Australia Government

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Australia Government

  1. 1. Government and Citizenship Role
  2. 2. What type of Government does Australia have? <ul><li>Australia is a commonwealth of Great Britain; therefore, to the world it’s government is a parliamentary democracy. </li></ul><ul><li>The nation remains a member of Britain's Commonwealth and officially recognizes Queen Elizabeth II as its monarch and head of State. </li></ul><ul><li>Australia no longer belongs to Britain, yet it still accepts the British king or queen as its ceremonial leader. </li></ul><ul><li>Although the Queen is head of state, she is represented by a governor-general (currently Quentin Bryce), who is Australian. The governor general reports directly to the queen on behalf of citizens of Australia. </li></ul>
  3. 3. What does a Common Wealth Mean? <ul><li>The Commonwealth of Australia was formed in 1901 through the federation of six states under a single constitution. </li></ul><ul><li>A commonwealth is an English term for a political community founded for the common good where all participants are considered equal. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1901, Australia was given the right to self-govern by the British parliament. </li></ul><ul><li>Australia wanted to remain connected to Great Britain. By staying connected to the British government, military protection was granted and a federal government was established. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>The Commonwealth of Australia was formed in 1901 when six independent British colonies agreed to join together and become states of a new nation. </li></ul><ul><li>The rules of government for this new nation were enshrined in the Australian Constitution, which defined how the Commonwealth Government was to operate and what issues it could pass laws on. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Confederation <ul><li>Role of a Confederation </li></ul><ul><li>Australian States have power over all matters. </li></ul><ul><li>These local governments protect and operate under their own authority. </li></ul><ul><li>The central Australian government has less power than the Australian states. </li></ul><ul><li>Leaders are elected by the Australian people. </li></ul><ul><li>Commonwealth Parliament </li></ul><ul><li>The Commonwealth of Australia was formed in 1901 when six independent British colonies agreed to join together and become states of a new nation. </li></ul><ul><li>The rules of government for this new nation were enshrined in the Australian Constitution, which defined how the Commonwealth Government was to operate and what issues it could pass laws on. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Responsible Government <ul><li>Australia has one of the oldest democracies in the world. The common wealth of Australia was established in 1901. </li></ul><ul><li>Democratic practices were adopted by Australia’s first federal government. Australia is an independent country but holds political ties with Great Britain. </li></ul><ul><li>The founders of the new nation believed they were creating something new and were concerned to avoid the pitfalls of the old world. </li></ul><ul><li>They wanted Australia to be harmonious, united, and equal for everyone who lived there. </li></ul><ul><li>The founders had progressive ideas about human rights, the observance of democratic procedures and the value of a secret ballot. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Australian Government </li></ul><ul><li>Although the six states joined together to form the Commonwealth of Australia and the Commonwealth Government, they still each retain the power to make their own laws. </li></ul><ul><li>State governments also have their own constitutions, as well as a structure of legislature, executive and judiciary. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Australia is a federation and power is shared between three levels of government. </li></ul><ul><li>Each level of government is run by a democratically elected council or parliament. </li></ul><ul><li>These councils and parliaments have power to collect taxes to pay for their own programs. </li></ul><ul><li>States also fund local council activities. </li></ul>
  9. 9. <ul><li>State powers include almost everything that the states did not give to the Commonwealth when the federation was formed. </li></ul><ul><li>States are especially in charge of: </li></ul><ul><li>Healthcare </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation </li></ul><ul><li>Local Law Enforcement </li></ul>
  10. 10. CRCT Coach Book and Review Activity

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