Aquatic Connectivity:Benefiting Streams and Communities                     Lisha Ramsdell                   Program Direc...
Huron Pines       Conserving the Forests, Lakes and Streams of                                                     Northe...
    3
Barriers Impacting Connectivity:                          Dams:                            • Jumping Barrier              ...
Project Planning &  Prioritization          Basin-Wide Consistency                Data Sharing Resources available at: www...
Rifle River Watershed           • No Major Dams on the             Mainstream           • Coldwater Tributaries           ...
Prioritizing in the Rifle Watershed                   • 69 known dams-typically                     over 6 ft. high (red) ...
www.northernmichiganstreams.org                                  8
Prioritizing Projects“Whole Picture” strategyJustifies Project Choices   •   Based on Unbiased Data   •   Peer Review of F...
Involve Partners     EarlyConservation Groups Resource Managers   (DEQ & DNR)Local MunicipalitiesPrivate Foundations      ...
Project Scope                                 Balancing Needs                                 Agree on what’s getting done...
ProvidingLeadership Coordinating Partners   (One Point of Contact)Motivating and Inspiring        Teaching        Learning...
Priorities Across the Landscape  Sell the Process of Site Selection/Prioritization Watershed-wide Impacts   Prepared for “...
Lisha Ramsdell     Program Directorlisha@huronpines.org        (989) 344-0753www.huronpines.org                         14
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Aquatic Connectivity: Benefitting Streams and Communities-Ramsdell, 2012

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This workshop highlights successful large scale, on-the-ground restoration efforts that are re-connecting aquatic habitats fragmented by dams, road crossings, and other man-made alterations in the Upper Great Lakes. Tools and strategies will be shared for planning, financing, and articulating results, including the mutual benefits of restoring streams, improving community infrastructure, and creating local jobs.

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Aquatic Connectivity: Benefitting Streams and Communities-Ramsdell, 2012

  1. 1. Aquatic Connectivity:Benefiting Streams and Communities Lisha Ramsdell Program Director 1
  2. 2. Huron Pines Conserving the Forests, Lakes and Streams of  Northeast Michigan Huron Pines is a nonprofit environmental organization established in 1973. Located in Gaylord, MI, we strive to reach our conservation goals by connecting our region’s water, land and people.We join with a variety of partners such as local governments, non-profits, area residents and privatebusinesses to complete our goals. 2
  3. 3.  3
  4. 4. Barriers Impacting Connectivity: Dams: • Jumping Barrier • Velocity Barrier • Interrupts Nutrient Flow/Distribution Road/Stream Crossings: •Velocity Barriers •Jumping Barriers •Sediment Pollution Entrance Point 4
  5. 5. Project Planning & Prioritization Basin-Wide Consistency Data Sharing Resources available at: www.huronpines.org 5
  6. 6. Rifle River Watershed • No Major Dams on the Mainstream • Coldwater Tributaries • Natural River Designation • Forest/Agriculture • High recreation use • Supports Large Fish Migrations • Flows into Saginaw Bay (AOC) 6
  7. 7. Prioritizing in the Rifle Watershed • 69 known dams-typically over 6 ft. high (red) • 85 additional “suspect” dams-aerial survey (yellow) • 245 road/stream crossings (green) • 63 RSX sites were determined “not passable” • 217 aquatic barriers 7
  8. 8. www.northernmichiganstreams.org 8
  9. 9. Prioritizing Projects“Whole Picture” strategyJustifies Project Choices • Based on Unbiased Data • Peer Review of FindingsBenefits of Prioritizing • Provides Flexibility in Funding Usage • Offers Suite of Projects • “Bundling” Capability • Educates Partners • Tracks Regional Needs and Progress 9
  10. 10. Involve Partners EarlyConservation Groups Resource Managers (DEQ & DNR)Local MunicipalitiesPrivate Foundations TribesPrivate LandownersU.S. Fish and Wildlife U.S. Forest Service 10
  11. 11. Project Scope Balancing Needs Agree on what’s getting done • Select appropriate Best Management Practices (BMP) • Aquatic Passage • Reduce SedimentationOther Conservation ConcernsBring together diverse funding 11
  12. 12. ProvidingLeadership Coordinating Partners (One Point of Contact)Motivating and Inspiring Teaching Learning Staying focused Navigating Obstacles 12
  13. 13. Priorities Across the Landscape Sell the Process of Site Selection/Prioritization Watershed-wide Impacts Prepared for “Shovel Ready” RequestsFunding Proposals Tailored by Deliverable, NOT site 13
  14. 14. Lisha Ramsdell Program Directorlisha@huronpines.org (989) 344-0753www.huronpines.org 14
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