The Girl Scout/Dove Self-Esteem program




                                          uniquely ME!
                       ...
uniquely ME! The Girl Scout/Dove Self-Esteem program
Guide for facilitators
what is uniquely me?
Created by Girl Scouts of...
GUIDE
TaBLE OF CONTENTS


intro guide
                                   T
                                    heGirlScouT...
GUIDE
research

what is self-esteem?
According to the National Association for Self-Esteem*,
someone who possesses self-es...
self-esteem and girls
Low self-esteem is pervasive among pre-adolescent and adolescent girls in the United States.
Researc...
Girls with low self-esteem are significantly more likely to engage in
      negative behaviors:
      • 75% of girls with ...
the girl scout leadership experience
The Girl Scout Leadership Experience enables girls to develop the values and skills t...
processes that support
      a leadership experience
      It is not just “what” girls do, but also “how” they do it that ...
LEARNING BY DOING
In addition to doing activities, the girls will also need time to reflect on what they have done - refle...
Towards Leadership
Outcomes
                                                                               sAmple session
...
GETTING STaRTED

session Overview
The uniquely ME! sessions in this facilitator guide are based on two of the three Keys t...
Sample SeSSion
                                                                       Each activity in this guide is desig...
Building a uniquely ME!
“Tool Box”
To help prepare you to lead sessions,
you’ll need to bring a little tool box to every
s...
facilitator tips
Dealing with Tweens and Teens
The facilitator’s role is to help girls achieve a level of comfort with and...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Intro

779

Published on

Published in: Sports, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
779
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Intro"

  1. 1. The Girl Scout/Dove Self-Esteem program uniquely ME! guide for facilitators look you can change the way you world looks at girls or you can change the way the uniquely me / turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 1
  2. 2. uniquely ME! The Girl Scout/Dove Self-Esteem program Guide for facilitators what is uniquely me? Created by Girl Scouts of the USA and Unilever to address the critical nationwide problem of low self-esteem among adolescent and pre-adolescent girls, the uniquely ME! program is designed to foster positive self- esteem among girls, ages 8 to 17, in the United States and Puerto Rico. The program was launched in 2002 with a goal of reaching thousands of girls of diverse backgrounds within the first three years. In 2005, The Dove Self- Esteem Fund, which supports initiatives that help educate and inspire girls to embrace a wider definition of beauty, began to work through the Unilever Foundation to sponsor uniquely ME! directly. The program aims to address the challenges girls face in their daily lives, in addition to helping girls build a strong sense of self, develop healthy relationships and take care of their bodies and minds. how does uniquely me! foster positive self-esteem? uniquely ME! consists of a curriculum that integrates the latest research from the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI) and learning by doing. Four activity booklets, available in English and bilingual English/Spanish, guide girls through simple, but meaningful exercises which lead them to understand and build their self-confidence. The booklets target three developmental levels: uniquely ME! The Way To Be/Nadie Como yo! Una manera de ser for 8 to 10 year-olds, uniquely ME! Inside & Out and uniquely ME! The Real Deal for 11 to 14 year-olds, and Mirror, Mirror: Discover Your Inner Beauty for 14 to 17 year-olds. Uniquely ME! sessions are led by caring adult volunteers and include exercises about recognizing one’s strengths and best attributes, handling peer pressure, developing a positive body image, thinking critically about the influence of the media, developing healthy habits to take care of the body and mind, and identifying personal interests and core values. THIS UNIQUELY ME! GUIDE FOR FACILITATORS has been created for Girl Scout volunteers and staff in a variety of settings as well as school personnel and other adults interested in facilitating uniquely ME! sessions. The session design includes step-by-step activities based on uniquely ME! print resources and the outcomes of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience - they were developed from field-tested uniquely ME! exercises run at councils across the country. The activities in this guide can be used in troop meetings, to create a series of events, or provide a focus for Special Interest groups. The goal of uniquely ME! is to provide girls with opportunities to strengthen their self- esteem. Along the way, the exercises will help girls find their voice, challenge themselves, make friends, and have fun. uniquely me! turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 2
  3. 3. GUIDE TaBLE OF CONTENTS intro guide T heGirlScouT research leaderShipexperience GettinG started 4 What is Self-Esteem? 7 Three Keys to 11 Session Overview 4 What Causes Low Self-Esteem? Leadership Experience 12 Meeting Format 5 Self-Esteem and Girls 8 Processes that Support a Leadership Experience 13 Building a “Tool Box” 6 Self-Esteem and Leadership 9 Outcomes: Benefits to Girls 14 Facilitator’s Tips the sessions Girl scout Girl scout Girl scout senior/ Junior sessions cadette sessions ambassador sessions (Grades 4-5) (Grades 6-8) (Grades 9-12) session one session one session one all about me! me, myself and i the real me session tWo session tWo session tWo me and the media the “me” in the mind over media session three media session three me inside and out session three dare to shine session Four Serene Scene session Four me and you session Four uniquely me / turnkey curriculum my relationships, truth and myself GUIDE / paGE 3 INTRO consequences
  4. 4. GUIDE research what is self-esteem? According to the National Association for Self-Esteem*, someone who possesses self-esteem feels capable of meeting life’s challenges and also feels worthy of experiencing happiness. Individuals with high self-esteem can be what causes low characterized by the following traits: self-esteem? • Tolerance and respect for others There are many potential causes for low-esteem** • Ability to accept responsibility for their actions - the following are a few of the more common reasons that people develop low self-esteem: • Having integrity • Believing the negative and hurtful words and • Taking pride in their accomplishments actions of others • Being self-motivated • Living with people who did not or do not love • Willingness to take risks and respect themselves • Being capable of handling criticism • Having negative thoughts about performance, • Being loving and lovable looks, family income level and I.Q. • Seeking the challenge and stimulation of worthwhile goals • Being under or over-protected as a child • Wanting to take control of their lives • Not being taught “I am good and of value and loved no matter what” Self-esteem can reveal itself many ways – through creative • Doubting the love of one or both parents (the esteem, athletic esteem, personality esteem, relationship absence of parents also hurts) esteem and of course, body esteem. Self-esteem means • Being punished without ever being taught to having confidence in oneself, in addition to being capable of separate self from bad behaviors feeling self-satisfaction. It is important to note that a strong • Being compared to others or to perfect standards sense of self esteem is based on values and self awareness that cannot be met with regard to others as opposed to a “false bravado” that • Thinking that “you” are your possessions, often contributes to bullying behaviors. clothes, car, grades, job, looks, or I.Q. “The True Meaning of Self-Esteem,” Robert Reasoner, National Association **“Empowering Teens To Build Self-Esteem,” Suzanne E. for Self-Esteem 2000. Harrill, M.Ed. 1993. uniquely me! turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 4
  5. 5. self-esteem and girls Low self-esteem is pervasive among pre-adolescent and adolescent girls in the United States. Research conducted by organizations including the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI) and The Dove Self-Esteem Fund (DSEF) demonstrates that eating disorders and risky behaviors such as smoking and drinking are often associated with low self-esteem. This research also reveals the alarming reality that self-esteem issues affect every aspect of a girl’s life: reality vs. perception Low self-esteem significantly impacts girls’ overall feelings about their own beauty: • 71% of girls with low self-esteem feel their appearance does not measure up – they report not feeling pretty enough, thin enough or stylish/trendy enough (compared to 29% of girls with high self- esteem). • 78% of girls with low self-esteem admit that it is hard to feel good in school when you do not feel good about how you look (compared to 54% of girls with high self-esteem). • A girl’s self-esteem is more strongly related to how she views her body shape and weight, than to how much she actually weighs. 7 in 10 girls believe they are not good enough or do not measure up in some way, including based on their looks, performance in school and in their relationships with friends and family members. • 62% of all girls feel insecure or not sure of themselves. • 57% of all girls have a mother who criticizes her own looks. • The top wish among girls is that their parents would communicate better with them – including more frequent and more open conversations about what is happening in their own lives. uniquely me / turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 5
  6. 6. Girls with low self-esteem are significantly more likely to engage in negative behaviors: • 75% of girls with low self-esteem reported engaging in negative activities such as disordered eating, cutting, bullying, smoking, or drinking when feeling badly about themselves (compared to 25% of girls with high self-esteem). • 25% of teen girls with low self-esteem practice disordered eating, such as starving themselves, refusing to eat, or over-eating and throwing up when they are feeling badly about themselves (compared to 7% of girls with high self-esteem). • 25% of teen girls with low self-esteem resort to injuring themselves on purpose or cutting when they are feeling badly about themselves (compared to 4% of girls with high self-esteem). • 61% of teen girls with low self-esteem admit to talking badly about themselves (compared to 15% of girls with high self-esteem). “Real Girls, Real Pressure: A National Report on the State of Self-Esteem” commissioned by the Dove Self-Esteem Fund, 2008. they are not good enough or do not measure up in some way, including based on their looks, performance in school and in their relationships with friends and family members. Self-Esteem and Leadership According to research done by the Girl Scout Research Institute (GSRI), self-esteem and self confidence are fundamental elements girls need to become leaders. Based on data from a GSRI online survey done in 2007, girls overwhelming agree that good leaders possess the following three qualities: 1 A positive attitude (86%) 2 The ability to listen (85%) 3 Confidence (84%) These qualities will help girls navigate and cope with a range of personal and social situations, as well as enhancing their overall Girl Scout Leadership Experience. In Change It Up! What Girls Say About Redefining Leadership, (GSRI 2008), research indicates that the most influential factor in a girl’s desire to actively pursue leadership is confidence in her skills and competencies. Interestingly, it is not only what skills youth rate themselves highly on that impact their leadership aspirations, but how much confidence they have in general. The greatest single barrier to leadership seems to be low self-regard about skills and qualities. Overall, there is a strong relationship between a girl’s self-regard and her leadership capabilities - youth who report high self-regard of their skills and qualities and have a strong sense of self-esteem are more likely to aspire to leadership. uniquely me! turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 6
  7. 7. the girl scout leadership experience The Girl Scout Leadership Experience enables girls to develop the values and skills they need to become leaders in their lives right now and in the future. The Girl Scout Leadership Experience is built on the three Girl Scout Keys to leadership, which advocate that girls become leaders by: DisCovering Understanding themselves and their values, and using both their knowledge and skills to explore the world. ConneCTing Caring about, inspiring, and teaming up with others, both locally and globally. TAking ACTion Acting to make the world a better place. Self-esteem is an integral part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. All of the uniquely ME! activities in this facilitator guide are built on the first two Keys to Leadership: Discover and Connect. Girls may choose to go on to experience other Girl Scout programs that engage them in the third key to leadership: Take Action. To ensure that the Girl Scout Leadership Experience is meaningful and beneficial for girls, all of the proposed activities are tied to a core set of national leadership outcomes, and are infused with processes of girl-led, learning by doing, and cooperative learning. The activities are designed to help raise girls confidence, while also encouraging them to develop positive attitudes toward learning. By taking time to reflect during pivotal points throughout the experience - specifically in the “Wrap Up” and “Reflection/Discussion” sections - girls will see how to apply new concepts and skills to their own lives. This learning will help them feel more confident in themselves, their skills, and their ability to achieve their goals. Finally, through their participation in the group activities described in this guide, girls will recognize the value of working together, and will ultimately feel more connected to their friends, to you, to other adults, and to their communities. uniquely me / turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 7
  8. 8. processes that support a leadership experience It is not just “what” girls do, but also “how” they do it that will make their experiences in the uniquely ME! program beneficial. It is for this reason that the three Girl Scout processes of girl-led, learning by doing and cooperative learning are integrated into all of the activities. Making sure that the girls are invested in the activities helps create an environment of fun and friendship, as well as enabling them to further develop their leadership skills. To ensure that your group of girls has a high-quality and fun learning experience, make sure to integrate all three processes into activities! You’ll notice that the session designs are built around these processes. Here are some additional tips. GIRL-LED Being “girl-led” is just what it sounds like - coaching the girls to take charge of the planning, decision making, learning, and fun as much as possible. Depending on when and where meetings take place, and how much time girls have, consider the following: • Asking for a few volunteers each session to assist you in preparing for the next session – this can include the volunteers making choices about what discussion questions you will focus on, what materials you will use and any special “add ons” the girls might think of. • Taking ten minutes at the conclusion of each session to gather and describe the next session design – you may also want to solicit ideas and input from the group. • Inviting any girls who are able to arrive 15 minutes early to help you prepare/set up. • Encouraging girls to volunteer as facilitators and try their hand at “leading” the sessions. • Inviting girls to decide a way to conclude the session and celebrate what they have learned about their unique selves. • Checking the girls interest in creating a phone, online or even texting time between meetings to keep the connections going. • Encouraging girls to think about what other activities they might like to do. Do they want to take a trip? Meet a professional? You can easily mix and match the sequence of activities based upon the interests of the girls! By standing back and letting the girls drive the conversation and create their own experiences, as much as possible, you will give them the opportunity to feel more ownership of the group and their shared experiences – which is bound to be more fun!“ uniquely me! turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 8
  9. 9. LEARNING BY DOING In addition to doing activities, the girls will also need time to reflect on what they have done - reflection and critical thinking will help them absorb a deeper meaning from each of their experiences. So, after every experience, allow time for talking, sharing and reflecting – encourage the girls to envision how they’ll apply their new insights to their lives. Articulating their thoughts and feelings is a natural way for them to consolidate all that they are discovering about themselves and their potential as leaders. COOPERATIvE LEARNING (OR ExPERIENTIAL LEARNING) When girls work toward shared goals in an atmosphere of respect and collaboration, they learn a lot from each other. Girls will especially value having a team atmosphere that makes them feel safe and supported while they work to build their relationship skills. To support their cooperative learning experience, partner with the girls and create a team agreement. Encourage them to speak openly and often about how they are functioning as a team. Also, whenever possible, encourage girls to do activities in pairs or small groups - it is simply more fun to do things with friends! outcomes: benefits to girls You may be wondering, How will I know if the girls are having a good experience, and whether they are benefiting from the self-esteem activities? Each activity in this guide is tied to a specific outcome. Checking the outcomes is like noting road signs during a trip – both let you know you are getting closer to your destination! Use the age-appropriate outcomes to help you gauge whether the girls are on their way to achieving uniquely ME! session goals. As girls practice the self-esteem building concepts within the activities, they are working toward the following Girl Scout Leadership Outcomes: • DisCover: Develop a strong sense of self • DisCover: Gain practical life skills • ConneCT: Develop healthy relationships Each session includes a prompt called “Towards Leadership Outcomes” which will explain the National Leadership Outcome focus of the session, the grade level-specific aim of the session, and signs that can be used to confirm whether the girls are on their way to achieving session goals. The accompanying chart provides a few examples of how “Towards Leadership Outcomes” defines each session. It is important to note that a girl isn’t likely to fully achieve the intended outcome/benefit after participating in only one activity. Instead of focusing on a single experience yielding a particular outcome, prioritize the girls’ repeated exposure to the activities – the outcomes will be met over a period of time and throughout the Girl Scouting experience. It is also important to remember that not all girls will demonstrate the same sign at the same time - these are only indicators and should not be used to judge girls or their abilities. uniquely me / turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 9
  10. 10. Towards Leadership Outcomes sAmple session exAmple: inDiCATors: nATionAl grADe level- “signs” ThAT girls leADership speCifiC Are working TowArDs session ouTCome DefiniTion AChieving ouTComes Discover: Girls Develop Junior Example: girls gain Girls name and recognize their session a Strong Sense of Self a clearer sense of their values, the qualities that make one individual identities in them unique, and some of the relation to, and apart from, differences between the way outside influences. they see themselves and the way others see them. Discover: Girls Develop Junior Example: Girls are Girls will be able to identify ways session a Strong Sense of Self better able to recognize that advertising, the media and two how situations, attitudes peer pressure influence their and the behaviors of others sense of self. affect their sense of self. Junior Example: Girls Girls will be able to identify session Discover: Girls Gain will increase their choices that are healthy for their Practical Life Skills three understanding of what it bodies and their minds, and means to be physically and recognize ways they can defuse emotionally healthy. stress in their every day lives. Girls will be able to identify session Connect: Girls Develop Healthy Relationships Junior Example: Girls strengthen communication communicate strategies that four skills for maintaining can be used to strengthen the healthy relationship qualities of their relationships. uniquely me! turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 10
  11. 11. GETTING STaRTED session Overview The uniquely ME! sessions in this facilitator guide are based on two of the three Keys to Leadership - Discover and Connect – and are organized by grade level: Junior, Cadette and Senior/Ambassador. Notice that the Senior/Ambassador session emphasize activities for Seniors but provide tips about modifying the session for Ambassadors based on outcomes for this higher grade level. the sessions: Girl scout Girl scout Girl scout senior/ Junior sessions cadette sessions ambassador sessions (Grades 4-5) (Grades 6-8) (Grades 9-12) session one session one session one all about me! me, myself and i the real me session tWo session tWo session tWo me and the media the “me” in the mind over media session three media session three me inside and out session three dare to shine session Four Serene Scene session Four me and you session Four my relationships, truth and myself consequences Sessions have been adapted from activities in uniquely ME! print resources and include handouts from the materials listed below. uniquely ME! Resources: uniquely ME! The Way To Be Girls 8-10 years old discover their unique qualities, the importance of challenging themselves, coping skills, and what makes a person a good friend. Activities include how to evaluate media influences and finding ways to make a difference. uniquely ME! Inside and Out Girls 11-14 years old learn to love the ski n their in! Topics include the power of body language, developing healthy eating habits and physical activity routines, and discovering one’s unique style. uniquely ME! The Real Deal Girls 11-14 years old lead activities that focus on recognizing what matters most to them, coping with feelings, dealing with social pressures, and enjoying relationships with family and friends. uniquely ME! Mirror, Mirror: Discover Your Inner Beauty Girls 14 years and older participate and lead activities that ask them to think critically about their concepts of beauty, reflect on their individual style and sense of self, embrace their strengths, and take care of their bodies and minds. additional resources SuChin Pak PSA: “It’s A Girl Thing” at www.girlscouts.org/uniquelyme uniquely me / turnkey curriculum Dove Evolution Video www.dove.com INTRO GUIDE / paGE 11
  12. 12. Sample SeSSion Each activity in this guide is designed for a 60-75 minute meeting. If your group meets for a shorter time, consider condensing activities, or spreading an activity over two meetings. Always try to leave a little time at the end of the session for girls to reflect. a typical meetinG miGht look like this: 10 minutes: Welcome (ice-breaker, opening ceremony, business) Session Format 45–55 minutes: Activity (introduction, hands-on activity, reflection/discussion) Each activity in this guide follows a 5–10 minutes: Clean-up/Closing (Wrap Up, similar format: journaling) • Objective: Snapshot of what girls will do during the session and the overall goals of their activity. • Introduction to Facilitator: Introduction to the activity, placing it in the context of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. materials Supplies • materials and supplies: additional items needed to facilitate activity and to be gathered in advance of session. Make sure to bring your uniquely ME! “Tool Box” to every session. • hands-on activities: 1 inTroDuCe Step-by-step instructions for facilitating activity - each activity is designed to help girls build a stronger sense of self, and to 2 Ask bolster their self-esteem in an engaging and fun way. 3 engAge • Wrap Up: rapup An opportunity for girls to think about and celebrate what they have learned during the session • reflection/discussion: w A list of questions and talking points designed to help girls explore and discuss how the activity’s skills and themes can reflection help in their school world and be applied to their real lives. Questions can also be used as prompts for any journal writing girls do outside of meetings. DISCUSSION QU ESTIONS uniquely me! turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 12
  13. 13. Building a uniquely ME! “Tool Box” To help prepare you to lead sessions, you’ll need to bring a little tool box to every session that includes: White Board, blackboard or large piece of paper Markers Pens and pencils Scratch paper Example of images of girls in the media Girl magazines (Seventeen, Discovery Girls, Girl’s Life, etc.) Clippings of advertisements Scissors Glue For journ aling and would be collage a helpful to ctivities, • Old scr have: it aps of fabric • Recycle d greetin g cards • Assortm ent of ma gazines ( travel, sp • Ribbon orts, hea s, stickers lth, etc.) and misc ellaneous Why not decorativ ask girls, e items library an families, d commu teachers nity for s , your loc items? Ke ome help al ep all of collecting ready for your sup these every ses plies in a sion - no box so yo Also, rem thing fan u are ember to cy is nec construc recycle! In essary. tion pape stead of r, try cutt using wh using the ing cardb ite or backs of oard from paper ma file folder boxes, terials. s, and re -using oth er uniquely me / turnkey curriculum INTRO GUIDE / paGE 13
  14. 14. facilitator tips Dealing with Tweens and Teens The facilitator’s role is to help girls achieve a level of comfort with and among themselves, feel good about their bodies and minds, and to encourage them to set and achieve reasonable goals. volunteers need not be experts in psychology – instead, ideal volunteers will just be caring and sensitive. Here are some general tips for creating an open and positive atmosphere: • Open up and share your own experiences – this will help the girls feel more comfortable and engaged. • Focus on each girl’s special abilities and characteristics - use positive reinforcement. • Be sensitive to cultural issues and parental values. • Suggest, don’t dictate. • Help each girl develop a sense of belonging within the group; encourage girls to participate in all of the activities and projects. • Listen seriously to what girls say, and encourage them to listen to and respect each other. Make a habit of soliciting answers from the group. • To keep from influencing the girls, don’t be too quick to express your own opinions. However, when only one side of an issue is presented during discussion, be sure to offer other points of view. • Handle rebellious behavior calmly - engage girls in setting behavior standards and consequences by making a “Group Pact” in the initial session. • Encourage girls to express their values and opinions. Also let girls know that it’s important to be fully informed – encourage them to research issues and always listen to other points of view. remember... • Reviewing this guide will give you confidence! • If a girl seems bored, consider asking her to take the • When preparing, make sure to review each session in lead on an activity. full before going through the activities with the girls. • Be flexible. If an activity is not working, ask girls what • It is OK not to know everything - you and the girls can they want to change or what other activity they would explore answers together. rather do. • Be enthusiastic – it’s contagious! • Know when to assert yourself – show confidence! • Get to know the girls by inquiring about each • Be consistent and fair - treat everyone alike. individually - know their likes, dislikes, and so forth. • As often as possible, let the girls lead. • Have fun! when preparing, make sure to review each session in full before going through the activities with the girls. if you have any additional questions or would like more information on the uniquely me! program, uniquely me! turnkey curriculum please go to www.girlscouts.org/uniquelyme or email uniquelyme@girlscouts.org. INTRO GUIDE / paGE 14

×