Steering Committee Presentation- Nov2013
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Steering Committee Presentation- Nov2013

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This presentation was presented at the November 8th, 2013 Heartland 2050 Steering Committee meeting.

This presentation was presented at the November 8th, 2013 Heartland 2050 Steering Committee meeting.

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  • After you’ve finished with your map, give it a name and choose someone from the group to present your ideas to the rest of the participants in the room. Presentation is voluntary. <br />
  • The primary way to use the basemap is to place stickers on the map to represent different types of places, from neighborhoods to mainstreets. <br />
  • Will serve as the foundation for the growth assumptions for the next lrtp <br />
  • Growth as it is currently happening is a bad thing, causing many problems and threatening our quality of life <br />
  • Growth “done right” can be a solution <br />

Steering Committee Presentation- Nov2013 Steering Committee Presentation- Nov2013 Presentation Transcript

  • Growing Responsibly. Together.
  • Land Us e
  • The P ubl i c W orks hops
  • M ore t han 500 P art i c i pant s Pottawattamie - Oct. 7 — Mid-America Center Mills Oct. 8 — Our Lady of the Holy Rosary Church, Glenwood Cass Oct. 8 — Plattsmouth State Bank Sarpy Oct. 9 — Papillion South High School Washington Oct. 9 — Blair City Council Chambers Saunders Oct. 10 — Wahoo Performing Arts Center Harrison Oct. 10 — Rand Center, Missouri Valley Douglas - Nov. 5 — Burke High School Omaha - November 4 - Yates Community Center – Multi-cultural Belleview – November 4 – Bellevue University Downtown Omaha - Nov. 5 — KANEKO Freemont – November 6 – High School Southeast Metro - Nov. 6 — Kroc Center East Pottawattamie - Nov. 6 — Oakland Community Center Northeast Metro - Nov. 7 — Lake Point Community Center Midtown Omaha - Nov. 7 — Lewis & Clark Middle School
  • R egi onal W orks hops - Chi p
  • Central Workshop
  • Housing by individual Table Average: 136,607 units
  • Employment by individual Table Average: 510,464 jobs
  • Pottawattamie Table 3
  • Pottawattamie Table 5
  • Sarpy Table 4
  • Sarpy Table 6
  • Downtown
  • Business Park
  • Commercial
  • Residential Subdivision
  • All Chips From highest to lowest density North Omaha Eppley Field Downtown Midtown South Omaha
  • All Chips Chips placed
  • Base Case Housing Units
  • Base Case Housing Units
  • All Housing Total housing placed
  • All Jobs Total employment placed
  • W ch w hi oul d c reat e t he bi gges t pos i t i ve i m t on pac heal t h i n t he regi on?
  • W c h new f orm of t rans i t hi s houl d our regi on c ons i der i nves t i ng i n?
  • In your opi ni on, w c h hi c ont ri but es m t t o t he os regi on' s qual i t y of l i f e?
  • Regional Workshops - Dot
  • Comments by Category
  • Comments by Category
  • Comments by Category – Housing
  • Comments by Subcategory – Housing
  • Comments by Subcategory - Housing
  • Top Subcategories
  • Major Themes • Cluster development near existing cities/towns/highways to preserve agricultural land • Improve employment accessibility by reinforcing existing infrastructure and investing in transit • Build single-family housing to attract new jobs and residents • Protect/reinforce/improve access to the region’s many recreational amenities • Focus on development of industrial clusters/agribusiness/high-tech related to agriculture • Revitalize downtowns and protect our existing historic/cultural amenities
  • Tonight's workshop
  • Workshop Game Pieces Mixed Use Residential Commercial Civic Employment Open Space
  • M ED USE IX Office Over Retail Housing Over Retail 37
  • Map 6
  • Map 11
  • Map 12
  • Majority (most often used devtype)
  • Mid City Mid City Vision: Pedestrian Connections and Parks • • Convention as pedestrian oriented street connecting entire district Improve and expand neighborhood parks and connections to schools and shopping
  • Major Public Workshop Findings • Infill -- Participants preferred greater population numbers in infill areas than new expansion • Wasatch Back -- Nearly all participants indicated that only minimal development should occur in the Wasatch Back • Rail Transit -- Rail was seen as an essential component of the region’s growth • Walkable -- Participants expressed a general preference for walkable development • Critical Lands -- Near general consensus that critical lands should be conserved Design
  • Scenario A New and Existing Development • Continuation of Recent Trends • Larger lot sizes • More auto-oriented development will occur.
  • Scenario B New and Existing Development • Baseline - implement adopted plans • Dispersed development pattern common in last 20-30 years
  • Scenario C New and Existing Development • More infill and redevelopment • Growth on new land focused into walkable, transit-oriented communities
  • Scenario D New and Existing Development • Significant increase in densities • Extensive infill and redevelopment • Extensive transit system
  • Indicators for Scenario Evaluation
  • Communicating with Values  Persuade with Reason  Motivate with Emotion
  • Quality Growth Goals and Strategies • • • • • • Air Quality Transportation Open Spaces Water Housing Economy
  • Safe and Secure Environment of Mind Gateway Value PERSONAL VALUES PSYCHO-SOCIAL CONSEQUENCES Get Along With Others Personal Self Esteem Enjoyment Self Personal Self Esteem Satisfaction Security Family Accomplishment Love Freedom Makes Me Happy In Better Quality Feel Control Healthy of Life Do a Better Less Worry Less Stress Job Feel Good Feel Safe Buy Other Things FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES Become a Victim of Crime Save Money ATTRIBUTES (34%) Peace Affordable Living Commonly Held Ideas More Crowds Spend Time With Family Do Other Things Children Handle Life’s Problems Save Time More Car Children Accidents Learn More Gain Have More Knowledge Choices Crime Educational System LDS Outdoor Church Recreation High Income Population Good Place for Level Taxes Growth Family/Children Scenic Beauty The People Will (Not) Be Sick Climate Traffic Infrastructure Air Quality
  • Financial Security (14%) Peace of Mind PERSONAL VALUES Personal Self Esteem Enjoyment Self Personal Self Esteem Satisfaction Security Family Accomplishment Love Freedom PSYCHO-SOCIAL Makes Me Happy CONSEQUENCES Better Quality Feel Get Along Provide Care Healthy of Life With Do a Better In for Family Less Worry Less Stress Job Others Control Feel Good Feel Safe Buy Other Things FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES Become a Victim of Crime Save Money ATTRIBUTES Commonly Held Ideas More Crowds Spend Time With Family Do Other Things Children Handle Life’s Problems Save Time More Car Children Accidents Learn More Gain Have More Knowledge Choices Will (Not) Be Sick Affordable Crime Climate Educational Living Taxes System Employment High Income Air Opportunities Level Population Quality Good Place for Traffic Growth Employment Family/Children Business Opportunities Business Opportunities Infrastructure Opportunities The People
  • Choosing a Scenario (Weighted vs. Unweighted Results) 40% Unweighted results (as represented by the black dashed line) are nearly identical to weighted results 35% 31% 30% 30% 25% 26% 25% 20% D ey on d D /D 4% 3% C /C B B /B 9% 9% B B ey on d A 0% A 5% 3% 2% 1% 1% 3% 2% 1% 1% A 10% 13% 13% C 15%
  • PUBLIC AWARENESS EFFORTS Television, Radio and Newspaper
  • Behind the Scenes gaining support from key stakeholders
  • Wasatch Choices 2040 Vision Scenario
  • Prop 3, 2006
  • Sc enari o Input s • • • • • • • • Research and Data Regional Workshops Small Area Workshops Values Surveys Community Leader ASO Scientific Survey ASO Developer Interviews Other…
  • Heart + Mind STRATEGIES Current Growth Trend Not a Good Thing Base: n=1,001 Q550. Currently there are just over 3 million people living in the San Diego region. Over the next 25 years, experts project that the size of the population in the San Diego region will increase by a million making the total number of people living in the area reach just over 4 million. Do you think that is a good thing or a bad thing? 63
  • Growth “if done right” Favored Q585. Below are the opinions of two hypothetical residents. Please indicate which opinion comes closest to your own. Is your opinion more like Mr. Smith or more like Mr. Jones? Heart + Mind Base: n=1,001 Exactly like Smith 3% Strongly like Smith 13% Somewhat like Smith 33% Mr. Jones believes that growth of any kind in the San Diego region will jeopardize the quality of life for the people in the region. Mr. Jones believes that growth should be strictly managed or limited. STRATEGIES Mr. Smith believes that growth in the San Diego region, if done right, will bring many benefits and advantages to the people in the region. Mr. Smith believes that growth should be strongly encouraged and fostered. Somewhat like Jones 23% Strongly like Jones 11% Exactly like Jones 11% Neither like Smith and Jones 49% 12% 38% 64
  • Based on what you have heard or read, which of the following do you think is the primary cause of the population growth in San Diego? Is it… Heart + Mind STRATEGIES 1. 2. New births/growing families of people already here People outside the region moving in 39% 61% 65
  • People in Region Hold Mistaken Belief About Where Growth Comes From People outside the region moving in 72% New births/growing families of people already here 28% Heart + Mind STRATEGIES They believe… Actually 63% Internal 37% Outside Base: n=809 Q560. Based on what you have heard or read, which of the following do you think is the primary cause of the population growth in the San Diego region? Is it…? 66
  • Growing Responsibly. Together.
  • SWOT Workshop Omaha-Council Bluffs SWOT Analysis Workshop SWOT Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 68
  • SWOT Analysis Internal External SWOT Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 69
  • What We Heard • Held a SWOT work session with the Greater Omaha Chamber and guests from around the region SWOT Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 70
  • What we heard: Strengths • • • • • • • • • Diversity of large sized companies Low unemployment, hard work ethic Strong education system, community colleges Many effective education and training entities such as Kiewit Institute for high tech jobs Many young people want to stay Appeal particularly to other Midwestern states Low cost of living, short commute times Incubator and start up spaces such as Mastercraft building – a haven for tech and entrepreneurs Rural character of smaller towns with great access to the metro SWOT Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 71
  • What we heard: Weaknesses • Inequality, high unemployment in minority communities • Poverty in urban core, but also unseen, growing poverty in rural areas • Low unemployment – can be challenge for new companies looking to recruit talent • Need better connection between education, job skills and employers • Lack of density in the urban core • Aging infrastructure impedes development ( in quickly urbanizing areas as well as more rural Mills County) • Not enough sites to accommodate rural growth • Sewer overflow challenges, infrastructure maintenance SWOT Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 72
  • What we heard: Opportunities • Still have work to do to attract young talent • Regionally, Omaha has a draw for young professionals – opportunity to pull nationally • Not thought of as “hip” – opportunity to change that • A place where millenials can take risks • Affordable office space • Recruit and retain international students at UNO, particularly in STEM fields • Potentially attractive location to international business looking to expand in the US • Demand for townhomes and “downsized homes” in Mills County SWOT Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 73
  • What we heard: Threats • Decay of manufacturing jobs and wages – workers can no longer live a middle class lifestyle on these wages • Migration into region and rapidly rising prices are possible (e.g., Austin) • Perception of lack of parking in downtown • Levee and flooding concerns • Uncertainty from FEMA mapping, potential effect on insurance rates • Trouble financing infrastructure SWOT Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 74
  • SWOT Analysis Internal External SWOT Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats Fregonese Associates, ECONorthwest November 2012 75