Reducing vulnerability to climate change

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  • To paraphrase Benjamin Franklin
  • This is roughly like reducing GHG emissions
  • This is roughly like reducing GHG emissions
  • This is roughly like reducing GHG emissions
  • This is roughly like reducing GHG emissions
  • This is roughly like reducing GHG emissions
  • Freshwater Future is a powerful resource investing in the people and communities caring for our Great Lakes waters.
  •    Services we provided to Yellow Dog in the last year: Financial planning Fundraising plan Through our Insight Services that allows us to offer more intensive services to groups to really get groups moving and growing success. Next step is to help them with Board Development to implement the fundraising plan and take fiduciary responsibility In addition: Cynthia Pryor’s involvement in our Advocate Mentor Program: It has been a good program. She has really enjoyed the talks and emails with Tracey. The program is a two way street—it provides benefits to both. Cynthia has enjoyed sharing things that have worked and not worked for the yellow dog . She is benefiting from having a chance to help. Freshwater Future is also supporting Anishinaabe Niijii - Protect the Earth Project Title: Truth Telling: Proving the Kennecott Ladysmith Metallic Sulfide Mine is Polluted Spring Project Grant Award: $2500 Spring TA Grant Award: $1200 Front 40 Environmental Fight Project Title: Front 40 Educational Outreach Project Spring Project Grant Award: $2000 Save the Wild U.P. Project Title: Protecting Watersheds of the Upper Peninsula and Great Lakes Basin Through Outreach and Education Spring Project Grant Award: $2200 Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve Project Title: Holding the Line: Strategic Planning for a Watershed in Danger Spring Project Grant Award: $1000
  • While litigation continues, the blasting has begun and mining will begin.
  • From Stacey Smith: Onondaga Creek Conservation Council is facilitating a community conservation effort along a stretch of urban Onondaga Creek in the city of Syracuse. Thi.s stretch runs through Kirk Park. It has very sparse, low, side vegetation. The vegetation is full of invasives. Once the invasives are removed, the vegetation will be very thin. The corridor only reaches about 10 feet out from the creek's ordinary high water mark. We are removing the invasives this summer. Then planting diverse native herbeceous, shrubs and tree species. We are choosing species with high habitat value, cultural significance, urban tolerance and climate change resilience and resistance. We will plant next fall and again in spring. We are looking at a 5 year, multi-phase project that will create a varied canopy structure and varied habitat. Mowed grass will become a native corridor and urban forest! We have formed a wonderful working team which includes: City of Syracuse City Arborist Parks and Recreation Office of Sustainability Onondaga County Soil and Water Conservation District USAD / NRCS People's Gardens NRCS Earth Core - volunteers Onondaga Earth Core - inner city youth project Cornell Cooperative Extension - volunteers SUNY College of Environmental Forestry - baseline and on-going research, volunteers and production of educational materials NYS Senator David Valesky's office - overall assistance and support Wild and Scenic Film Festival - 180 minutes of environmental films to be shown in neighborhood to help educate and involve neighborhood volunteers After DEC did not follow through on their committed work to clear former habitat site, OCCC sought and got permission from DEC and USACE for this new site. This site is in a very urban, polluted, disadvantaged section of town. This project will help bring life to the creek and also to the community! People are very excited and enthused. Neighbors who see us on site ask to help out and make their neighborhood better! OCCC is grateful and encouraged. FWF funding is what started this entire project rolling. Many thanks. Stacey Smith Onondaga Creek Conservation Council 315-470-0778
  • From Stacey Smith: Onondaga Creek Conservation Council is facilitating a community conservation effort along a stretch of urban Onondaga Creek in the city of Syracuse. Thi.s stretch runs through Kirk Park. It has very sparse, low, side vegetation. The vegetation is full of invasives. Once the invasives are removed, the vegetation will be very thin. The corridor only reaches about 10 feet out from the creek's ordinary high water mark. We are removing the invasives this summer. Then planting diverse native herbeceous, shrubs and tree species. We are choosing species with high habitat value, cultural significance, urban tolerance and climate change resilience and resistance. We will plant next fall and again in spring. We are looking at a 5 year, multi-phase project that will create a varied canopy structure and varied habitat. Mowed grass will become a native corridor and urban forest! We have formed a wonderful working team which includes: City of Syracuse City Arborist Parks and Recreation Office of Sustainability Onondaga County Soil and Water Conservation District USAD / NRCS People's Gardens NRCS Earth Core - volunteers Onondaga Earth Core - inner city youth project Cornell Cooperative Extension - volunteers SUNY College of Environmental Forestry - baseline and on-going research, volunteers and production of educational materials NYS Senator David Valesky's office - overall assistance and support Wild and Scenic Film Festival - 180 minutes of environmental films to be shown in neighborhood to help educate and involve neighborhood volunteers After DEC did not follow through on their committed work to clear former habitat site, OCCC sought and got permission from DEC and USACE for this new site. This site is in a very urban, polluted, disadvantaged section of town. This project will help bring life to the creek and also to the community! People are very excited and enthused. Neighbors who see us on site ask to help out and make their neighborhood better! OCCC is grateful and encouraged. FWF funding is what started this entire project rolling. Many thanks. Stacey Smith Onondaga Creek Conservation Council 315-470-0778
  • Detroit is a city with a great history and a promising future -- and I am proud to be a member of the West Grand Boulevard Collaborative (WGBC) -- a community organization working as a catalyst to build a safer and more beautiful community.  WGBC members are residents, businesses and institutions who cooperate to develop and foster an aesthetically pleasing atmosphere of peace and prosperity in their West Grand Blvd. community.   As Detroit builds toward its future, we know there are factors we can't control.  Climate scientists tell us that weather patterns are changing.  Rain events will produce greater volumes of rain and summer temperatures will be hotter.  Just this summer, 30 billion gallons of raw sewage was discharged into the Detroit and Rouge Rivers from our storm events (Sierra Club, Great Lakes Office).   But the WGBC is not only working to beautify their community, they are working to prevent raw sewage from being released into our lakes and rivers (and even backing up into our basements).  By means of preventing storm water from enteringsewers, the risk of polluting lakes, rivers and basements is greatly reduced.  To achieve this goal, The WGBC partnered with the Department of Horticulture at Michigan State University (MSU) to install three rain gardens at the Detroit Public Library -- Duffield Branch.  Under the professorship of Dr. Robert Schutzki,  WGBC community volunteers and MSU students completed the rain garden installations in June of this year. The three rain gardens, and the larger landscape plan, demonstrate the benefits of low-impact and sustainable landscape design by use of plants with deep roots (that store great amounts of water), permeable pavement (that allows water to flow through to be absorbed underground), and rain barrels (that collect water from  downspouts), etc.  These kinds of low impact and sustainable components help to reduce the amount of pollution entering the Detroit River and the Great Lakes.   The rain gardens at Duffield are  components of the Mary and Albert H. Mallory Reading Garden, which demonstrates how public and private grounds can be transformed into sustainable and beautiful low impact landscapes using horticultural design and sculputral artwork.  The reading garden will officially open in the spring of 2012.   Funding for this project has been graciously been provided by the Kresge Foundation--Community Arts Program, the College for Creative Studies, Freshwater Future, Sierra Club of Detroit, Henry Ford Hospital, Rosemary and James Evenhuis, Friends of the Detroit Public Library and Shock Brothers Tree Care.   The WGBC and the Detroit Public Libray would especially like to thank the dedicated and hard-working volunteers from Michigan State University, Sobriety House, Wayne State University -- AmeriiCorp and Henry Ford Hospital for helping us make a success of this project.     I sincerely hope that rain the gardens -- and all of the design elements that stop the pollution of our rivers and lakes,-- will be copied all over our city.  The Detroit River, Great Lakes and all of our water resources are vital and precious.  They must be kept clean for those hot summer days when we want to cool ourselves in Michigan waters, both now and in the future.
  • What impacts are likely in your project area
  • Reducing vulnerability to climate change

    1. 1. Jennie Hoffman EcoAdapt
    2. 2. CLIMAGEDDON
    3. 3. Climatic change is affecting all ecosystems, and will continue to do so for centuries, so… <ul><li>We need to incorporate climatic change into long-term planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimize risk of wasting time, money, and effort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maximize likelihood of success </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Great Lakes climate impacts worksheet But varies by season and region Trend Certainty What this means for ecosystems and people What this means for your work Air temperature Very High Rain High Lake temperature High Growing season High Lake level ? Medium
    5. 5. Great Lakes climate impacts worksheet Trend Certainty What this means for ecosystems and people What this means for your work Air temperature Very High Drier summers; increased drought likelihood; deadly heat waves; species range changes (including disease-causing organisms!) Rain High More runoff and flooding in certain seasons; risk of transfer of invasive spp to new places; possible seasonal dilution of pollution Lake temperature High Greater risk of harmful algal blooms; some species favored over others; altered toxicity Growing season High More ag productivity, unless droughts and floods win out; benefits some species over others Lake level ? Medium Phragmites world; tough infrastructure issues; remobilization of lakebed pollutants
    6. 6. Hydrologic & Vegetation Models Climate models Data Ecosystem responses ?
    7. 7. Hydrologic & Vegetation Models Climate models Data Ecosystem responses ? Economics Laws, Policies, Institutions Societal response
    8. 9. <ul><li>All climate models say things will get warmer; they disagree on just how much warmer </li></ul><ul><li>Models disagree on whether things get wetter or drier overall </li></ul>? ?
    9. 10. Scenario 1: It rains hard all day Scenario 4: It rains hard, but only briefly Scenario 3: It rains lightly Scenario 2: it doesn’t rain Core actions/strategies Contingent actions/strategies
    10. 11. <ul><li>Situation 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Your pet is sick </li></ul><ul><li>9 of 10 vets say it will die without treatment </li></ul><ul><li>The treatment is established, effective, has few side effects and is affordable. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you opt for: </li></ul><ul><li>Giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Not giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Trying an herbal remedy that worked for a friend’s pet </li></ul>
    11. 12. <ul><li>Situation 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Your pet is sick </li></ul><ul><li>4 of 10 vets say it will die without treatment </li></ul><ul><li>The treatment is established, effective, has few side effects and is affordable. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you opt for: </li></ul><ul><li>Giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Not giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Trying an herbal remedy that worked for a friend’s pet </li></ul>
    12. 13. <ul><li>Situation 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Your pet is sick </li></ul><ul><li>9 of 10 vets say it will die without treatment </li></ul><ul><li>There is no proven treatment, but there’s an expensive experimental drug with uncertain risks and effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you opt for: </li></ul><ul><li>Giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Not giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Trying an herbal remedy that worked for a friend’s pet </li></ul>
    13. 14. <ul><li>Situation 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Your pet is sick </li></ul><ul><li>4 of 10 vets say it will die without treatment </li></ul><ul><li>There is no proven treatment, but there’s an expensive experimental drug with uncertain risks and effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you opt for: </li></ul><ul><li>Giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Not giving it the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Trying an herbal remedy that worked for a friend’s pet </li></ul>
    14. 15. <ul><li>Situation 5 </li></ul><ul><li>Your child is sick </li></ul><ul><li>9 of 10 doctors say she will die without treatment </li></ul><ul><li>There is no proven treatment, but there’s an expensive experimental drug with uncertain risks and effectiveness. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you opt for: </li></ul><ul><li>Giving her the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Not giving her the drug </li></ul><ul><li>Trying an herbal remedy that worked for a friend’s child </li></ul>
    15. 16. Is Your Coastal Restoration Project Climate-Smart? Some Guidelines for the Great Lakes download a copy at: http://www.nwf.org/en/Global-Warming/~/media/PDFs/Global%20Warming/Climate-Smart-Conservation/FINAL%20Restoring%20the%20Great%20Lakes%20Coastal%20Future%202011.ashx  
    16. 17. Climate-Smart Planning Framework
    17. 18. 1. Identify restoration goals and targets <ul><li>GLRI Principal Actions: </li></ul><ul><li>Improve aquatic ecosystem resiliency </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance wetlands, wetland associated uplands, high priority coastal, upland, and inland habitat </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain, improve, enhance populations of native species </li></ul><ul><li>Restore habitat functioning in AOCs </li></ul>
    18. 19. 2. Identify restoration project approaches Reduce existing stressors Improve terrestrial/aquatic connectivity Protect key ecosystem features Maintain and improve diversity
    19. 20. 3. Assess vulnerability to climate change <ul><li>Sensitivity </li></ul><ul><li>Exposure </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptive capacity </li></ul><ul><li>Determine vulnerability </li></ul>Tools include: NatureServe Vulnerability Index, Climate Wizard, NOAA Digital Coast, NSPECT
    20. 21. Training Opportunities <ul><li>Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment Training Course </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration among NWF, FWS, NPS, and NOAA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next course: November 15-19, 2011 in Anchorage, AK - Space available! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Upcoming in Ohio – stay tuned! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For more resources on Vulnerability Assessments or to Register for next course visit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://training.fws.gov/CSP/Resources/climate_change/vulnerability.html </li></ul></ul></ul>
    21. 22. Training Opportunities (con’t) <ul><li>Safeguarding Wildlife from Climate Change Web Conference Series </li></ul><ul><ul><li>similar to a graduate seminar, last about 1 hour, and feature an interactive question-and-answer session </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>topics include: everything from community-based adaptation to species conservation in a landscape context </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Find upcoming webinars and archived webinars here: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://training.fws.gov/CSP/Resources/climate_ change/description.html </li></ul></ul></ul>
    22. 23. 4. Identify climate-smart management options Strategies to reduce sensitivity Strategies to reduce exposure Strategies to enhance adaptive capacity
    23. 24. 5. Select and implement management options Prioritize options by importance/urgency Prioritize options by likely benefits/performance Prioritize options by costs/feasibility
    24. 25. 6. Monitor, review, and revise Incorporate new science Evaluate effectiveness of management efforts Revisit one or more of the previous steps
    25. 27. <ul><li>Emily Whittaker, Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve </li></ul>Photo by Alexis Raney.
    26. 28. <ul><li>Yellow Dog Watershed Preserve </li></ul><ul><li>Working to incorporate climate considerations into mine permit conditions. </li></ul><ul><li>Top photo by Bill Kinjorski </li></ul>
    27. 29. Onondaga Creek Conservation Council
    28. 30. Planting Day
    29. 31. West Grand Boulevard Collaborative
    30. 33. Considering Climate isn’t new work to be done, it is a new way of working <ul><li>Think about how your work could be impacted by the effects of climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Assess the information you have </li></ul><ul><li>Brainstorm how you can incorporate climate adaptation activities based on what you know about climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Start taking action, monitor your effectiveness, and talk with others to ensure your work will provide the desired impact </li></ul>
    31. 34. Climate Adaptation Grants Program <ul><li>Projects to protect and restore wetlands; </li></ul><ul><li>On-the-ground restoration activities that incorporate climate adaption and include an action component to create permanent change </li></ul><ul><li>Advocating for low-impact solutions to community stormwater issues; </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in land use planning and zoning that engages climate related considerations; </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in watershed planning to introduce climate related components; </li></ul><ul><li>Watch-dogging and participating in the development, implementation, and enforcement of local, state, provincial, and federal aquatic habitat protection regulations as they relate to climate; </li></ul><ul><li>Non-partisan voter education, voter registration, and candidate forums; </li></ul><ul><li>Advocating for naturally functioning river and coastal ecosystems; </li></ul><ul><li>Reducing polluted runoff; and </li></ul><ul><li>Launching special initiatives or creating unique opportunities to strengthen citizen involvement in aquatic habitat protection and restoration related to climate adaptation. </li></ul>
    32. 35. Jill Ryan, Executive Director 231.348.8200 [email_address] View our Climate RFP at: www.freshwaterfuture.org/grants Thank you Kresge Foundation for your support and EcoAdapt for your expertise!

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