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Math workshop slides
 

Math workshop slides

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Workshop on 17 Feb

Workshop on 17 Feb

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  • Maths Parent Workshop: P2 Mathematics Problem Solving With Model Drawing - The model drawing method is an effective approach for problem solving and leaning mathematical concepts. This approach is first introduced to pupils at P2 and they can represent mathematical relationships in a problem pictorially. Model drawing would help pupils understand the mathematics problem and plan the steps for solution. At this workshop, parents will have hands-on practice on doing problem solving by drawing bar models (i.e. either part-whole or comparison model). Parents, thereafter would be able to support their children to do problem solving in a concrete and pictorial approach - model drawing.
  • Part-whole modelA whole is divided into 2 or more parts.When the parts are known, we can find the whole by addition.When the whole and one part are unknown, we can find the unknown part by subtraction.Comparison ModelThe model shows the relationship between two or more quantities when they are compared.When A and B are given, we can find the difference between them or the ratio.Conversely, we can find A or B when one of them and the difference are given.
  • A whole is divided into 2 or more parts.When the parts are known, we can find the whole by addition.When the whole and one part are unknown, we can find the unknown part by subtraction.
  • Maths Parent Workshop: P1 Mathematics Assessment Briefing - This briefing aims to give parents a clear understanding of the other forms of assessment besides the written examinations that schools are adopting, primarily focusing on building P1 pupils' confidence and desire to learn. Parents will have hands-on experience with the bite-sized form of assessment i.e. performance tasks used to engage P1 pupils who are just beginning school in meaningful learning tasks. These performance tasks also serve to assess pupils' process skills and attitudes such as showing confidence in using mathematics, and appreciating the beauty and power of mathematics through hands-on activities.Maths Parent Workshop: P2 Mathematics Problem Solving With Model Drawing - The model drawing method is an effective approach for problem solving and leaning mathematical concepts. This approach is first introduced to pupils at P2 and they can represent mathematical relationships in a problem pictorially. Model drawing would help pupils understand the mathematics problem and plan the steps for solution. At this workshop, parents will have hands-on practice on doing problem solving by drawing bar models (i.e. either part-whole or comparison model). Parents, thereafter would be able to support their children to do problem solving in a concrete and pictorial approach - model drawing.
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • A whole is divided into 2 or more parts.When the parts are known, we can find the whole by addition.When the whole and one part are unknown, we can find the unknown part by subtraction.
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated
  • Read the questionUnderline the important information in phrases or short sentencesTransfer information read into a modelPut in the ‘?’ to represent missing information that needs to be calculated

Math workshop slides Math workshop slides Presentation Transcript

  • whole part part A B whole difference part17 February 20124 to 6 p.m.
  • Problem Solving With Model Drawing Why model drawing? What are the models learned in P2? How do I draw a model? Classroom Practice Q&A
  • A problem-solving strategy that helps pupils to better understand fraction, ratio and percentage later to adopt a plan in solving maths problems to know a less abstract than the algebraic method to solve challenging problemsSource: Foong, P.Y. (2008). Problem Solving in Mathematics. Teaching Primary School Mathematics: A Resource Book (2nd ed.). (pp. 54-67). Singapore: McGraw Hill.
  • 1. See (restate problem in own words) • What is the problem asking you to do? • What are we trying to find out?2. Plan (explore and select a strategy) • What do we know? • What do we need to know to solve the problem? • What strategies are useful?3. Do (implement and solve) • Carry out the plan4. Check (confirm whether answer is reasonable, extend) • Does it make sense? adapted from Polya, G. (1971).How to solve it. (2nd ed.) Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • R-CUB (Read, Circle, Underline, Box)Read the question carefully.Circle (numbers), Underline (key words) & Box(names, if any) the important information inshort phrases or sentences.Transfer information read to model drawing.Put in ? to represent answer to be found.
  • 1. Part-whole model (also known as ‘part-part-whole’ model) part part whole 2. Comparison model A B differenceSource: Foong, P.Y. (2008). Problem Solving in Mathematics. Teaching Primary School Mathematics: A Resource Book (2nd ed.). (pp. 54-67). Singapore: McGraw Hill.
  • part part Points to note whole The greater the number, the longer its corresponding rectangle (bar). Questions commonly asked include • looking for the missing part given the other part(s) and the whole • looking for the whole given the partsSource: Foong, P.Y. (2008). Problem Solving in Mathematics. Teaching Primary School Mathematics: A Resource Book (2nd ed.). (pp. 54-67). Singapore: McGraw Hill.
  • Q1. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 17 pencils. How many pencils do they have altogether?
  • Q1. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 17 pencils. How many pencils do they have altogether? 14 17 114 + 17 -------- 31 -------- ?14 + 17 = 31They have 31 pencils altogether.
  • Q2. After using 215 beads to make a chain, Mary had 116 beads left. How many beads did she have at first?
  • Q2. After using 215 beads to make a chain, Mary had 116 beads left. How many beads did she have at first?
  • Q2. After using 215 beads to make a chain, Mary had 116 beads left. How many beads did she have at first? 215 used 116 left 1 2 1 5 + 1 1 6 3 3 1 ? at first215 + 116 = 331She had 331 beads at first.
  • Q3. There were 125 pupils in a school. 58 of the pupils were girls. How many boys were there?
  • Q3. There were 125 pupils in a school. 58 of the pupils were girls. How many boys were there?
  • Q3. There were 125 pupils in a school. 58 of the pupils were girls. How many boys were there? 58 girls ? boys 0 11 1 1 2 5 - 5 8 6 7 125 pupils125 – 58 = 67There were 67 boys.
  • Q4. There were 854 people at a fun fair. There were 410 adults and 135 boys. How many girls were there? Note: The differences of people, adults, men, women, children, boys and girls.
  • Q4. There were 854 people at a fun fair. There were 410 adults and 135 boys. How many girls were there?
  • Q4. There were 854 people at a fun fair. There were 410 adults and 135 boys. How many girls were there? 854 people 410 adults 135 boys ? girls854 – 410 = 444 410 + 135 = 545444 – 135 = 309 OR 854 – 545 = 309 There were 309 girls.
  • whole A B difference part Questions commonly asked include: • find one of the parts given the whole and the difference. • find the difference given the whole and one of the parts. • how many more or less?Source: Foong, P.Y. (2008). Problem Solving in Mathematics. Teaching Primary School Mathematics: A Resource Book (2nd ed.). (pp. 54-67). Singapore: McGraw Hill.
  • Q1. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 17 more pencils than John. How many pencils does Peter have?
  • Q1. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 17 more pencils than John. How many pencils does Peter have? 1 14 17 more 1 4J + 1 7P 3 114 + 17 = 31 ?Peter has 31 pencils.
  • Q2. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 8 fewer pencils than John. How many pencils does Peter have?
  • Q2. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 8 fewer pencils than John. How many pencils does Peter have?
  • Q2. John has 14 pencils. Peter has 8 fewer pencils than John. How many pencils does Peter have? 14 0 1J 1 4P - 8 6 ? 8 fewer14 – 8 = 6Peter has 6 pencils.
  • Q3. Ramu has 250 stamps. He has 160 fewer stamps than Jay. How many stamps does Jay have?
  • Q3. Ramu has 250 stamps. He has 160 fewer stamps than Jay. How many stamps does Jay have?
  • Q3. Ramu has 250 stamps. He has 160 fewer stamps than Jay. How many stamps does Jay have? 250 160 fewer 1R 2 5 0J + 1 6 0 4 1 0 ?250 + 160 = 410Jay has 410 stamps.
  • Q4. Ben has 250 marbles. He has 160 more marbles than Ahmad. How many marbles does Ahmad have?
  • Q4. Ben has 250 marbles. He has 160 more marbles than Ahmad. How many marbles does Ahmad have?
  • Q4. Ben has 250 marbles. He has 160 more marbles than Ahmad. How many marbles does Ahmad have? 250 1 1B 2 5 0Am - 1 6 0 9 0 ? 160 more250 – 160 = 90Ahmad has 90 marbles.
  • Q5. Shirley has 250 crayons. Wei En has 90 crayons. How many more crayons does Shirley have than Wei En?
  • Q5. Shirley has 250 crayons. Wei En has 90 crayons. How many more crayons does Shirley have than Wei En?
  • Q5. Shirley has 250 crayons. Wei En has 90 crayons. How many more crayons does Shirley have than Wei En? 250 1 1S 2 5 0W - 9 0 1 6 0 90 ? more250 – 90 = 160Shirley has 160 more crayons than Wei En.
  • Q1. Beatrice bought 36 candies and chocolates. If she bought twice as many candies as chocolates, how many candies did she buy?
  • Q1. Beatrice bought 36 candies and chocolates. If she bought twice as many candies as chocolates, how many candies did she buy?
  • Q1. Beatrice bought 36 candies and chocolates. If she bought twice as many candies as chocolates, how many candies did she buy? ?Candies 36Chocolates 3 units -> 36 1 unit -> 36 ÷ 3 = 12 2 units -> 12 x 2 = 24 She bought 24 candies.
  • Q2. Baker Joe bakes 61 tarts and buns each day. He bakes 15 fewer tarts than buns. How many buns does Baker Joe bake each day?
  • Q2. Baker Joe bakes 61 tarts and buns each day. He bakes 15 fewer tarts than buns. How many buns does Baker Joe bake each day?
  • Q2. Baker Joe bakes 61 tarts and buns each day. He bakes 15 fewer tarts than buns. How many buns does Baker Joe bake each day? ?Buns 15 61Tarts 61 – 15 = 46 46 ÷ 2 = 23 23 + 15 = 38 Baker Joe bakes 38 buns each day.