• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Literary Devices
 

Literary Devices

on

  • 9,009 views

The different literary devices we will be studying this first six weeks.

The different literary devices we will be studying this first six weeks.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
9,009
Views on SlideShare
8,985
Embed Views
24

Actions

Likes
6
Downloads
339
Comments
0

6 Embeds 24

http://www.slideshare.net 13
http://corippoengcomm.wikispaces.com 4
https://blendedschools.blackboard.com 4
http://clayschools.blackboard.com 1
https://bb9.apsb.org 1
http://jea1082.1bestarinet.net 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Literary Devices Literary Devices Presentation Transcript

    • Today is Wednesday (A Day), August 25, 2009.
    • Literary Elements/Devices (Figurative Language
    • Figurative language is a tool that an author uses to help the reader visualize what is happening in a story or poem. Figurative language is meant to be interpreted imaginatively, not literally
    • Types of Figurative Language:
      Simile
      Metaphor
      Personification
      Hyperbole
      Irony
      Symbol
      Imagery
      Alliteration
      Paradox
    • Simile
      a figure of speech that compares two dissimilar things by using the key words “like” or “as”.
      Example: Her feet felt like ice
      As old as time
      Dead as a doornail.
    • Metaphor
      • a figure of speech that compares two unlike things describing one as if it were like the other.
      *Does not use “like” or “as”
      Examples: Blanket of Darkness
      My brother’s room is a pigpen.
    • Personification
      a figure of speech in which human qualities are given to a nonhuman subject
      Example:
      The leaves danced in the autumn wind.
      The lightening lashed out with anger.
    • Hyperbole
      • an exaggerated statement or overstatement. It’s a figure of speech that is not to be taken literally.
      Example –
      • I’m so hungry I could eat a horse!
      • I’m so full I’m about to pop.
    • Irony
      The use of words to express something different or opposite from their literal meaning (Not what you expected).
      There are three types of irony
      Situational Irony
      Dramatic Irony
      Verbal Irony
    • Situational Irony
      When things turn out differently than expected.
      Examples:
      A greedy millionaire winning the lottery.
      Two bank robbers have their car stolen while robbing a bank.
      A man survives a plane crash only to be killed on the way to the hospital in an ambulance wreck.
    • Dramatic Irony
      When the audience knows something the character doesn’t.
      Example: When we know as an audience that someone is hiding in the closet, but the character doesn’t.
    • Verbal Irony
      • When the author says one thing but means another.
      • Example:
      • When somebody drops a tray of food and someone tells them “good job”.
      • When a person trips and someone tells them “Slick move, Rick”.
    • Symbol
      Symbols are animals, elements, things, places, or colors, writers use to represent other things.
      Example:
      Snake – Evil, Temptation.
      Black - Death
    • Imagery
      When an author uses words that appeal to one or more of our senses.
      Examples:
      The cold of late December blew against my skin as I walked up to my family’s festive house for our holiday dinner. As I walked in the door, the aromas of warm apple pie and honey baked ham made me feel at home once again.
    • Alliteration
      The repetition of an initial consonant sound (consonants are all of the letters of the alphabet that are not vowels.
      Example:
      "The soul selects her own society.“
      “A moist young moon hung above the mist of a neighboring meadow."
    • Paradox
      a statement that is seemingly contradictory or opposed to common sense and yet is perhaps true.
      Example:
      Freedom is Slavery
      Ignorance is bliss
      I know that I know nothing.