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Economic Impact Studies: Practical Tips & Examples - Lynn Vaccaro
 

Economic Impact Studies: Practical Tips & Examples - Lynn Vaccaro

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  • Cooperative program between um, msu, and noaa Extension through msu Communication and education through um Research through competitive grants program to all michigan universities
  • Cooperative program between um, msu, and noaa Extension through msu Communication and education through um Research through competitive grants program to all michigan universities
  • Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • For all states except Michigan, jobs must be in specific industries and in a coastal county to be considered connected to the Great Lakes. In Michigan, jobs in a few sectors are connected to the Great Lakes even if they are located in inland counties, specifically within mining, manufacturing, science and engineering. Michigan became a manufacturing hub because of its access to the Great Lakes and, unlike other states, the Great Lakes remain Michigan’s primary water transportation route for iron ore, coal, stone, grain and heavy machinery. Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • This analysis is based on the most recent annual estimates (2009) for county employment from the Bureau of Labor Statics' Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages and Occupational Employment Statistics programs. We reviewed over 1,000 industry categories and identified 67 that could be connected to the Great Lakes. Some of the industries included and excluded within a sector are listed to the right. Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • Explanation: Water used for cooling , drinking water, waste treatment Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • Michigan Sea Grant Program Review, April 15, 2010
  • Historically, industries developed in areas with abundant natural resources and inexpensive transportation, like the Great Lakes. However in the new economy, people and businesses are more mobile and they are locating in areas with a high quality of life, attractive urban areas and abundant recreational opportunities. Water is huge draw for people –coastal trails, clean beaches and waterfront businesses add tremendous value to both metropolitan and semi-rural areas. Unless we protect and restore our best environmental asset –the Great Lakes –we will not be able to retain and attract strong new businesses and great human resources.

Economic Impact Studies: Practical Tips & Examples - Lynn Vaccaro Economic Impact Studies: Practical Tips & Examples - Lynn Vaccaro Presentation Transcript

  • Economic Impact Studies: Practical Tips & Examples 9:00 Estimating the Number of Great Lakes Jobs Lynn Vaccaro Michigan Sea Grant 9:15 Quasi-Experiments in Empirical Economics: An Application to Extreme Levels of Lake Michigan Michael Moore University of Michigan 9:30 Recreational Fisheries: Using Customer Surveys to Assess Economic Impacts Dan O’Keefe Michigan Sea Grant Extension 9:45 Estimating the Benefits of Great Lakes Restoration Jennifer Read Michigan Sea Grant 10:00 Words of Advice, Discussion Chi-Ok Oh Michigan State University
  • Estimating the Number of Great Lakes Jobs Lynn Vaccaro Coastal Research Specialist Jennifer Read Assistant Director and Research Coordinator
    • How many jobs do the Great Lakes support?
    • The Great Lakes Shaped the Development of Our Economy
    U.S. Army Corp
    • Historically:
    • Passage for exploration and development
    • Water Highway for fur, lumber, iron ore, coal, steel, machinery
    • Enabled the region to become a manufacturing hub
    Randy Schaetzl Great Lakes Maritime History
    • Jobs in industries that:
      • Rely on the lakes for key inputs
      • Receive an economic advantage from the lakes
      • Are significantly influenced by the lakes
    • These industries would either not exist or not have developed to the extent that they have reached today without reliance upon the Great Lakes.
    Defining Great Lakes Jobs
    • Coastal counties for most industries
    • In Michigan, statewide for manufacturing, mining and science
    Where can we find Great Lakes Jobs?
      • U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      • Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages; Occupational Employment Statistics
      • Publicly available
      • Consistent geographically and historically
      • County level employment for 1000 different industry categories
    Data Sources
    • Manufacturing
    • Tourism and recreation
    • Shipping , including freight transport and warehousing
    • Agriculture, fishing and food production
    • Science and engineering
    • Utilities
    • Mining
    67 Great Lakes Industry Categories, Grouped into 7 Sectors:
    • Industries: chemical, durable and non-durable goods
    • Exclusions: printing, petroleum products
    • Jobs: 994,879
    • Wages: $43 billion
    Manufacturing Steel (Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore)
    • Industries: parks, historical sites, amusements, marinas, traveler accommodations, boat dealers
    • Exclusions: food service, gas, municipal transport
    • Jobs: 217,635
    • Wages: $5.1 billion
    Tourism and Recreation
    • Industries: water, rail, truck, warehousing
    • Exclusions: air, passenger and pipeline transport
    • Jobs: 118,550
    • Wages: $5.2 billion
    Shipping Rogers City 1930s, Erhardt Peters April 2011, Paul Beesley. www.maritimehistoryofthegreatlakes.ca
    • Industries: crops, fishing, aquaculture, food and beverage production
    • Exclusions: animal production, forestry
    • Jobs: 118,430
    • Wages: $4.8 billion
    Agriculture, Fishing and Food Production www.epa.gov/glinpo DIY Start
    • Occupations: environment, food, conservation, marine, atmospheric
    • Exclusions: most engineering and science occupations
    • Jobs: 38,085
    • Wages: $2.2 billion
    Science and Engineering
    • Industries: power, water, sewer
    • Exclusions: natural gas distribution
    • Jobs: 10,980
    • Wages: $880 million
    Utilities
    • Industries: coal, metal
    • Exclusions: oil, gas
    • Jobs: 10,003
    • Wages: $630 million
    Mining Taconite Processing , PolyMet Iron ore
    • The Great Lakes Support: 1.51 million jobs, $6.2 billion in wages
      • Factors that could lead to an Underestimate
      • Does not include: Coast Guard, Army Corp of Engineers, railroad workers, self employed and proprietors, domestic workers, farm labor
      • Suppressed data due to confidentiality
      • Does not consider indirect or induced employment
      • Factors that could lead to an Overestimate
      • Part time, seasonal and full time jobs counted equally
      • Lakes might not influence entire coastal county
      • Other Approaches
      • Economic Lake Effect?
    How accurate is this estimate?
  • Estimating the Number of Great Lakes Jobs Lynn Vaccaro [email_address] www.miseagrant.umich.edu/economy