Japan

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Japan

  1. 1. Japan Dammm this background is pretty.
  2. 2. <ul><li>During the 7th – 8th centuries C.E the Japanese court in Nara was being influenced by cultural influences of the Chinese. </li></ul><ul><li>Shinto views of the natural and supernatural world influenced Japan’s cultural development. </li></ul>Japan: The Imperial Age
  3. 3. <ul><li>During the Taika(645-710), Nara(710-784), and Heian(794-857) periods, Japan began borrowing selectively from China greatly. </li></ul><ul><li>Taika Reforms - also known as “The Great Reform” were a set of doctrines established by Emperor Kōtoku to reunite Japan after the fall of the Soga Clan. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>In 646, Taika Reforms were aimed at fixing administration along Chinese lines. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Aristocrats in Japanese society took up Confucian ways, worshiped in Chinese-style temples, and Buddhist arts. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Peasants looked up to Buddhist monks for cures, Buddhist magic, or a change of luck. </li></ul><ul><li>They combined Buddhist deities with the “ kami ” ancient nature spirits of Japan. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Spread of Buddhism
  8. 8. <ul><li>The Taika Reforms were meant to create a bureaucracy and peasant conscript army in Japan similar to the one in Han and Tang China. </li></ul><ul><li>Attempts at these goals were disrupted by aristocratic families and Buddhist monastic orders. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>A century after the Taika Reforms, Buddhist monks grew powerful and bold and became known as “ rowdy monks ” </li></ul><ul><li>In 760, the monks influence even threatened to get the throne. A buddhist prelate got into empress Koken’s inner circle and schemed to marry her before his plans were foiled. </li></ul>X
  10. 10. <ul><li>Koken’s husband fled 28 miles and established a new capital city at Heian.(Kyoto) </li></ul><ul><li>Though buddhist monasteries weren’t allowed to be built in Kyoto, they still rose in power by building monasteries surrounding Kyoto. </li></ul>
  11. 11. <ul><li>Koken’s husband fled 28 miles and established a new capital city at Heian.(Kyoto) </li></ul><ul><li>Though buddhist monasteries weren’t allowed to be built in Kyoto, they still rose in power by building monasteries surrounding Kyoto. </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>The emperor abandoned the Taika Reforms to control the Buddhist monks. </li></ul><ul><li>Instead of making a peasant conscript army, local leaders were ordered to organize a militia which later on led to loss of control in the imperial household. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Ultracivilized: Court Life in the Heian Era <ul><li>For several centuries more in the Heian Era, they lived in luxury and aesthetic pleasures. </li></ul><ul><li>In this era, social status meant everything. </li></ul><ul><li>Affairs such as dating and marrying were a very important thing! </li></ul>
  14. 14. Living Quarters <ul><li>The imperial family and aristocratic families lived in grand palaces and gardens including fish ponds, artificial lakes, and waterfalls. </li></ul>
  15. 15. The Tale of Genji <ul><li>The most valued art in court was writing verse known to us as poetry . </li></ul><ul><li>Poetry was used to express feelings such as happiness, pleasure, love, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Lady Murasaki wrote “The Tale of Genji”, the first novel in any language. </li></ul>
  16. 16. <ul><li>According to “The Tale of Genji” women were seen as equally dignified as men. </li></ul><ul><li>Women were usually taught to play musical instruments and to write poetry. </li></ul><ul><li>They ALSO had power struggles just like everywhere else. </li></ul>

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