoping / feedback) questionnaires into your project.
      • Be realistic and ambitious
      • Might feed back in goal definition!
      • Consider degree of control
    • 25. What is in a logical framework? (2) How to measure?
      • Quality: What shall change?
      • Quantity: By how much?
      • Timing: By when?
      “ I want to encourage sustainability transportation patterns at our university” “ I want to have 200 free, shared bicycles on the university campus by November 2009”
    • 26. Side-talk: Typical oikos indicators
    • 27. Shaping Exercise 2
      • Split into the same two-person groups
      • Work individually on your project idea
        • Fill in indicators in your sheet
        • 1 for goal, 2 for purposes, 3 for activities
      • Explain your LogFrame to your partner
        • Explain your indicators
        • Discuss: How good are these indicators? Precision?
      • Panel discussion
        • What did you learn in this exercise?
    • 28. What is in a logical framework? (3) 1 Goal 2 Purpose 3 Outputs 4 Activities 5 Input Assumptions
      • Logic between the layers
      • “ If management students take part in a seminar on renewable energy with a clean venture investor, they will be more aware about the chances of renewable energy”.
      • External factors beyond your control
      • “ No major university block seminars will be placed on the same date as the congress”
    • 29. What is in a logical framework? (3)
      • Sharpen your project understanding
      • Critically challenge: How high is the likelihood for this assumption?
      • Risk assessment: ‘The Killer Assumption’
      • Adapt or extend your project
      • Can you extend your project to cover assumptions or external factors?
      • Which partners can you involve to cope with external factors?
      • Do alterative activities rest on different / fewer assumptions?
      1 Goal 2 Purpose 3 Outputs 4 Activities 5 Input Assumptions
    • 30. Shaping Exercise 3
      • Split into the same two-person groups
      • Work individually on your project idea
        • Fill in assumptions in your sheet
        • 2 for each linkage (1 logic, 1 external factor)
      • Explain your LogFrame to your partner
        • Explain your assumptions
        • Discuss: How good are these indicators? Precision?
      • Panel discussion
        • What did you learn in this exercise?
    • 31. Further reading & surfing…………
      • Bell, Simon; Morse, Stephen (2008); Sustainability Indicators: Measuring the Immeasurable?
      • George, Clive; Kirkpatrick, Colin (2007); Impact Assessment and Sustainable Development: European Practice and Experience (Evaluating Sustainable Development)
      • BOND: Logical Framework Analysis. BOND Guidance Notes Series (nice introduction and overview on LogFrames)
      • European Commission: Project Cycle Management Guidelines. Aid Delivery Methods, Volume 1 (nicely prepared, but very extensive treatment of LogFrames and other tools)
      • Lawlor, E., Neitzert, E., & Nicholls, J. (2008). Measuring real value: A guide to Social Return on Investment. London, UK: new economics foundation (nef). (variant to LogFrame, wider scope)
      • Butterfly-works: www.butterfly-works.org
    • 32. LogFrame Summary 1 Goal 2 Purpose 3 Outputs 4 Activities 5 Input Assumptions Indicators & data sources Indicators & data sources Indicators & data sources Indicators & data sources Indicators & data sources
    • 33. Agenda 2 A project as a journey 1 Introduction and expectations 3 The Logical Framework (LogFrame) Method 4 Group work on your project ideas 5 Discussion and Feedback
    • 34. Group work … If we would have some time left …
      • Spend some time revising the LogFrame you started during the previous exercises.
      • Write questions on the board
      • Martin and Katharina answer your specific questions individually / in small group / in plenum, depending on the interest others have in the question.
    • 35. Group work … As we have some time left …
      • Spend some time revising the LogFrame you started during the previous exercises.
      • Write questions on the board
      • Martin and Katharina answer your specific questions individually / in small group / in plenum, depending on the interest others have in the question.
    • 36. Agenda 2 A project as a journey 1 Introduction and expectations 3 The Logical Framework (LogFrame) Method 4 Group work on your project ideas 5 Discussion and Feedback
    • 37. Discussion
      • Did LogFrame help you to shape your project idea?
      • Is it a method you will use for shaping your project further (and preparing your S aturday presentation)?
      • Is it a method you would like to use in the future on other projects?
      • Oh, and what did you like about the workshop?
    • 38. What to keep in mind…..
      • Well, you might…
      • Continuously reflect on your project;
      • Balance ‘questioning’ and ‘full steam’;
      • Not drown yourself in paperwork, but keep it simple;
      • Be out there and not locked in an office
      • And also…
      • Act from the heart & with good intentions;
      • Trust that you actually can have a great impact!
    • 39. Be a butterfly until you're 88! a nd beyond …
    • 40. Thanks for... oikos Winter School 2008 Katharina Beck & Martin Herrndorf beck@oikosinternational.org, herrndorf@oikosinternational.org University Witten/Herdecke 20 November 2008

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